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How many ski areas have you been to that no longer exist? - Page 4

post #91 of 166

I didn't see that anyone had included the online list of the Northwest's "lost ski areas":   http://lostskiareas.wikispaces.com/

 

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #92 of 166

NELSAP (New England Lost Ski Areas Project) has lists of lost ski areas for each of the New England states.  They also list closed areas that have re-opened.  

 

They have a web page for each area, which includes old trail maps and recollections by members of what the area was like back when it was open.  NELSAP also has an active forum.

 

Here's their list for New Hampshire:  http://www.nelsap.org/nh/nh.html

and here's the forum:  http://www.snowjournal.com/nelsapforum.html

post #93 of 166

All I can think of is Satus Pass in Washington (lodge burned and no one ever rebuilt), and Spout Springs in Oregon, very small with T-bars and short chairlifts.

 

This probably does not count but twice I skied the tramway at Wallowa Lake, once doing laps top to bottom (about 4,000 vertical ) and once skied the top area with Sno-Cat used to transport back up hill, but I understand they won't do that anymore.

post #94 of 166

Just one for me that was already mentioned by JamesJ, Cherokee in Linden, VA.  The place was open for two, maybe three seasons and they were some of the worst seasons for snow that we had in the area.  Even if we had good snow, I'm not sure if it would have made it.  That had three slopes, each with its own lift.  One of the slopes was a short bunny hill/learning area.  The other two joined to make one real long trail.  Both were rated intermediate, but neither were that difficult.  And while they only had three trails, their lift tickets were more expensive than other ski areas in close driving distance to DC.

 

It feels sad to see any ski area close, but Cherokee wasn't planned well from the start.  It really seemed built to fail.

post #95 of 166

The following for me; Maryland: Braddock Heights, Oregon Ridge - Pa: Laurel Mt, Split Rock  Va: Skyline ( it had different names also ), Shawneeland  WVa: Cabin Mountain Colorado: Hidden Valley, Berthoud Pass, Geneva Basin Vt: Roundtop, Haystack

post #96 of 166

erdz, Laurel Mountain is not dead or lost. It's just a zombie.

post #97 of 166

Tip of the hat to Chadds Peak, ripped an edge off of my Northlands snagging a rock, but saw a great Warren Miller flick there!

post #98 of 166

Fahnestock, NY

Highmont, NY

Scotch Valley, NY

Cortina Valley, NY

West Mtn, NY

College Hill,NY

Dutchess/Beacon,NY

Simpsons/Phoenicia,NY

Brodie,MA

Jug End,MA

post #99 of 166

I hope these two area are new to the list

 

Diamond Hill, RI

Pine Top, RI

 

There are two more in RI one that I did ski one due it was already closed the other was Ski Valley I never skied there

 

 

The great thing is the most southern area ( Yawgoo ) is still open and doing ok.

 

Hank

post #100 of 166

All the ones you mentioned and more, including

Prospect

Roundtop

Dutch Hill

Carinthia

Snow Valley

post #101 of 166

cool thread, although I have to admit to never having heard of 75% (or more) of the resorts listed here.

:)

 

it's rather sychronistic, too, in terms of the timing of this thread, as just the other day I spent a fair amount of time digging around the Webz to find defunct ski areas in Northern California. found quite a few in the Lassen area, that either once were, were planned but never built, or once were and have been trying to re-open for some time, but to no avail. kind of a strange, beguiling history if you think about it. kind of sad, as well, to think about the prolific nature of the sport and the more mom/pop hills that are now only memories. 

 

also, the proliferation of East Coast resorts that are now just memories, is interesting. Although I do recall an old issue of SKI Magazine that had a cover story about New York state having the most ski areas per capita of any state in the U.S. (this issue was at least 20 years old, btw).

 

while i never skied it when it was open, there's Iron Mountain off of Hwy 88, just west of Kirkwood. a few summers ago a buddy and i hiked around the property and they still had the lodge standing (though it's pretty dilapidated) and all the lifts were still strung with chairs. not sure what the status is these days, but it was kind of cool to experience a ghost resort. (found this Googling: http://www.epicski.com/t/82323/photos-of-abandoned-iron-mountain-ca-ski-area)

 

not sure if anybody answered the Granlibakken query that was posed on page 1, but this is what the website says: http://www.granlibakken.com/ski_snowplay.php

 

$750 to rent the hill for the day for private skiing seems pretty resonable (if you got like 100 people together)...

