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Expert Boot Advice given by Jeff, Boot Fixation  

post #1 of 178
Thread Starter 
For the last year, I have been making regular contributions to this site. What I have been doing is answering ski boot questions, and my expertise comes from my 17 years of experience doing alignment, fitting and coaching. I own Boot Fixation in Breckenridge, CO, and I will be releasing a cutting edge book on ski technique sometime this summer (2004).

I think this is a great site and I have enjoyed answering people's question, but there a couple of changes I need to have happen for me to continue contributing. The problem is it is taking far too long for me to answer these questions, and I simply do not have the time. However, I think a few changes could serve everyone involved better.

Here are the ideas...

1. Formatting is extremely important- PLEASE START WITH ALL THE BACKGROUND INFORMATION. THEN AT THE END OF THE EMAIL, NUMBER EACH QUESTION YOU HAVE FOR ME AND KEEP THESE QUESTIONS TOGETHER. What has been happening is I have to sort through each email for the questions, which makes it very easy for me to miss some of the questions.

2. If you want to respond to a person's question, that is fine. There have been some good thoughts. Just keep your response short, three to four sentences maximum. If you need more room, contact the person privately, or start a new thread. It takes me too much time to sort these responses from questions, and sometimes I disagree with the responses. I do not have time to correct some of the long responses.

That is about it. I really enjoy being involved with Epic- it is definitely a great group of people. But if this format is not followed I simply will not have the time to respond to questions. I will just stop responding.

So please help me so I can help all of you. If this format is followed, I should be able to check the site at least every week, which is more often than I could last winter.

Also, sometimes it is easier to ask questions on the phone. You are welcome to call me at my shop with questions, as long as they are not too long. The number for Boot Fixation is 970-453-8546. I am even happy to call back if I am either not at the shop or just cannot talk.

Let's stay in touch,

Jeff Bergeron
post #2 of 178
OK Jeff.... short and sweet.

Background.... strong fem skier / instructor in 23.5 Technica Innotec 9X boots with zipfit liners that are shot. I have a square D width forefoot, slightly high arch, average-slightly narrow heel. I haven't been getting enough support in this boot, as evident by ankle strain from the weight coming off my heel when I flex. I'm looking at Solly X Wave 8, and possibly Nordica W series. The Nordica's haven't made it in to the shop yet, buy look promising.

Question: 1) How does the flex compare between Solly 8, the W10& W12 Nordica's?
2) Would you recommend one boot over the other,which model Nordica, and or any other boots to add to the list?

Thanks......
post #3 of 178
Jeff,

It's time to buy boots for my 15 year old son. He's 5' 9", only weighs about 125 pounds, but has size 11-11.5 feet. To make things a little more complicated, his foot is fairly narrow (C) with long toes, and he has a slender calf. He likes to spend most of his time on single and double black runs in our So. Cal. mountains, and on the blue-blacks and single blacks at Mammoth Mtn. He spends about 80% of his time on the groomed and we rarely see deep powder. He spends some time in the bumps but prefers open faces and higher speeds.

We've been considering boots that seem to fall into the low end of the "AME/Freeride" category or upper end of the "Cruiser" class: Lange CRL 90, Lange Comp 100, Head FR 8.5 or 9.5, and Rossi Bandit X or XX. And a local shop has some of last year's Lange Banshee 100s at a nice price.

1. Can you recommend some boots that are fairly narrow, in this general performance range, and not too stiff for his weight?

Thanks.
Gary
post #4 of 178
Mr. Bergeron,

I am planning a visit this Thanksgiving to Boulder to visit colleges, and my mom has agreed to take me skiing one of the days. If I can manage, I will also visit a boot shop to consider buying my first pair of boots.

I am more or less an all-mountain skier: I loooove bowls and powder, but I'll ski anything from soft moguls to park to pipe to high speed groomers to deep tree runs. I will have a brand new Pocket Rocket setup this winter with a Solomon 912 or 914 binding, and I was looking for some input on boots. I am interested a little more in comfort than in responsiveness, but not enough, I don't think, to consider soft boots. Some have mentioned the Rossi XX, Salomon 1080, Solomon X Wave 8 and 9, and even the Nordica Beast. I have about a size 11, slightly narrow foot and sensitive shins. Softer plastic shells seem attractive. I only ski about 15 days a year, but I'm looking for a boot that could take me through college in the mountains.

1. Within reasonable proximity to Boulder, what is the best shop to buy boots?

2. If I were to ski one day, would Breck be open so that I could visit your shop? If so, what is the name?

3. If I buy boots one day, can I get them fitted at a totally different store months later?

4. What are your 2 cents on the boots mentioned above, and could you give a few more suggestions?

Much obliged,
Max Gosey, 16
post #5 of 178
Jeff,

Background: Me - 5'9", 160lb, upper itermediate. Shoe size 11.5. Current boot is Salomon Evolution 7.0, size 28.5, I believe. Been skiing it for last 4 years, and fit is great, no pain or discomfort. Using the standard footbeds that came with it and no mods to the boot. Time for me to get something better.

1. I know from other posts, you don't like the Evo. Could you recommend boots with better flex/ski control that have similar fit to the Evo?

Thanks in advance,
Gary
post #6 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by EasternSkiBum:
OK Jeff.... short and sweet.

