or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed?

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 

decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season

(reducing tension to 0)...to do or not needed?

 

i've read that today's skis don't need this, but then read other articles which suggest otherwise.

 

any thoughts from ski shop techs, please?

post #2 of 57
Not needed. Don't worry.
post #3 of 57

snowfight.gif

 

Debatable, but agreed not needed.  Still some folks feel better doing it as long as they remember to crank them back before skiing again.

post #4 of 57

I do it because it's a reminder to go over the entire binding before skiing again next season

post #5 of 57

Go for a bike ride or a sail n' fogett'a'boutit.

post #6 of 57

You've got it all wrong.  You loosen your bindings.  It's your poles you decalibrate.

post #7 of 57

I used to do it.  I don't do it anymore; I have forgotten to reset them too many times.

 

I don't store my skis with tips and tails secured tightly together and a block of wood in between them at the bindings either; should I?

post #8 of 57

Absolutely.

 

What's the down side? It's takes no time at all. I will put them back at the DIN setting required the next time I prep the skis to use. I do this with maybe 25 pairs of skis minimum.

 

If you buy a new pair of skis and bindings every couple years and sell off your current pair it probably will never be a problem for you.

 

If you will still be skiing them in 5 or 10 years why not give those springs and housings a break for the 6-8 months you don't need them

ready to go? If you aren't the type of person that applies a summer "storage" wax on the bases then you  won't turn down the bindings either.

post #9 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

snowfight.gif

 

Debatable, but agreed not needed.  Still some folks feel better doing it as long as they remember to crank them back before skiing again.

 

Don't you do a "pre-flight" the night before on your equipment? th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #10 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

Don't you do a "pre-flight" the night before on your equipment? th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif

I have people for that. biggrin.gif

post #11 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

I have people for that. biggrin.gif

 

I'll need a shot of Ziggy working a screwdriver or a waxing iron....

 

just say'n wink.gif

post #12 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Absolutely.

 

What's the down side?

Cranking the screw and spring up, then down... up, then down.... up, then down...  year after year causes extra wear and tear on the mechanisms and moving parts.  Everything wears out, the more you use it, the faster it wears out.  Cranking it up and down is extra use that is unnecessary and might also lead to failure sooner.

post #13 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Cranking the screw and spring up, then down... up, then down.... up, then down...  year after year causes extra wear and tear on the mechanisms and moving parts.  Everything wears out, the more you use it, the faster it wears out.  Cranking it up and down is extra use that is unnecessary and might also lead to failure sooner.

 

Not if everything is lubricated as it should be. And if it's not you've got other problems like inconsistent releases, etc.

 

So in a word, wrong.

post #14 of 57

Skis wear out faster than bindings and used skis sell better with the bindings included. So if you are getting newer, better, shinier skis on a regular basis, then don't worry about binding springs wearing out.

 

However, if you are an old ski aficionado and keep (and ski) your skis forever, then act accordingly.

post #15 of 57
Just as a slight work of caution, if you are going to back off the pressure for that extra bit of peace of mind, I would suggest marking the individual toes and heels to what the din was set at. While you might be a "7", the binding might be a 6 or an 8 to torque like a 7.
post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

Not if everything is lubricated as it should be. And if it's not you've got other problems like inconsistent releases, etc.

 

So in a word, wrong.


Spit happens, the more you mess with things the more likely something bad can happen.  This is precisely why I use those valves on my oil pans instead of taking out the factory drain plug when changing the oil every six months.  Do you think your car will last longer if you shut it off and turn it back on every second that you aren't driving it, or is easier on everything to just leave it running when stopped for a few minutes?

post #17 of 57

crgildart, I'll throw you this bone.......most people should NEVER mess with their bindings.

 

There are, however, people who are knowledgeable about this who advocate removing some spring tension while the seasons/temps change. 

For me, I leave them alone and make sure they're in good working order before I use them again

 

That being said, if you aren't knowledgeable about such things, then you probably shouldn't mess with it. 


Edited by Trekchick - 6/23/13 at 8:47am
post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

Not if everything is lubricated as it should be. And if it's not you've got other problems like inconsistent releases, etc.

 

So in a word, wrong.


Spit happens, the more you mess with things the more likely something bad can happen.  This is precisely why I use those valves on my oil pans instead of taking out the factory drain plug when changing the oil every six months.  Do you think your car will last longer if you shut it off and turn it back on every second that you aren't driving it, or is easier on everything to just leave it running when stopped for a few minutes?