 

:)

post #102 of 166

Mines a pretty short list, but has two that I believe no one else has mentioned:

 

Emerald Mountain -- this was the area just behind Howelson Hill in Steamboat.  I had my first ski day there when I was 3.  Too bad it took another 8 years before I skied again...

Happy Jack -- this area was between Cheyenne and Laramie, WY.  I learned to ski here.

Hidden Valley -- I skied once here in the late 1970's.

 

Mike

post #103 of 166

Lots of Fun!! Got me to post. I've skied many lost Nelsap.org areas after the fact. This is a list of the areas I've skied while open.

 

Fahnestock State Park ( first place I've skied)

Mt Tom- Holyoke Ma

Berkshire Snow Basin

Brodie Mountain

Haystack

Timber Ridge

Ascutney

Bear Creek/Round Top

post #104 of 166

apparently, at one time, there was a WELSAP site, but now just a single page is archived at the Way Back machine:

 

http://web.archive.org/web/20041223161348/http://www.geocities.com/welsap/ncal_lost_ski_areas

post #105 of 166

Arrowhead in Marlboro, NJ.

 

http://tinyurl.com/kmo6kjy

 

 

 
post #106 of 166

Brodie (MA)

 

In my Jr high school (middle school for those of you who aren't fossils) days, Willburgers Ski Shop (long gone), gave out a "Ski" map of the immediate tri-state area, a friend used to post it on his wall and put pins/little flags in all of the areas he'd been to. I wasn't as well traveled, found a few ski areas i liked and stuck with them.


Edited by neonorchid - 7/10/13 at 9:07pm
post #107 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Miles View Post

Mt. Pilchuck in Washington. Only skied there once and thought it was better than the Snowqualmie areas (Alpental didn't exist yet), but not as good as Stevens.

Where was this? When did it close?

 

EDIT: Nevermind, I did myself a google search and found info on it. I had never heard of either this one or Yodelin. Not old enough.

 

Kind of makes you wonder if there is a market for a new north Cascades ski area....I am guessing there probably isn't, but it would be nice to alleviate some of the weekend crowds at Stevens...


Edited by SkiingCoug - 7/10/13 at 9:55pm
post #108 of 166

Ascutney, VT

 

I never liked it anyway.

post #109 of 166

Here is a wiki of all the lost ski areas of Washington:

 

http://lostskiareas.wikispaces.com/Washington

post #110 of 166

not to drift off into a debate about global warming, but i found it interesting that most of the lost ski areas of California were at much lower elevations than the ones still operating today. did they get more snow back in the '50s and '60s or were the areas chosen for ease in terms of accessibility at the time?

post #111 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post

not to drift off into a debate about global warming, but i found it interesting that most of the lost ski areas of California were at much lower elevations than the ones still operating today. did they get more snow back in the '50s and '60s or were the areas chosen for ease in terms of accessibility at the time?

 

I suspect that global warming has had little to do with the many closings of smaller ski areas across the country, and it's more about the other operational challenges of operating smaller "community" ski areas. Back in the day few ski areas had extensive snowmaking, and certainly not the smaller ones that were really more about putting skiing very close to the skiing population, and doing so at very reasonable cost (even if it wasn't the most challenging skiing available). Heck, skiing proficiency in general was never as good as it is today, so there was a lot more general interest in smaller scale skiing. Also, back then real estate expenses (or equivalent expense if unowned land) and insurance premiums associated with ski areas weren't such a big factor as today. Finally, the larger areas kept becoming larger and larger by virtue of being able to offer more and more to skiing families - including extensive snowmaking which made for more consistent conditions. In my opinion all of these factors contributed to the closings of smaller areas.

post #112 of 166

^^^Perhaps, but if what you say is true it would be pretty easy for investors with deeper pockets and bigger economies of scale to step in and take over several of those operations, making them more profitable.  Why hasn't that happened?  I can attest to several places where natural snow was prevalent enough to cover trails for at least two months a year but no longer more than two weeks lately, the lost resorts of Long Island come to mind.  The decision to dump dollars in to a ski area where it no longer snows seems to be a much bigger business consideration/risk than all of those other analysis factors combined,

post #113 of 166
Without intending to get political and 'in your face' about it, I believe that climate change has impacted these ski areas. I do agree that the offerings by larger areas are more attractive particularly with man-made snow that is more reliable than natural conditions.

