or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post


it is on the honey do list.

Fixed i for you

post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post

I turn mine to 30.

 

DIN 30.jpg

the only binding company to make a 30DIN binding, why? because they have to

as for turning down, springs wear out due to cycling, an indy car runs for 2-5 hours at multiple thousands of RPM and then has its valve springs replaced, your commuter will go for hundreds of thousands of KM with out needing new springs, i think your bindings are fine for the lifetime of the gear

this same argument goes on forever with the gun guys "should i leave mey magazine loaded or unloaded" consensus is loaded is fine based on the car analogy above

post #33 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Fixed i for you

 

Actually it is on MY To Do list. It bothers me more than her. 
post #34 of 57

The reason I take the load off my binding springs is to minimize stress corrosion cracking of the springs and subsequent failure.

High alloy steel under stress is much more susceptible to corrosion cracking from environmental causes than without stress.

A gun magazine is usually kept dry and well lubed and so I keep mine loaded and ready for instant use.

(Never know when 30 rounds of 7.62x39 might come in handy)

A ski binding is contaminated with salt water and not well lubed.

The springs will crack and fail after enough time if kept under stress.

Without stress, not so much!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_corrosion_cracking

post #35 of 57

It's not that I disagree with anything you're saying (frankly don't know enough to disagree), but curious about what you mean by "after enough time." I ask because I've honestly never heard of a spring failing, although it's not a question I bring up over dinner after skiing.

 

Point being, seems to me that while cycles obviously will determine fatigue, and I will buy your argument about loading (assume microfractures), I note that the rate of actual rusting is simply oxygen uptake per unit time. Which is full of of non-linear interactions, but as a rule of thumb, it'll be best related to material (stainless), exposed surface area (low), humidity (variable from fully wet to fully dry), temperate (low), and exposure to other corrosives like salt (low; unless you throw 'em on the roof without a binding cover, unclear why they'd be exposed to much salt).

 

Takeaway: None of these other variables seem very predictive of early failure. Not like marine gear, for instance, where salt water and heat and humidity can screw over a knife blade or valve pronto. So will the loading alone increase the rate of oxygen uptake enough to matter in the average time we own a pair of bindings (well, all of us except Rossi Smash and Phil)?

 

Don't know about you, but most of my bindings have been used for less than 5 years, and given the number of skis I own, some only get used a few days to a week a year. I use the odd wording because I stockpiled "new old" FKS's and Mojo 14's/15's with the diagonal heels, stored under climate controlled conditions. Few here do that, suspect most of us sell our bindings when we sell our skis, so say 2-4 years?

 

Doesn't seem like a significant risk, frankly. th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #36 of 57
^^^
Huh? You've got bindings in with the Chevalier Montrachet or something???
post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

A ski binding is contaminated with salt water.......

 

Where is it you usually ski? We're talking snow skis, right?

post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

 

Where is it you usually ski? We're talking snow skis, right?


There is often a fair amount of salt in the man made snow.  The road salt runs off down the mountain along with the other melt and it all ends up in the collection ponds at the bottom.  It gets blown out the guns when they make snow from that water.  That is one reason that your edges can quickly rust even if you don't put your skis on top of your car.  Seriously, I've seen some rust form on my edges after a couple days when I forget to dry them off after skiing man made snow.

post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 

Takeaway: None of these other variables seem very predictive of early failure. Not like marine gear, for instance, where salt water and heat and humidity can screw over a knife blade or valve pronto. So will the loading alone increase the rate of oxygen uptake enough to matter in the average time we own a pair of bindings (well, all of us except Rossi Smash and Phil)?

 

Don't know about you, but most of my bindings have been used for less than 5 years, and given the number of skis I own, some only get used a few days to a week a year. I use the odd wording because I stockpiled "new old" FKS's and Mojo 14's/15's with the diagonal heels, stored under climate controlled conditions. Few here do that, suspect most of us sell our bindings when we sell our skis, so say 2-4 years?

 

Doesn't seem like a significant risk, frankly. th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

Are you saying that there are people that don't squirrel away multiple pairs of their preferred bindings for future use? eek.gif

 

And what is this "sell" thing you speak of  th_dunno-1[1].gif  confused.gif

 

The hell you say!

 

(btw, I have more than a few examples of fractured springs on high end bindings I have gotten used)

post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

The reason I take the load off my binding springs is to minimize stress corrosion cracking of the springs and subsequent failure.

High alloy steel under stress is much more susceptible to corrosion cracking from environmental causes than without stress.

A gun magazine is usually kept dry and well lubed and so I keep mine loaded and ready for instant use.

(Never know when 30 rounds of 7.62x39 might come in handy)

A ski binding is contaminated with salt water and not well lubed.

The springs will crack and fail after enough time if kept under stress.

