EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › Who wants to help me choose a new ride?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Who wants to help me choose a new ride? - Page 3

post #61 of 78
First several ladlefuls of chum. Then the bait with the hook in it. smile.gif
post #62 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

First several ladlefuls of chum. Then the bait with the hook in it. smile.gif

 

ha I guess...

 

Iriponsnow....

 

I am 5'11 and if anything the bike was alittle small on me. I had it set up as a SS MTB with lock out able fork but it just did not work as a SS and I have no use for geared hardtail. My guess is should fit you. With flat bars I am guessing the stock stem should work great.

 

its this frame right here....

 

the frame is 3.2 lb and stiff as hell.

 

http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeSpecs.aspx?year=2012&brand=Giant&model=XTC+29er+2#.Uem_-W222DQ

post #63 of 78

That ^ is a bad-ass bike!  

 

 

I want to see those tires mounted up!  

post #64 of 78
Thread Starter 

Old




New & improved!
post #65 of 78
Thread Starter 


Another look smile.gif
post #66 of 78

Nice looking bike... and it's steel.  Sweet!  That's some cushy tape!

 

So, how does it ride with those new tires????

post #67 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post

Nice looking bike... and it's steel.  Sweet!  That's some cushy tape!

So, how does it ride with those new tires????

I am leaving shortly for an attempt at a speed record of the Presidential Traverse, this was a taper project!! I have not yet ridden the lime green machine.
post #68 of 78

it should be much faster now!  biggrin.gif

post #69 of 78
Thread Starter 
One can hope!
post #70 of 78
Thread Starter 
Initial voyage underway....
post #71 of 78
Thread Starter 
So here's my much anticipated first ride report and observations from my bicycle upgrade. Now you have to remember that this entire bicycle upgrade came at a cost of $75.

I took the bike out yesterday morning for about an hour pounding and this is my experience: I was generally underwhelmed. Here's why



Tires: the tires are absolutely phenomenal not only do they offer little bit of Gripp however they look just completely wild and green. Also on a more serious note these tires run a slightly less tire pressure
And offer more shock absorption. Where I was not incredibly thrilled with these was that this tire is a 28 mmcyclocross tire. I would've thought that a cyclocross tire would've provided a little bit more cushion and seeing how these are only several millimeters narrower than the UCI legal 32 mm tire I was quite underwhelmed with the cyclocross tires.

Gearing: gearing on this bike is way too high for the roads I was traveling. I found myself utilizing the last three cogs in the lower chain ring. I also found myself standing to climb a considerable amount of the time in the lowest chain ring possible. I should that I was out of class for class V road and not on the true Firetower Trail at this point.

Handlebar wrap tape: this is by far the best part of the bike. Combined with the slightly less air pressure in the tires and the steel frame, this gave a very comfortable and very smooth ride the bicycle. This is especially so when noticed on undulating terrain. On the excursions onto lighter paths , this was just phenomenal to have a softer version of the new handlebar tape. It made me realize how it bicycles look really a living creature and cannot be neglected for so long. I would probably tape my bars every couple seasons after this.

Breaking: overall the breaking was much better than I expected. I was thinking that the brakes would be subpar due to the fact that they were not the disks I was used to on my mountain bike, however this is not the case. With the only noticeable exception of when we were doing longer down hills, I found breaking to really be acceptable. On long down hills , breaking was absolutely no fun at all with the road levers.

Once I got back onto the road, real paved road pavement tarmac, I really was happy that I made these upgrades to the bicycle. Living in rural New England and having access to all sorts of broken up roads, this is really a perfect road road bike. The gearing work. The frame was nice and springy with its Reynolds steel. And I absolutely just love the fact that the bicycle fits me perfectly.

That said, my real attention for this bicycle was to build up an offer of machine that would allow me to do some light cross training in addition to my running. I was looking for this to be an easy day activity it would give me a little bit of fun and they would not overstressed my body as I recovered from some more intense rides or Trailrun poundings. That said I was quite disappointed in the cyclocross style bike that I had arrived at four off-road riding. I was really glad that I had not going out and purchased a cyclocross bike without this experience. I think I still may be in the market for cyclocross bike however I have a much better understanding of the limitations of the machinery. Really the difference between a 28 mm tire and a 32 mm tire it is UCI legal is really minimal at best. So confounding is this revelation that I almost wonder why one would subject oneself to an activity with such a limitation on the tire width

Final thoughts: one of the things that I've learned in my coaching and years of experience is that an athlete really needs to identify with not only the program but their gear. I think this is a perfect upgrade for a bicycle that I'm going to ride on the roads of New England. It's also very satisfying to have a little mini project complete. I also must know that I'm happy not to have tires that are about to explode or handlebar wrap it is over a decade old.