Background.... strong fem skier / instructor in 23.5 Technica Innotec 9X boots with zipfit liners that are shot. I have a square D width forefoot, slightly high arch, average-slightly narrow heel. I haven't been getting enough support in this boot, as evident by ankle strain from the weight coming off my heel when I flex. I'm looking at Solly X Wave 8, and possibly Nordica W series. The Nordica's haven't made it in to the shop yet, buy look promising.

Question: 1) How does the flex compare between Solly 8, the W10& W12 Nordica's?
2) Would you recommend one boot over the other,which model Nordica, and or any other boots to add to the list?

Thanks......
EasternSkiBum

Good questions. The Flex between the Salomon and the Nordica W's are actually quite similar. Both boots have good flex patterns. The chief difference is that the Salomons are more upright than the Nordica, and considering your current ankle strain, this may be a good thing. Unfortanately, the Salomons do not have quite as much padding in the heel area, but this should not be a significant problem for you.

Another boot series to consider is Rossignol. Try either the Power 70w, Bandit Xw or the 9.1 or 9.2 Pro models.

Good Luck,
Jeff
post #7 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by G.Law:
Jeff,

It's time to buy boots for my 15 year old son. He's 5' 9", only weighs about 125 pounds, but has size 11-11.5 feet. To make things a little more complicated, his foot is fairly narrow (C) with long toes, and he has a slender calf. He likes to spend most of his time on single and double black runs in our So. Cal. mountains, and on the blue-blacks and single blacks at Mammoth Mtn. He spends about 80% of his time on the groomed and we rarely see deep powder. He spends some time in the bumps but prefers open faces and higher speeds.

We've been considering boots that seem to fall into the low end of the "AME/Freeride" category or upper end of the "Cruiser" class: Lange CRL 90, Lange Comp 100, Head FR 8.5 or 9.5, and Rossi Bandit X or XX. And a local shop has some of last year's Lange Banshee 100s at a nice price.

1. Can you recommend some boots that are fairly narrow, in this general performance range, and not too stiff for his weight?

Thanks.
Gary
Good questions, Gary. What would be ideal for your son would be so of the softer high end race boots. These would do an excellent job of holding his foot and leg, but could still be made to flex. The only problem is that they can be expensive and often require some flex modification. If you have a good boot fitter in your area who can modify flex you can consider the Tecnica Icon XT17 (not related to the other Icons), the Rossi Plug boot in the soft flex (B/B), or possibly next year's Atomic Race Tech. Most boys feet stop growing around age 15-16.

If this is not an option, then your list is fairly good. I would start with the Lange Comp 120 LF (LOW FIT), and if that does not work try the Lange Comp 100 MF (medium fit). The Head could be okay as long as it is in the 97mm width and not the 103mm width (the 9.5 is a 97, but the 8.5 is a 103). I think you will want to stay away from the Rossi.

The Lange Banshee 110 is also an excellent choice.

Good Luck, Jeff
post #8 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Maxilovesthepow:
Mr. Bergeron,

I am planning a visit this Thanksgiving to Boulder to visit colleges, and my mom has agreed to take me skiing one of the days. If I can manage, I will also visit a boot shop to consider buying my first pair of boots.

I am more or less an all-mountain skier: I loooove bowls and powder, but I'll ski anything from soft moguls to park to pipe to high speed groomers to deep tree runs. I will have a brand new Pocket Rocket setup this winter with a Solomon 912 or 914 binding, and I was looking for some input on boots. I am interested a little more in comfort than in responsiveness, but not enough, I don't think, to consider soft boots. Some have mentioned the Rossi XX, Salomon 1080, Solomon X Wave 8 and 9, and even the Nordica Beast. I have about a size 11, slightly narrow foot and sensitive shins. Softer plastic shells seem attractive. I only ski about 15 days a year, but I'm looking for a boot that could take me through college in the mountains.

1. Within reasonable proximity to Boulder, what is the best shop to buy boots?

2. If I were to ski one day, would Breck be open so that I could visit your shop? If so, what is the name?

3. If I buy boots one day, can I get them fitted at a totally different store months later?

4. What are your 2 cents on the boots mentioned above, and could you give a few more suggestions?

Much obliged,
Max Gosey, 16
Max,

The best place to look for boots in Colorado's fronge range area is actually in Boulder. It is Boulder Ski Deals, and Larry is the best person to talk to there.

My shop's name is Boot Fixation, and its phone number is 970-453-8546. I do all work by appointment, so you will want to call at least a week ahead for an appoinment. Remind me of your email if you do.

There is no reason why you cannot buy your boots at one shop and have them fitted at another.

Other thoughts- Softer boot flexes are great, but what are known as "soft boots" are terrible. I think you will like the Salomon 1080, which Boulder Ski Deals does carry.

Good Luck, Jeff
post #9 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by gk:
Jeff,

Background: Me - 5'9", 160lb, upper itermediate. Shoe size 11.5. Current boot is Salomon Evolution 7.0, size 28.5, I believe. Been skiing it for last 4 years, and fit is great, no pain or discomfort. Using the standard footbeds that came with it and no mods to the boot. Time for me to get something better.