 

Those springs will need to be replaced from corrosion long before leaving them at a reasonable DIN will wear them out.

hijack.gif
You oil pan has valves? 

post #19 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

 

Those springs will need to be replaced from corrosion long before leaving them at a reasonable DIN will wear them out.

hijack.gif
You oil pan has valves? 

Yes, I've used these on all my vehicles for several years now..

 

post #20 of 57
Thread Starter 

to those offering legit replies thanks

....to all others well, you know, i'll leave it to my auto

mechanic to take care of them with the next tune up

post #21 of 57

There is nothing very complicated about how bindings work (http://www.epicski.com/t/119829/help-dynastar-omeglass-px-bindings-installation/30). Creating and retaining constant and consistent pressure while all parts being stationary is the name of the game here. As such, wear and tear in bindings will most likely come from creating and retaining pressure rather than infrequent movement of parts by nature.

 

The source of pressure, of course, is the spring, and the receiver is various internal/external parts such as spring casing, washers, binding shell, hinges, connecting rods, bolts, etc. I think it's a plausible statement that the useful life of "receiver" parts can be maximized by minimizing the amount of time for which they are exposed to pressure. On the other hand, the behavior of springs seems to be the hotly debated subject here. Do springs retain their resilience/torque better and longer with (1) consistent load at all times, (2) minimum exposure to load (i.e., crank down DIN off-season), or (3) constant fluctuation in load?

 

I think (3) can be safely ruled out here. The evidence is the bindings on rental skis.  DIN readings on rental ski bindings are usually higher than their true DIN, due to metal fatigue caused by repeated DIN adjustments for customers... Unfortunately at this time, I don't have an answer on weather (1) or (2) is true, but there's got to be some study done on this available on the web.

 

With all that said, I store mine with minimum DIN load possible, and it's a personal choice. Unless I find some empirical evidence otherwise, my own speculation is that (a) springs will get weaker over time with constant load, and (b) very infrequent once or twice a year off-seasonal adjustments cause little to no fatigue to the metal molecular structure.


Edited by nochaser - 6/23/13 at 3:13pm
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Do you think your car will last longer if you shut it off and turn it back on every second that you aren't driving it, or is easier on everything to just leave it running when stopped for a few minutes?

 

I think shutting off the engine instead of leaving it on idle when I'm not using the car over night or out of town will definitely help the engine last longer. :)

post #23 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


Do you think your car will last longer if you shut it off and turn it back on every second that you aren't driving it, or is easier on everything to just leave it running when stopped for a few minutes?

OTOH, do you think your clutch on a manual lasts longer if you take it out of gear at every light? wink.gif

 

Seem to recall that MO, who seems to both know about this stuff and have the credentials to back it up, argues we should all have bindings with a DIN range that allows us to have it set near the bottom. Eg, if we ski with an 8, run a DIN 16 binding. In which case, no one needs to worry about relaxing the DIN because it's already there.

 

This is a key part of the Epic Economic Stimulus (EES), that will single handedly rescue the skiing industry from ruin by pumping demand for otherwise low volume gear.  biggrin.gif

post #24 of 57

I've changed my opinion.   I will now crank down my DIN every time I remove my skis, especially during the mid day lunch break.  That should ensure optimal life expectancy.  biggrin.gif

post #25 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I've changed my opinion.   I will now crank down my DIN every time I remove my skis, especially during the mid day lunch break.  That should ensure optimal life expectancy.  biggrin.gif

This is key, because the springs need time to rest before confronting the added 15 lbs. eek.gif

post #26 of 57

I am taking it a step further in that I will take the bindings off the skis and air them out, this way I can also properly rotate the screws so the ones on the inside edge don't get over stressed compared to the outer edge ones.

 

 

post #27 of 57

Phil, don't forget to rotate top for bottom each week.  Wouldn't want the grease to migrate.

post #28 of 57

I turn mine to 30.

 

DIN 30.jpg

post #29 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I am taking it a step further in that I will take the bindings off the skis and air them out, this way I can also properly rotate the screws so the ones on the inside edge don't get over stressed compared to the outer edge ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That is quite the ski...er binding wall, but shouldn't you have painted the drywall first before hanging up the wall decor?

post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post









That is quite the ski...er binding wall, but shouldn't you have painted the drywall first before hanging up the wall decor?
it is on the to do list.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › decalibrating bindings with screwdriver during off season...to do or not needed?