I don't think that I would purchase cyclocross bike at this point. I do think the new project might be underway and overdue for me, and that perhaps building up a monster Crosspike or a rigid 29 would be the way to go. I think drop bars and a rigid fork might be a really hot set up. I believe Josh may have mentioned this earlier in the thread. This would give you a much broader tire selection and width to play with. I also think that the one ring set up in the front is the way to go & that more traditional to finger mountain style brake levers would be advantageous.

Thoughts?
post #72 of 78

What gearing do you have now? Since your shifter can probably only handle a double, I'd say the easy first upgrade is to get a compact crank. 34/50 vs. what I suspect is a 39/53. It's not a huge difference, but it's a difference. It looks like that cassette is probably already a 27t. If it's a 23 or 25, the 27 is your next move.

 

If you are OK with spending a bit more, you can do something like get an XT rear der. and an 11-34 cassette that paired with a compact double will have you crawling up trees (or at least Lincoln Gap).

post #73 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

<snip>
Once I got back onto the road, real paved road pavement tarmac, I really was happy that I made these upgrades to the bicycle. Living in rural New England and having access to all sorts of broken up roads, this is really a perfect road road bike. The gearing work. The frame was nice and springy with its Reynolds steel. And I absolutely just love the fact that the bicycle fits me perfectly.

That said, my real attention for this bicycle was to build up an offer of machine that would allow me to do some light cross training in addition to my running. I was looking for this to be an easy day activity it would give me a little bit of fun and they would not overstressed my body as I recovered from some more intense rides or Trailrun poundings. 
<snip>
Thoughts?

 

You've got your perfect road bike, fantastic!  

 

Now you need a bike for some light cross training on rough roads that has easy gearing.   That sounds a lot like a mountain bike to me.

 

I'm back to just get a mountain bike, any mountain bike.  Preferably a XC race type bike, but for what you described an entry level 29r hardtail would be great.   I don't see any reason for a fully rigid bike, or building up a franken cross bike for your needs.  If you were racing on those roads AND you cared about winning, then sure, but for cross training bike a MTB is fine.

 

A mountain bike will also allow you to.... go mountain biking too!   That's a pretty fun activity as you already know smile.gif

 

And, thanks for the motivation to put new tape on my road bike.  It really needs it!

post #74 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post

You've got your perfect road bike, fantastic!  

Now you need a bike for some light cross training on rough roads that has easy gearing.   That sounds a lot like a mountain bike to me.

I'm back to just get a mountain bike, any mountain bike.  Preferably a XC race type bike, but for what you described an entry level 29r hardtail would be great.   I don't see any reason for a fully rigid bike, or building up a franken cross bike for your needs.  If you were racing on those roads AND you cared about winning, then sure, but for cross training bike a MTB is fine.

A mountain bike will also allow you to.... go mountain biking too!   That's a pretty fun activity as you already know smile.gif

And, thanks for the motivation to put new tape on my road bike.  It really needs it!

Yeah! Roadie is perfect!!

Came out of almost a decade of retirement to race the mountain bike @ Benson Rally. Took second & coming home w a large chunk of ADK wood aka "first loser trophy". So it is not the bike, yet racing the Trek fuel 95 made me realize how beat it is!

Thinking I need a mtn bike, any bike....new project time smile.gif
post #75 of 78

Plus one for the suggestion of a Cyclocross bike with disc brakes for your needs.  700 X34 tires will be resilient enough to allow you to ride the firearoads, yet fast enogh to ride on the pavement almost as fast a dedicated road bike.  Keep the knobs short on the tires.  I am partial to Maxxis Raze tires myself.  That is what I run on my Kona Jake the Snake.  

 

As for gearing, not sure how strong you are, but 36-46 X 12-27 should allow you to ride just about anything.

post #76 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post
 

Plus one for the suggestion of a Cyclocross bike with disc brakes for your needs.  700 X34 tires will be resilient enough to allow you to ride the firearoads, yet fast enogh to ride on the pavement almost as fast a dedicated road bike.  Keep the knobs short on the tires.  I am partial to Maxxis Raze tires myself.  That is what I run on my Kona Jake the Snake.  

 

As for gearing, not sure how strong you are, but 36-46 X 12-27 should allow you to ride just about anything.

 

 

he is not talking fireroad his talking class 4 roads. class 4 road can make most singletrack look smooth

post #77 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

So here's my much anticipated first ride report and observations from my bicycle upgrade. Now you have to remember that this entire bicycle upgrade came at a cost of $75.