1. I know from other posts, you don't like the Evo. Could you recommend boots with better flex/ski control that have similar fit to the Evo?

Thanks in advance,
Gary
Gary,

When buying ski equipment, you want to buy for the skier you want to become, not necessarily the one you are now. Why don't you email back something that gives me some sense of what your ski goals are- how you want to ski and what kind of trails you want to ski on. Also, let me know if your feet and calves are narrow, wide or average.

As far as your question goes, in my opinion the Salomon Evolution is a big clunky boot that does not hold the foot well. Lower level skiers who are heavy can do okay with it however. Give me more info and I will be happy to respond again.

Jeff
post #10 of 178
Quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Bergeron, Boot Fixation:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by gk:
Jeff,

Background: Me - 5'9", 160lb, upper itermediate. Shoe size 11.5. Current boot is Salomon Evolution 7.0, size 28.5, I believe. Been skiing it for last 4 years, and fit is great, no pain or discomfort. Using the standard footbeds that came with it and no mods to the boot. Time for me to get something better.

1. I know from other posts, you don't like the Evo. Could you recommend boots with better flex/ski control that have similar fit to the Evo?

Thanks in advance,
Gary
Gary,

When buying ski equipment, you want to buy for the skier you want to become, not necessarily the one you are now. Why don't you email back something that gives me some sense of what your ski goals are- how you want to ski and what kind of trails you want to ski on. Also, let me know if your feet and calves are narrow, wide or average.

As far as your question goes, in my opinion the Salomon Evolution is a big clunky boot that does not hold the foot well. Lower level skiers who are heavy can do okay with it however. Give me more info and I will be happy to respond again.

Jeff
</font>[/quote]See, I try to keep it short and I guess I leave out important details.

My ski goals: get to advanced/expert level, be able to ski (with some grace) anything on the mountain. I'm less interested in bumps and trees, other than surviving them, and no interest in pipes, rails, etc. No real interest now in heading OB. I ski mostly in the east, with a trip west every so often. 20-25 days/year. I guess I spend 10% ice, 10% groomed, 60% in crud/mix, 20% in powder. Currently I spend most of my time on the easier blacks, and want to progress to skiing the harder blacks.

One main reason I'm asking is that I've tried on a handful of other boots over the last few years (I don't remember specific models, but brands were Lange, Nordica, Technica, Rossi) and all of them were very uncomfortable. Usually in the arch and outside heel area. I don't know what this makes my foot...at this point, I just know the Evos feel good. If I had to guess, I'd say average calves, low arch/mild flatfooted, above average width.

While the Evo's are very comfortable, I do feel like they can slide around on my foot a bit when I hit rougher snow. One of the reasons I want someting new.

1. Same question as before. Based on what you know about the Evo's fit, can you make any recommendations that fit similarly but have better skiing qualities.

Thanks again.
Gary
post #11 of 178
Jeff- What do I do or tell my customers who have a high instep?

Nordica Smartech 8's - any good? pros and cons.

Where might I get a canting meauring devise? (to measure knee pronation and supation)only after installing footbeds such as SuperFeet of course.

I have fitted boots well for about 5+ years. Where might I find additional instruction and / or information that I might learn and do even a better job? Always wanting to learn. Bob
post #12 of 178
I had a separate post in this section but via recommendation from another member thought it should go in this thread as well....

NORDICA DOBI XS & S V. LANGE 130 V. SALOMON COURSE

I am in the market for boots again (I hate this part of skiing...skis are so much easier). I have been using my current stock Lange L10 Race w/ custom footbed for about 5 years. You could say I have a Lange foot. I have skied about 30 years and probably used Lange boots for the last 20 years. I have SL race, GS race and all-mtn skis. I train and race Masters but love those powder days when we get them.

Beyond what I read in the magazine reviews, what are your experiences with regards to:
-ski feel
-quickness
-forward lean
-edge control
-fit
-liner quality
-shell/buckle quality
-comparison between these boots

Thanks,

David
post #13 of 178
Quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Bergeron, Boot Fixation:
For the last year, I have been making regular contributions to this site. What I have been doing is answering ski boot questions, and my expertise comes from my 17 years of experience doing alignment, fitting and coaching. I own Boot Fixation in Breckenridge, CO, and I will be releasing a cutting edge book on ski technique sometime this summer (2004).

I think this is a great site and I have enjoyed answering people's question, but there a couple of changes I need to have happen for me to continue contributing. The problem is it is taking far too long for me to answer these questions, and I simply do not have the time. However, I think a few changes could serve everyone involved better.

Here are the ideas...

1. Formatting is extremely important- PLEASE START WITH ALL THE BACKGROUND INFORMATION. THEN AT THE END OF THE EMAIL, NUMBER EACH QUESTION YOU HAVE FOR ME AND KEEP THESE QUESTIONS TOGETHER. What has been happening is I have to sort through each email for the questions, which makes it very easy for me to miss some of the questions.

2. If you want to respond to a person's question, that is fine. There have been some good thoughts. Just keep your response short, three to four sentences maximum. If you need more room, contact the person privately, or start a new thread. It takes me too much time to sort these responses from questions, and sometimes I disagree with the responses. I do not have time to correct some of the long responses.

That is about it. I really enjoy being involved with Epic- it is definitely a great group of people. But if this format is not followed I simply will not have the time to respond to questions. I will just stop responding.

So please help me so I can help all of you. If this format is followed, I should be able to check the site at least every week, which is more often than I could last winter.

Also, sometimes it is easier to ask questions on the phone. You are welcome to call me at my shop with questions, as long as they are not too long. The number for Boot Fixation is 970-453-8546. I am even happy to call back if I am either not at the shop or just cannot talk.

Let's stay in touch,

Jeff Bergeron

CUSTOM BOOT FITTING SERVICES AND CUSTOM ORTHOTICS -- AMERICA'S BEST BOOTFITTERS

Check out Greg Hoffman's Ski Boot Fitting website for more...

post #14 of 178
Jeff,
Thanks for your input into this site. You're a great wealth of information, and I've certainly benefitted from reading what you've written to others.

I, like may others, am in the market for new boots. I'm 5'7" 150lbs Level 8 skier. I ski on 168cm Atomic R:EX and like to ski steeps, bumps and off piste almost exclusively out west (CO, UT, Tahoe). Sadly, I only ski 10-15 days a year. I've skied about 120 days total. I've achieved my current skiing level rather quickly through lessons and being pretty athletic. I ski with pretty good technique but of course fall into bad habits frequently. Consistency is a bit of an issue. I keep myself in relatively good shape so can compensate for my bad technique with some athleticism and good physical fitness.

My current boots do not fit well. I currently ski in Rossi Course X boots (dark red, a number of years old) size 25.0 and have custom insoles. There is too much room in the heel and ankle pocket and cause blisters on the back portion of my non-existant arches. I have an extremely flat foot, absolutely no arch. My foot is about 96mm wide so probably between B/C width. My foot is also thin from a top of instep to sole standpoint and pretty bony. I have narrow heels and thin ankles but muscular calves. My toes and long and thin with my 2nd toe slightly longer than my big toe. (Not a very good looking foot). I have short legs, 28" inseam (don't know if this matters).

With all the reading I've done I'd assume, due to my weight, height, level and skiing style, I'd probably be best in a boot that has a bit softer flex than the top of the line freeride boot. Some boots that seem to fit the bill are Lange Comp 100, Banshee 110, L8/AC8; Nordica W12 or W10; Salomon X Wave 9.0 or 8.0. So here are my questions:

1. Is this the correct level of performance I need or do I need a stiffer boot (Comp 120, Beast, X Wave 10, etc.)?
2. What boots specifically can you recommend given my foot description (either current or recent year's models)? I know this may be a more difficult question to answer given you cannot see my foot.

Thanks!

[ November 07, 2003, 02:42 PM: Message edited by: Prosper ]
post #15 of 178
Jeff,

My girlfriend needs to buy new boots. She is 1.60m tall and weights 50 kg (i think but i'm close) and is still using the snow-plow quite often so i can't tell you what her level is but i guess somewhere between beginner and low-intermediate. The problem is that her current boots are holding her back because she doesn't have the weight to flex them (she is skiing in Lange Anthea model black with a gel tongue). So she desperately needs softer boots. She can only buy Tecnica boots (i don't think that is a problem).I did some search on Entryx and Rival lines from Tecnica because the 7senses line is not available. Here are the questions:

1.What models from the Entryx or Rival lines do you reccomend taking into consideration the differences between these two lines and if you can't decide what model might be best please reccomend the best model from each line for her?
2.What flex index do you think might suit her better 50 or 60 (because 70 might be too much and when she will improve she can use the Anthea model)?
3.What flex index has the lange model?


Thanks.....
post #16 of 178
Hi Jeff,

BACKGROUND:
My left leg is 1.3cm shorter than my right (found it out recently while trying to diagnose knee problems). On my left leg, the tibia/fibula is about 3mm shorter than the right side, while the femur is 10mm shorter than on the right side.

QUESTION:
1) What can I do regarding boot sole modifications to correct this problem? My hips are not square and cannot rotate evenly in my current position-they move very freely to the left, but movement is restricted when moving the hips to the right.

THOUGHTS:
My initial thought was that I need a lift on my left boot sole. What should the size of this lift be? For example, if I put a full 1.3cm lift on my boot sole, my hips will be square when I am standing upright. But, my knees won't be at the same level (remember that most of my leg length discrepancy is above the knee). This would put my left knee 10mm above my right knee. But, when my left leg is flexed to a high degree, I still won't have square hips. Looking in the mirror, it is obvious that without an even leg length, my pelvis is not aligned correctly in a horizontal plane, as well as the obvious vertical plane.. My hip movements feel far more comfortable when moving to the right than when moving to the left-my left turns are much less powerful than my right turns. What are some modifications I can make, if any?

Thanks for the help!

Full selection of 2015 skis available right now from Dawgcatching.com.  PM for current deals and discount codes: save up to 25% on mid-season deals. 

post #17 of 178
Hi Jeff -
We're stumped on Boot Selection for a novice female with narrow feet, high arches. My fiancee. Getting cold feet is a concern: her circulation seems to get pinched in tight fits in even her inline skates, leading to cold, numb feet.