There used to be good pretty reliable snow in New England for December, now without man-made, NE resorts would suffer terribly. (I have a life time of experience in NE so this is the area I know). The same appears to be true for other areas of the world. The vagaries of the snow, rather than the average amounts, affect the smaller areas without snow making more significantly than areas that can blow a base and survive a lean year. The larger areas can open every year whereas the smaller areas may not be able to open anything in a bad season.
post #114 of 166
Most of the ones that closed after I skied them were closed because of lack of a profit more than lack of snow. You can only keep a place open as a hobby for so long and that's what many of these places were.
post #115 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Most of the ones that closed after I skied them were closed because of lack of a profit more than lack of snow. You can only keep a place open as a hobby for so long and that's what many of these places were.

 

Exactly! I have been personally involved with re-opening one small ski area in central NH that was closed for 12 years (formerly on the NELSAP list), and once it was unbridled from the need to be profitable as a stand-alone business on its own we have been able to reopen, and stay reopened. Now we understand that as a part of a larger HOA that provides a broad array of community services we can remain open for other benefits provided to the community at large - than simply making a bottom-line profit on its own as a ski area.

 

I also worked for two other ski areas on the NELSAP list that remain closed today, one in Southern VT and one in RI that were were both very close to population centers and very popular back in their day. The one in Southern VT was in the shadow of an adjacent larger ski area able to continually offer a broader array of services including extensive snowmaking and slopeside accommodations to skiers. The one in RI was formerly the "biggest vertical" in the state, but which tiny densely populated state couldn't support three ski areas and only one has survived - and not that "biggest vertical" one. These two areas I was quite familiar with (as a former employee) are gone IMO mostly as a function of other nearby areas being able to continually offer more and more services and become more attractive to skiers than they were, as the marketplace consolidated.

 

Remember too that during this time of market consolidation we went through a period where "the big ski corporations" introduced buying power and even some economy of scale to their holdings. Maybe they even learned how to do some things better than their competition as they evolved. IMO snowmaking prowess has been one of the biggest marketplace factors as it allowed more consistent and reliable conditions to those areas that invested in it, and the skiing public eventually demanded more consistent and reliable conditions. 

post #116 of 166

Can you imagine 20,000 people in a week coming to ski this

 

*

 

 

 

Resorts are going to have to provide alternative atractions, sumer and winter. There was a Nice turn out in summer last year for this - 5000 people iirc last year, and I hear that the place was booked out wel in advance for next w/end's wanderlust.

 

 

 

 

My hill (10,000 beds) fills every winter bed for 5-7 nights per event with events  for different demographic groups, and the cost iis sponsored by a car maker, o/seas ski resorts, ski companies and more.

*

 

 

 

Meantime I see Vail is going ahead with the zip line thing

 

Californian resorts rested on their laurels and faded from the minds of the international market. The gfc hit them and Tahoe lost 50,000 Brits. Then a studio and others decided to at least air, internationally, ads with the usual Cal aattractions plus ....snow ... with Errol Kerr at Resort @ Squaw Creek, Rob Lowe at Mammoth, Bahke & Mancuso at Squaw.

 

 

This sums things up nicely:

 

Rob Katz, Chief Executive Officer said, "We have had some very unusual weather so far this season.  For the first time in 30 years, a lack of snow has not allowed us to open the back bowls in Vail as of January 6, 2012 and, for the first time since the late 1800s, it did not snow at all in Tahoe in December.  Despite these conditions, we were very pleased that season to date our total lift ticket revenue was up 0.6% and ski school revenue increased 0.9% compared to the prior year when record snowfall was reported across our resorts.  Our performance in these conditions highlights our strong season pass program, the full experience and comprehensive set of activities and amenities that we provide at our resorts, and the investments we have made across our resorts in constantly improving and broadening the guest experience.  This is most apparent in Tahoe, where our investment in snowmaking has allowed us to open up more terrain than all the other resorts in the area combined.  At this point, with three quarters of the ski season still remaining, we are not revising the earnings guidance we issued in September 2011.  However, we would acknowledge that those targets will be more difficult to achieve given the results over the holidays."

 

There's just too many reasons why resorts close ...and take local economies down the gurgler too.

 

(So where is the hotel waste water treatment plant at Squaw that can oump snowmaking water in winter and fire fighting water in wildfires???)

post #117 of 166

closures are also  due to The CSIRO has discovered the heaviest element yet known to science. The new element is called governmentresortmanagementium (Gv).

It has one neutron, 25 assistant neutrons, 88 deputy neutrons and 198 assistant deputy neutrons, giving it an atomic mass of 312. These 312 particles are held together by forces called morons, which are surrounded by vast quantities of left leaning particles called paeons.

Since Gv has no electrons or protons, it is inert. However, it can be detected, because it impedes every action with which it comes into contact. A tiny amount can cause an action normally taking less than a second to take from four days to four years to complete.

Gv has a normal half-life of 2- 6 years. It does not decay but instead undergoes a reorganisation in which a portion of the assistant neutrons and deputy neutrons exchange places. In fact, Governmentresortmanagementium’s mass will actually increase over time, since each reorganisation will cause more morons to become neutrons, forming isodopes.

This characteristic of moron promotion leads some scientists to believe that Governmentium is formed whenever morons reach a critical concentration. This hypothetical quantity is referred to as critical morass.

When catalyzed with money, Governmentium becomes Administratium, an element that radiates just as much energy as Governmentium since it has half as many paeons but twice as many morons. All of the money is consumed in the exchange, and no other by-products are produced.

post #118 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingCoug View Post

Where was this? When did it close?

 

EDIT: Nevermind, I did myself a google search and found info on it. I had never heard of either this one or Yodelin. Not old enough.

 

Kind of makes you wonder if there is a market for a new north Cascades ski area....I am guessing there probably isn't, but it would be nice to alleviate some of the weekend crowds at Stevens...

Years back in Washington there was talk of a new area called "Early Winters". It was going to be placed in Methow Valley and was going to be a large destination resort. Between locals and government (I am guessing) the idea was shut down. If you visit North Cascade Heli the main lodge was going to be where the heli barn is right now.  Methow Valley is a beautiful place and I can understand why those who live there might not like the resort being in place. Personally I think that with good planning and an ecological friendly goal we know enough to make something like this resort work, although everyone is not going to be happy no matter what.

 

Canada government helps ski areas get going, look at Revelstoke and the new area being proposed up at Jumbo Glacier area, not to mention Whistler/Blackcomb as pretty good success stories. White Pass up in Washington (Steve and Phil Mahre stomping ground) was finally able to put in a new chair three years ago I think, they had that on the plans since 1969, I remember seeing the model at the lodge back then. Way too long to get stuff done.

post #119 of 166

My fond memory and my first area was Eagle Point Park in Clinton, Iowa, which was a bump with a J bar and some lights.  If it snowed, great, if not, you were out of luck!  The lodge was priceless in being a contrast to the "glamour" image of skiing, it was 2 semi trucks, parked in a T with a rental shop at one end, a potbelly stove at the other and tables and chairs.  Refreshments were candy bars and whatever you could make with hot water.  It wasn't much, but it was enough to get my start!  Let's face it, $9 for 4 saturday morning sessions of lifts, lessons and rentals was a pretty good deal in 1970.  Today the lodge is gone but if the snow is good, I try to revisit it once every 5 years and relive my past by hiking for my turns!

post #120 of 166

Ok, let's see if I remember all the areas I've been to that are now closed:

 

Kratka Ridge (Southern California)

Ski Sunrise (sort of closed, sort of not -- now operated for "tubing" 99% of the time by Mt. High in Southern California but very very rarely open for skiing still on the chairlift area -- and they tore out the cool poma lift that went to the bottom of the hill)

Mt. Lassen Ski Area (Northern California)

Iron Mountain (Highway 88 near Kirkwood, CA)

Cottage Springs (Highway 4 near Bear Valley, CA) -- this is where I learned to ski when I was 3 years old

Echo Summit Ski Resort (Highway 50 near Sierra-at-Tahoe)

 

Then, of course, there are the "merged" areas like Tahoe Ski Bowl (now part of Homewood), Slide Mountain (now park of Mt. Rose), etc.

 

And where do I put Mt. Waterman in Southern California?  Technically still "open" but hasn't turned the lifts in at least two years due to a lack of snow and has been closed more than it's been open for the past decade.

 

Places I wish I'd skied but didn't get to before they closed (mostly because I was too young):  Wolverton Ski Area in Sequoia National Park and Mt. Shasta Ski Bowl (not the newer Mt. Shasta Ski Park).  I remember going to the Mt. Shasta Ski Bowl when I was about seven or eight years old and walking through the half demolished day lodge and looking at the bent ski lift towers from one of the avalanches they had there... this would have been in the late 70's.

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