I took the bike out yesterday morning for about an hour pounding and this is my experience: I was generally underwhelmed. Here's why



Tires: the tires are absolutely phenomenal not only do they offer little bit of Gripp however they look just completely wild and green. Also on a more serious note these tires run a slightly less tire pressure
And offer more shock absorption. Where I was not incredibly thrilled with these was that this tire is a 28 mmcyclocross tire. I would've thought that a cyclocross tire would've provided a little bit more cushion and seeing how these are only several millimeters narrower than the UCI legal 32 mm tire I was quite underwhelmed with the cyclocross tires.

Gearing: gearing on this bike is way too high for the roads I was traveling. I found myself utilizing the last three cogs in the lower chain ring. I also found myself standing to climb a considerable amount of the time in the lowest chain ring possible. I should that I was out of class for class V road and not on the true Firetower Trail at this point.

Handlebar wrap tape: this is by far the best part of the bike. Combined with the slightly less air pressure in the tires and the steel frame, this gave a very comfortable and very smooth ride the bicycle. This is especially so when noticed on undulating terrain. On the excursions onto lighter paths , this was just phenomenal to have a softer version of the new handlebar tape. It made me realize how it bicycles look really a living creature and cannot be neglected for so long. I would probably tape my bars every couple seasons after this.

Breaking: overall the breaking was much better than I expected. I was thinking that the brakes would be subpar due to the fact that they were not the disks I was used to on my mountain bike, however this is not the case. With the only noticeable exception of when we were doing longer down hills, I found breaking to really be acceptable. On long down hills , breaking was absolutely no fun at all with the road levers.

Once I got back onto the road, real paved road pavement tarmac, I really was happy that I made these upgrades to the bicycle. Living in rural New England and having access to all sorts of broken up roads, this is really a perfect road road bike. The gearing work. The frame was nice and springy with its Reynolds steel. And I absolutely just love the fact that the bicycle fits me perfectly.

That said, my real attention for this bicycle was to build up an offer of machine that would allow me to do some light cross training in addition to my running. I was looking for this to be an easy day activity it would give me a little bit of fun and they would not overstressed my body as I recovered from some more intense rides or Trailrun poundings. That said I was quite disappointed in the cyclocross style bike that I had arrived at four off-road riding. I was really glad that I had not going out and purchased a cyclocross bike without this experience. I think I still may be in the market for cyclocross bike however I have a much better understanding of the limitations of the machinery. Really the difference between a 28 mm tire and a 32 mm tire it is UCI legal is really minimal at best. So confounding is this revelation that I almost wonder why one would subject oneself to an activity with such a limitation on the tire width

Final thoughts: one of the things that I've learned in my coaching and years of experience is that an athlete really needs to identify with not only the program but their gear. I think this is a perfect upgrade for a bicycle that I'm going to ride on the roads of New England. It's also very satisfying to have a little mini project complete. I also must know that I'm happy not to have tires that are about to explode or handlebar wrap it is over a decade old.

I don't think that I would purchase cyclocross bike at this point. I do think the new project might be underway and overdue for me, and that perhaps building up a monster Crosspike or a rigid 29 would be the way to go. I think drop bars and a rigid fork might be a really hot set up. I believe Josh may have mentioned this earlier in the thread. This would give you a much broader tire selection and width to play with. I also think that the one ring set up in the front is the way to go & that more traditional to finger mountain style brake levers would be advantageous.

Thoughts?

 

I read your post and here are my thoughts:

 

Your 28c tires are likely the limiting factor, comfort wise.  I run 35c Maxxis Raze tires on my CX bike, and they are amazing at absorbing road shock. Yet, on the pavement, they are almost as fast as road tires.   I surmise that your road frame and caliper brakes would not allow that option.

Your front gearing (looks like 39-53T) is too high for CX and riding fire roads.  I personnally run 34-46T chainrings, and am extremely pleased with that combo.  You need  a compact (110 bcd) crankset in order to do that.

post #78 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post

I read your post and here are my thoughts:

Your 28c tires are likely the limiting factor, comfort wise.  I run 35c Maxxis Raze tires on my CX bike, and they are amazing at absorbing road shock. Yet, on the pavement, they are almost as fast as road tires.   I surmise that your road frame and caliper brakes would not allow that option.
Your front gearing (looks like 39-53T) is too high for CX and riding fire roads.  I personnally run 34-46T chainrings, and am extremely pleased with that combo.  You need  a compact (110 bcd) crankset in order to do that.

Much agreed, I have to update the thread as there have been a few developments. Josh was really kind in offering a project frame & parts, yet the sizing was just a little big when I checked out Giants site.
Stay tuned!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › Who wants to help me choose a new ride?