Her Stats:
She weighs 115 lbs, is 5'5".
Rollerblades well, but has skied only 1 time in last 5 years.
Her foot length measures 236 cm.
Her heel measures 55 cm across.
The ball of her foot is 80 cm across.
Her ankle radius measures 22 cm at the bone.
She has high arches.

One shop recommended a soft flexing entry level Salomon, while another recommended a stiffer int/advanced Lange boot. All boots were shell fit to two fingers.

Fit History:
- In a Lange CRL80, size 23.5 (283mm), wth Superfeet(green) insoles for 20 minutes in a shop: Uncomfortable pain on her ankle bone and on the top of her foot. The forward lean killed her calves.

- In a Rossi Saphir ST, size 24 MP (280 mm) for 20 minutes in a shop: numb toes, her foot went to sleep.

- In a Salomon Performa 5.0, size 24.5 (286mm) for 20 minutes in a shop: the most comfortable. However, we have concerns that the lining will pack out and her narrow foot will swim in the Salomon shell.

Questions:
1) We were told Lange makes the best boot for her narrow foot type, does this seem true? Is there a novice level Lange for her?

2) What is a good flex level for her?

3) Can you please recommend an appropriate boot for her? Any make and model.

Thanks!

[ November 10, 2003, 02:06 PM: Message edited by: Tigerpaw ]
post #18 of 178
Jeff, hello and thanks in advance for taking the time to look through and answer this post.

Background: I am a level 7 skier. I ski about 60-70% on piste (preferably blacks) but I'm seeking more offpiste action. I found out that my current boots, Nordica GP, were too large by 1 or 1.5 sizes and that (plus buckling them too tight) is what I think gave me serious cramps. My correct size is 26.5-27.

I tried:
Salomon X-Wave 9, size 27: these were fine everywhere except over my instep - buckling them even at the lowest notch cut off all circulation in my feet. Especially the right foot. Size 26.5 even worse.

Lange Comp 100, size 27: great fit, but the boot is so flexible forward (flex 100, they say?) that when I lean forward the plastic of the cuff 'cuts' into my instep and again hurts.

Lange Comp 120, size 26.5 and 27: very good fit including the instep, although I had been expecting them to be far too narrow. Unfortunately, more expensive than the others.

Atomic CR 11: great fit in size 26.5 except my toes felt they needed an extra milimeter or two of length to relax. In size 27 however, my forefoot was wobbling a bit too much.

My conclusions: I have a medium forefoot, possibly wide toes, high instep esp. on the right foot and medium ankle fit.

Questions:

1. Based on all this, any other boots (for advanced, not race/expert skiers) you would recommend?

2. Most of the boots in these ranges have heat moulded liners, which I understand are not a great idea. However, I won't have the funds to get custom/foam-injected liners. (I will get custom footbeds, though). Any comments? (can I replace the heat-moulded liners later with custom-made ones)?

[ November 11, 2003, 02:37 PM: Message edited by: Cedric ]
post #19 of 178
Jeff,

Thanks if you reply to this, rather kind of you.
Background
21 yrs skiing, 6'3", 235, recreational racer, 3 time qualifier for Nastar Nationals 18-25, two -time medalist. Spend a lot of days training with various local programs and also running Nastar.
I've upgraded this year to a few more serious race products, namely a Salomon X2 boot and new S-lab GS 185's.
Run Superfeet in my boots and wear an older pair in my running shoes.
Have anough experience to grind my own boots etc, but would like to know the folowing:

1: Is the price of a boot-sole lift, justified in the performance for someone with 1 degree or less of pronation?

2: If so would you recommend 3 or 5mm lifts?

3: With a fis Salomon 916, would you mount them flat to the Salomon GS Plate or with a small riser, if so how much?

Thanks,

CD77 [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #20 of 178
wow - jeff... you've got your hands full with all of this free advice-giving!! what a service!

I wanted to comment to EasternSkiBum. One of the boots you reccomended is the boot I ski and I LOVE LOVE LOVE it!!!!!

Rossi Power 9.1j (yes, the junior boot is better for me because the cuff is shorter and I have larger calves). The fit is amazing (my foot is flat - wide at front and narrow at heel) and it accomodates my custom foot beds niceley.

The "reverse overlap" concept seems to work - or maybe it's that the boot is comfy enough to wear REALLY tight?? At any rate it immediately improved my skiing. It's not as warm as other boots I have worn, but that'a factor of it being so tight, also.

thanks again, jeff!

kiersten

PS. Easternskibum - there are some local bootfitters who are REALLY great...I have worked with them all...

Jerome at Wachusett Mtn Ski Shop (got me into my current Rossis)

Paul Richelson - owns his own shop in Plymouth, NH (made my custom footbeds)

Gary Lajoie at Joe Jones in Campton, NH (used to teach with him at Waterville Valley and get him to tinker with my boots and skiing)
post #21 of 178
Jeff, Let's see if you can work a miracle.
I have never really had a perfect fitting boot. I learned to live with pain because I love the sport. I'm 37 started skiing at the age of 7. I would consider myself a Very Good skier and I like the steeps but avoid the bumps due to my knees(football). I have for years only used rear entry because they don't pinch my leg. My current boots ..Solomon 93 Force size 355/28.5
I'm 5'7 , 245 lbs.. my shoe is a 10.5 EEE. Now this is the tuff part my calf's measure 20 inches around and starts to taper out 9 inches up from the bottom of my foot. I have flat feet and wear orthotics. Every year I look at what's new hoping to find a boot with no success. Can you help.
post #22 of 178
Keili.... thanks for the encouragement. My bootfitter is Brian E. at the Ski Center. One of the best in the business anywhere. I was in the shop yesterday and I'll relate what we found.

Nordica W- we had high hopes for this one. Wonderful liner, comfortable wide toebox, nice heel pocket, the forward lean was so extreme for me that they put me on my toes in a "nuetral stance". Now, another woman with much thinner calves thought these boots were terrific, just a little too wide for her. So I'm not knocking the boot. Just not for me.

I tried your beloved Rossi Power 70, I'm too heavy for a junior boot to work. Great overall stance, flex, also too snug for my foot... overall. I need a little more volume everywhere, especially the calf and forefoot.

The solly x wave.... great upright stance, snug fit, a little stiff flexing (8), needs to be ground or stretched just a smidge on the left to accommodate my width. Good heel hold. So.... the solly won.

[ November 12, 2003, 03:32 PM: Message edited by: EasternSkiBum ]
post #23 of 178
hi jeff,
try to be sort:
POINTS
1.no boot fitter where i live
2.100kgr agressive skier
3.skied always with hard boots(Grand Prix-nordica)with no probl.
4.last year got SALOMON Crossmax 10.0 race boots-at end of season couldnt ski or even walk with those boots.CAUSEn both legs under the unkle,and over the chamber:i have a litle bone that excels

question
1.i have 2 otions on boots A:tecnica Icon or the Hot form model
B:ROSSIGNOL SOFT 1 boots.(my only consideration is that the softs might be rather litle for me)(I DONT HAVE THE ABILITY TO TRY THEM)

PLEASE HELP IM COMFUSED-WHAT DO YOU INSIST?
really thnx
post #24 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Prosper:
Jeff,
Thanks for your input into this site. You're a great wealth of information, and I've certainly benefitted from reading what you've written to others.

I, like may others, am in the market for new boots. I'm 5'7" 150lbs Level 8 skier. I ski on 168cm Atomic R:EX and like to ski steeps, bumps and off piste almost exclusively out west (CO, UT, Tahoe). Sadly, I only ski 10-15 days a year. I've skied about 120 days total. I've achieved my current skiing level rather quickly through lessons and being pretty athletic. I ski with pretty good technique but of course fall into bad habits frequently. Consistency is a bit of an issue. I keep myself in relatively good shape so can compensate for my bad technique with some athleticism and good physical fitness.

My current boots do not fit well. I currently ski in Rossi Course X boots (dark red, a number of years old) size 25.0 and have custom insoles. There is too much room in the heel and ankle pocket and cause blisters on the back portion of my non-existant arches. I have an extremely flat foot, absolutely no arch. My foot is about 96mm wide so probably between B/C width. My foot is also thin from a top of instep to sole standpoint and pretty bony. I have narrow heels and thin ankles but muscular calves. My toes and long and thin with my 2nd toe slightly longer than my big toe. (Not a very good looking foot). I have short legs, 28" inseam (don't know if this matters).

With all the reading I've done I'd assume, due to my weight, height, level and skiing style, I'd probably be best in a boot that has a bit softer flex than the top of the line freeride boot. Some boots that seem to fit the bill are Lange Comp 100, Banshee 110, L8/AC8; Nordica W12 or W10; Salomon X Wave 9.0 or 8.0. So here are my questions:

1. Is this the correct level of performance I need or do I need a stiffer boot (Comp 120, Beast, X Wave 10, etc.)?
2. What boots specifically can you recommend given my foot description (either current or recent year's models)? I know this may be a more difficult question to answer given you cannot see my foot.

Thanks!
Prosper

You do not list your weight, but the boots you listed above will probably work well for most men who weight less than 190 lbs. Still, flex is a very personal issue, so you ultimately have to decide what feels right to you.

As far as the boots go, the Langes are the narrowest in the heel and the Salomon's are the widest. The Lange does have a fairly high instep, however. You may also want to try the Lange 120 LF (low fit), which is narrower still and still easy to flex.

Two other boots you could consider are the Tecnica XT17 and the Kneissl Flexon Original (formerly Raichle). This Tecnica is a real race boot, and can require a fair amount of fitting. The Kneissl can be very hard to find, and both boots flex very well.

Jeff
post #25 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by gk:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Jeff Bergeron, Boot Fixation:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by gk:
Jeff,

Background: Me - 5'9", 160lb, upper itermediate. Shoe size 11.5. Current boot is Salomon Evolution 7.0, size 28.5, I believe. Been skiing it for last 4 years, and fit is great, no pain or discomfort. Using the standard footbeds that came with it and no mods to the boot. Time for me to get something better.

1. I know from other posts, you don't like the Evo. Could you recommend boots with better flex/ski control that have similar fit to the Evo?

Thanks in advance,
Gary
Gary,

When buying ski equipment, you want to buy for the skier you want to become, not necessarily the one you are now. Why don't you email back something that gives me some sense of what your ski goals are- how you want to ski and what kind of trails you want to ski on. Also, let me know if your feet and calves are narrow, wide or average.