Without stress, not so much!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_corrosion_cracking

 

You are more likely to have feedlip issues than spring issues when it comes to magazines. I keep the lip covers on my loaded PMAGs at all times... well, unless they are in my plate carrier.

post #41 of 57

One of these days I'll post a picture of my old ski collection (known to my wife as old junk).

Both springs in some Look Nevada turntables failed under tension from what I call stress corrosion cracking after about 10 years.

Unwinding your bindings is certainly not necessary but is simply part of my lifestyle where I try to do things as smart as I can.

It is a good thing to do on "keeper" old gear.

post #42 of 57

I unmount my bindings in the summer to let out all the built up tension in the core material, then I recalibrate my bindings. 

post #43 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

One of these days I'll post a picture of my old ski collection (known to my wife as old junk).
Both springs in some Look Nevada turntables failed under tension from what I call stress corrosion cracking after about 10 years.
Unwinding your bindings is certainly not necessary but is simply part of my lifestyle where I try to do things as smart as I can.
It is a good thing to do on "keeper" old gear.
most of the older plastic bindings I carefully backed the springs off before I hung them. I got some Geze G90's that were new in box that arrived already pretty cracked. The 80's and early 90's plastic bindings were just bad more so with the 12-14 din models, those springs were under a lot of force.
post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

I unmount my bindings in the summer to let out all the built up tension in the core material, then I recalibrate my bindings. 
do you let the cores "breathe" over the summer or do you plug them?
post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post


do you let the cores "breathe" over the summer or do you plug them?

 

Exactly! I let them breath, then I put them out in the sun for solar rejuvenation. I sprinkle my bindings with seltzer and single malt too. has Trish told you the MI trick about burnishing edges with Vernors? .


Edited by markojp - 6/28/13 at 8:39am
post #46 of 57

I hermetically seal mine and send them up to a storage closet I have reserved on the international space station so they can rest in zero gravity during the off season.

post #47 of 57

Boshield and loose springs....

http://boeshield.com/

post #48 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I hermetically seal mine and send them up to a storage closet I have reserved on the international space station so they can rest in zero gravity during the off season.

 

I've managed to secure an old mine (extremely temperature staple and constant humidity) for storage of the ski's and as this all it is used for the skis can be stored in the best position possible, manufacturer specific of course.

 

crgildart can I send my binding up with yours?

 

;-)

post #49 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

One of these days I'll post a picture of my old ski collection (known to my wife as old junk).
Both springs in some Look Nevada turntables failed under tension from what I call stress corrosion cracking after about 10 years.
Unwinding your bindings is certainly not necessary but is simply part of my lifestyle where I try to do things as smart as I can.
It is a good thing to do on "keeper" old gear.

Funnily enough the ONLY time I have seen a spring actually fail/break was in a set of Look 99RS.

Now I could go through the 25+ pairs in the closet and start turning them all down....... But, as an engineer, I can see no value whatsoever in it.

I guess that means anything I post in gear swap now should have a health warning? rolleyes.gif
post #50 of 57

It's going to be 92 in Seattle today. I'm guessing the garage will see the high 80's as it's well shaded. Hoping my skis don't explode and binding springs unravel. :)

post #51 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

It's going to be 92 in Seattle today. I'm guessing the garage will see the high 80's as it's well shaded. Hoping my skis don't explode and binding springs unravel. :)

I have heard a loud POP in the garage/museum and I did find a spring on the floor from a Salomon 747. 

post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I have heard a loud POP in the garage/museum and I did find a spring on the floor from a Salomon 747. 

I hate it when springs break the sound barrier. mad.gif
post #53 of 57

Had you dialed back the DIN on that 747?

 

Did it sound like this?

 

I never get tired of laughing at that video!

post #54 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Had you dialed back the DIN on that 747?

 

Did it sound like this?

 

I never get tired of laughing at that video!

Since then, I have dialed bindings back. I might have mentioned in this thread that I bought some NIB Geze G90's that were never used and already cracked. I try to keep the bindings displayed with the lease amount of pressure on the springs. 

post #55 of 57

Those 747s were notorious for exploding.  Happened to me twice while skiing low intermediate groomers.  What a POS.

post #56 of 57

most of the "plastic" heel spring housing Salomons from Salomon (747/757/957 etc) would blow the spring out the back of the heel  at some point due to material degradation from use/sunlight/lubricating with Salomon supplied "binding lube" that would melt plastic

one more reason bindings should be made of metal...

post #57 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman View Post

most of the "plastic" heel spring housing Salomons from Salomon (747/757/957 etc) would blow the spring out the back of the heel  at some point due to material degradation from use/sunlight/lubricating with Salomon supplied "binding lube" that would melt plastic

one more reason bindings should be made using the correct polymers/composites...

Fixed that for ya...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed?