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Summer boardsports for snowboarders: work what you've got

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi all, 

 

Just thinking of how people on this board might be interested in transferring their snowboarding skills into another summer boardsport. This summer I started to longboard, and also got more serious about kiteboarding. It's been fascinating seeing how these sports relate (or don't relate) to each other.

 

I've found that longboarding downhill is really similar to snowboarding. It seems that the same 5 skills from snowboarding (stance&balance, edging, pivoting, pressure control, timing&coordination) continue to be relevant to longboarding, although to different degrees. Also, it's probably fair to say that snowboarders will have a quick learning progression on a longboard. Here's an example of longboarding slalom turns:  

 

 

In contrast, while learning to kiteboard, I've felt almost no benefit from being a snowboarder. It's like a French+Spanish speaker trying to learn Japanese: some of the parts exist between the two, but the structure is competely different and some of your existing knowledge can actually create roadblocks. While the same skills from snowboarding continue to exist in kiteboarding, their application is significantly different. E.g. if you kiteboard with a snowboarding stance, you are going into the drink! I get the impression that wakeboarding is much more similar to kiteboarding. 

 

Does anyone else have other boardsports experiences, similar or different? 

post #2 of 16

I've always inline skated in the off season to keep my ski balance and ski muscles in tune, but this year I switched to aggressive inline. My kids are starting to venture into the park, so I committed to follow them in next season. Aggressive inline is proving to be very mentally and physically challenging, but I should have the best fore/aft balance ever by the end of the summer. Never thought I'd be jumping gaps, dropping in and grinding rails at my age, but you've got to play young to stay young.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi shoebag,

 

Good that you discovered another discipline of inline skating. Hope you're wearing crash pad shorts; it's really unpleasant to fall on your back in a bowl! Epicski has covered inline a lot in the ski forums along with ice skating, skiking, and even nordic walking... 

 

I'm hoping to encourage dialogue about crossover boardsports... (this is the snowboarding forum after all!) Anyone have boardsport stories?

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Hi shoebag,

 

I'm hoping to encourage dialogue about crossover boardsports... (this is the snowboarding forum after all!) Anyone have boardsport stories?

 

Yup, skateboarders don't like inline skaters in their parks either.

post #5 of 16

Fruitbooters!tongue.gif

 

Actual skates are closer though IMHO.  Ice skates>Inline skates for skiing feel.

 

I've skateboarded off and on since forever

The Techniski is the best/closest thing to skiing on 4 wheels. It's really more a good drill for working the inside edges of the inside skis though.

 

post #6 of 16

Pivoting is an interesting one.  Both different boards and trucks, and different wheel choices, play a huge degree in how much a skateboard will or won't slide.  Sliding can be a good thing, or not, depending on how you're skating.  For both skating and riding, some of the best athletes out there do in fact slide a lot, though sometimes it can be a subtle thing. 

 

Metaphor's video in the first post also shows a very active upper body, which for that type of skating can be a very useful thing.  On snow, that active an upper body can be difficult to manage.  One fun thing on skates is to play around with different types of flatland pump: e.g.,only ankle pump, then only lower-body pump, then even trying only upper-body pump.  It can be a great workout, and then being able to isolate the different types of pump input can help when you put it back together.  Likewise, on transition, i.e. on curved 3d surfaces you can pump off of, there are different ways to pump and it can be helpful to play with them.

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

CTKook, I've been thinking about your comments of upper body rotation in longboarding versus snowboarding. So far when riding downhill I've been steering my longboard by turning through the lower joints and edging, which is how I try to snowboard. When pumping on flats, I'm using some upper body rotation in combination with aggressive edging. It seems like upper body rotation helps create much more torque to drive the board forward.

 

I wonder if upper body rotation is OK in longboarding but not good in snowboarding because of the different surface characteristics between the two sports? (Concrete versus snow)

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

CTKook, I've been thinking about your comments of upper body rotation in longboarding versus snowboarding. So far when riding downhill I've been steering my longboard by turning through the lower joints and edging, which is how I try to snowboard. When pumping on flats, I'm using some upper body rotation in combination with aggressive edging. It seems like upper body rotation helps create much more torque to drive the board forward.

 

I wonder if upper body rotation is OK in longboarding but not good in snowboarding because of the different surface characteristics between the two sports? (Concrete versus snow)

I think that's right, along with the differences in terrain.  Even the urethane you're running for your wheels can have a big impact on how much upper body input you can manage, as can speed you are carrying and the particular cone set or other defined turn shape you are trying for.

post #9 of 16

http://mallisonwhat.com/2013/01/15/rodney-mullens-no-stance-goal-is-lofty-for-the-rest-of-us-no-more-switch-mongo/  Fun read on Rodney Mullen, hip rehab and the effect on his skating stance.  Also applicable to an extent to snowboard stance and spending time work on things switch, though obviously snowboarding doesn' t give the same freedom of movement as skating. 

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

I think I might have to give up longboarding :/ a few weeks ago while riding, I encountered a gray bike pedal on the road that I didn't see against the gray road. My board stopped, but my body kept moving, and I ended up on concrete with a sprained ankle that's still healing. I'd like to think on inlines that even if I ran into such a thing, I'd fall onto my other foot and ride it out. These wide longboard wheels just seem to stop if they hit anything large-ish. 

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

... I encountered a gray bike pedal... I'd like to think on inlines that even if I ran into such a thing, I'd fall onto my other foot and ride it out. These wide longboard wheels just seem to stop if they hit anything large-ish.

It's probably true that inlines are a bit more forgiving for that type of thing, though obviously you can't run things out on inlines.  For smaller pebbles and twigs, they do get a bit less disruptive to balance on a longboard over time, though.  To me it's an interesting proprioceptive thing, because it's not like people go out and train running over twigs and pebbles intentionally, but they just end up stopping your wheels less frequently.

post #12 of 16

Street Snakes!

 

I got a skateboard with a middle wheel to let it skid like a snowboard, but I have not used it yet. I wonder how that would do?

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Street Snakes!

 

I got a skateboard with a middle wheel to let it skid like a snowboard, but I have not used it yet. I wonder how that would do?

I thought about getting one of those to help me learn to slide and drift.  I think it mostly depends on how soft or hard your wheels are, harder wheels skid better.  You don't really need the middle wheel.  Get some knee pads and gloves with pucks.

 

 

post #14 of 16

I don't know if my longboard will do that on my roads. I do know that my dentist would love to find out. The board with the extra wheel in the center for skidding looks 100% saner.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

Street Snakes!

I got a skateboard with a middle wheel to let it skid like a snowboard, but I have not used it yet. I wonder how that would do?

I found a T-board, which is basically a caster setup [sp?] without the skateboard trucks that are added on the Freebord, to be pretty forgiving in that regard. But, not much fun on the flats or uphill or in the park. I got rid of it only because I found I was riding a bike more when I wanted that railed feeling on asphalt/

Let us know how the Freebord goes.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post
 

It's probably true that inlines are a bit more forgiving for that type of thing, though obviously you can't run things out on inlines.  For smaller pebbles and twigs, they do get a bit less disruptive to balance on a longboard over time, though.  To me it's an interesting proprioceptive thing, because it's not like people go out and train running over twigs and pebbles intentionally, but they just end up stopping your wheels less frequently.

 

I can see that for pebbles and twigs - particularly as people ramp up their speed. That said, I can't imagine my longboard being able to roll over a grippy rubber bike pedal on the road, no matter how good the rider...

 

How do you deal with ugly curbs? 

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