As far as your question goes, in my opinion the Salomon Evolution is a big clunky boot that does not hold the foot well. Lower level skiers who are heavy can do okay with it however. Give me more info and I will be happy to respond again.

Jeff</font>[/quote]See, I try to keep it short and I guess I leave out important details.

My ski goals: get to advanced/expert level, be able to ski (with some grace) anything on the mountain. I'm less interested in bumps and trees, other than surviving them, and no interest in pipes, rails, etc. No real interest now in heading OB. I ski mostly in the east, with a trip west every so often. 20-25 days/year. I guess I spend 10% ice, 10% groomed, 60% in crud/mix, 20% in powder. Currently I spend most of my time on the easier blacks, and want to progress to skiing the harder blacks.

One main reason I'm asking is that I've tried on a handful of other boots over the last few years (I don't remember specific models, but brands were Lange, Nordica, Technica, Rossi) and all of them were very uncomfortable. Usually in the arch and outside heel area. I don't know what this makes my foot...at this point, I just know the Evos feel good. If I had to guess, I'd say average calves, low arch/mild flatfooted, above average width.

While the Evo's are very comfortable, I do feel like they can slide around on my foot a bit when I hit rougher snow. One of the reasons I want someting new.

1. Same question as before. Based on what you know about the Evo's fit, can you make any recommendations that fit similarly but have better skiing qualities.

Thanks again.
Gary
</font>[/quote]Gary,

What you seem to like is a blocky, loose fit. Ideally, you could fit into a boot that holds your foot better. I am wondering if there is something peculiar about your heel shape that requires extra room. If this is the case, most average boots (not wide or narrow) could be made to fit with some grinding of the shell. To know this I would have to see you in person. Any good bootfitter can do this work for you, but good luck finding the right person.

If you must go with the wider fit, the Tecnica Rival series is about as wide of a boot as you can find. You may also like the the Head FR 10.5 or 8.5 in the 103mm shell.

Lastly, since you are skiing all types of conditions, make sure the boots flex fairly easily.

Jeff
post #26 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by redcarver:
Jeff,

My girlfriend needs to buy new boots. She is 1.60m tall and weights 50 kg (i think but i'm close) and is still using the snow-plow quite often so i can't tell you what her level is but i guess somewhere between beginner and low-intermediate. The problem is that her current boots are holding her back because she doesn't have the weight to flex them (she is skiing in Lange Anthea model black with a gel tongue). So she desperately needs softer boots. She can only buy Tecnica boots (i don't think that is a problem).I did some search on Entryx and Rival lines from Tecnica because the 7senses line is not available. Here are the questions:

1.What models from the Entryx or Rival lines do you reccomend taking into consideration the differences between these two lines and if you can't decide what model might be best please reccomend the best model from each line for her?
2.What flex index do you think might suit her better 50 or 60 (because 70 might be too much and when she will improve she can use the Anthea model)?
3.What flex index has the lange model?


Thanks.....
Redcarver,

In my opinion, the Lange Anthea was a truly terrible boot, so probably anything you buy will be an improvement. Both the Entryx and the Rival are decent boots for her level of skiing, although the former may not be enough boot as she progresses. Both are very wide, so they be too big for performance skiing.

I do not pay much attention to the flex indexes of lower level boots, because their poor quality plastic prohibits good flexing. I would just check and make sure she can get at least some flex from the upper cuff of the boot.

Are you asking me what the flex index of the Lange Anthea is? If so, it would have probably been given a rating of 70-90, despite the fact that it really cannot be flexed. A more accurate rating would have been 220, or stiffer than any race boot.

Jeff
post #27 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by dawgcatching:
Hi Jeff,

BACKGROUND:
My left leg is 1.3cm shorter than my right (found it out recently while trying to diagnose knee problems). On my left leg, the tibia/fibula is about 3mm shorter than the right side, while the femur is 10mm shorter than on the right side.

QUESTION:
1) What can I do regarding boot sole modifications to correct this problem? My hips are not square and cannot rotate evenly in my current position-they move very freely to the left, but movement is restricted when moving the hips to the right.

THOUGHTS:
My initial thought was that I need a lift on my left boot sole. What should the size of this lift be? For example, if I put a full 1.3cm lift on my boot sole, my hips will be square when I am standing upright. But, my knees won't be at the same level (remember that most of my leg length discrepancy is above the knee). This would put my left knee 10mm above my right knee. But, when my left leg is flexed to a high degree, I still won't have square hips. Looking in the mirror, it is obvious that without an even leg length, my pelvis is not aligned correctly in a horizontal plane, as well as the obvious vertical plane.. My hip movements feel far more comfortable when moving to the right than when moving to the left-my left turns are much less powerful than my right turns. What are some modifications I can make, if any?

Thanks for the help!
dawgcatching,

Since I am not a medical person, all of the following information is solely based on my experience with skiing. 1.3 cm of leg length difference is large enough that you probably need some correction. Assuming that this measurement is correct, most medical people I consult with recommend starting at a 50% correction (approx 6mm). Over time you can increase this, but probably no higher than 80% (approx 10mm). You may also want to try correcting the height in your shoes.

I recommend the extra height is added to the boot sole, not inside the boot. For shoes, you can just add heel lift to the shoes.

Do not expect to get your hips level immediately. Also, be sure that the difference is in the legs and not coming from the hips being out of position.

Jeff
post #28 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Tigerpaw:
Hi Jeff -
We're stumped on Boot Selection for a novice female with narrow feet, high arches. My fiancee. Getting cold feet is a concern: her circulation seems to get pinched in tight fits in even her inline skates, leading to cold, numb feet.

Her Stats:
She weighs 115 lbs, is 5'5".
Rollerblades well, but has skied only 1 time in last 5 years.
Her foot length measures 236 cm.
Her heel measures 55 cm across.
The ball of her foot is 80 cm across.
Her ankle radius measures 22 cm at the bone.
She has high arches.

One shop recommended a soft flexing entry level Salomon, while another recommended a stiffer int/advanced Lange boot. All boots were shell fit to two fingers.

Fit History:
- In a Lange CRL80, size 23.5 (283mm), wth Superfeet(green) insoles for 20 minutes in a shop: Uncomfortable pain on her ankle bone and on the top of her foot. The forward lean killed her calves.

- In a Rossi Saphir ST, size 24 MP (280 mm) for 20 minutes in a shop: numb toes, her foot went to sleep.

- In a Salomon Performa 5.0, size 24.5 (286mm) for 20 minutes in a shop: the most comfortable. However, we have concerns that the lining will pack out and her narrow foot will swim in the Salomon shell.

Questions:
1) We were told Lange makes the best boot for her narrow foot type, does this seem true? Is there a novice level Lange for her?

2) What is a good flex level for her?

3) Can you please recommend an appropriate boot for her? Any make and model.

Thanks!
Tigerpaw,

1. The Lange boots are good for narrower feet, but they do have quite a bit of forward lean. I do not recommend any of the novice level Langes, however.

2. The CRL 80 should be fine.

3. I think you should try the Rossignol Power 70L. It is more upright than the Lange, although not quite as narrow. There is nothing else I recommend she tries.

4. I do not like the Salomon Performa or the Rossi Saphir.

Jeff
post #29 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Cedric:
Jeff, hello and thanks in advance for taking the time to look through and answer this post.

Background: I am a level 7 skier. I ski about 60-70% on piste (preferably blacks) but I'm seeking more offpiste action. I found out that my current boots, Nordica GP, were too large by 1 or 1.5 sizes and that (plus buckling them too tight) is what I think gave me serious cramps. My correct size is 26.5-27.

I tried:
Salomon X-Wave 9, size 27: these were fine everywhere except over my instep - buckling them even at the lowest notch cut off all circulation in my feet. Especially the right foot. Size 26.5 even worse.

Lange Comp 100, size 27: great fit, but the boot is so flexible forward (flex 100, they say?) that when I lean forward the plastic of the cuff 'cuts' into my instep and again hurts.

Lange Comp 120, size 26.5 and 27: very good fit including the instep, although I had been expecting them to be far too narrow. Unfortunately, more expensive than the others.

Atomic CR 11: great fit in size 26.5 except my toes felt they needed an extra milimeter or two of length to relax. In size 27 however, my forefoot was wobbling a bit too much.

My conclusions: I have a medium forefoot, possibly wide toes, high instep esp. on the right foot and medium ankle fit.

Questions:

1. Based on all this, any other boots (for advanced, not race/expert skiers) you would recommend?

2. Most of the boots in these ranges have heat moulded liners, which I understand are not a great idea. However, I won't have the funds to get custom/foam-injected liners. (I will get custom footbeds, though). Any comments? (can I replace the heat-moulded liners later with custom-made ones)?
Cedric,

1. Basically, you need a boot fitter. You are looking for a tight yet comfortable fit, and it is very unlikely that you will achieve it without some modification to the boots. You could also try the Rossignol Pro 9.1 or 9.2 or the B1.

2. Heat molded liners are neither a significant help or detriment. I do not think it is likely that you need full custom liners such as foam liners.

Jeff
post #30 of 178
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by CaddtDaddy77:
Jeff,

Thanks if you reply to this, rather kind of you.
Background
21 yrs skiing, 6'3", 235, recreational racer, 3 time qualifier for Nastar Nationals 18-25, two -time medalist. Spend a lot of days training with various local programs and also running Nastar.
I've upgraded this year to a few more serious race products, namely a Salomon X2 boot and new S-lab GS 185's.
Run Superfeet in my boots and wear an older pair in my running shoes.
Have anough experience to grind my own boots etc, but would like to know the folowing:

1: Is the price of a boot-sole lift, justified in the performance for someone with 1 degree or less of pronation?

2: If so would you recommend 3 or 5mm lifts?

3: With a fis Salomon 916, would you mount them flat to the Salomon GS Plate or with a small riser, if so how much?

Thanks,

CD77 [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
CD77,

1. Boot lifters will make no significant improvement to Nastar racing, but they do help USSA and FIS racing. Basically, they help your carving at higher speeds and forces. They do make it easier to cant the boots, if you know what you are doing.

2. 3mm lifts tend to not be durable, so I would go with 5's.

3. Binding ramp depends on the needs of the skier, and is a lengthy explanation.

Jeff
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Expert Boot Advice given by Jeff, Boot Fixation