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Oxidation

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have not always been diligent about keeping a protective coat of wax on the race skis during parts of the summer months. And oxidation is said to slow the skis down. To Remedy: Do I need to do a base grind or is it possible to brush the oxidation out?
post #2 of 12

depends on how bad it is

post #3 of 12
What many people assume is oxidation is in many cases just wax. Run your finger nail across it lightly. If it leaves a mark, it's just wax. Brush your bases with a brass brush, they'll be fine. I've stopped putting storage wax on, as the place they are stored is dry and even the edges don't rust. I just do a bunch of hot scrapes at the beginning of the season. Frankly, I think if you're waxing regularly all season and don't hit a lot of man-made snow you have nothing to worry about. I always put a harder wax along the edges and almost never have this base burn problem.
post #4 of 12

Much has been discussed about this over the years and there is a school of thought that ptex can't even oxidize, that it's a myth basically.  I don't know the answer, but if I were you I'd start waxing the skis multiple times, or hotbox some wax into them.  A stone grind will slow them down and require multiple waxings in any case.

post #5 of 12

    Hairs can be removed with a combination of steel brushes, 3m fiber pads (green or red), and sharp metal scrapers...plenty of hot scraping in between cycles of these--don't forget to use fiberlene to keep the bases clean of crud before hot scraping. Once satisfied (a few to several cycles, depending on how extensive the oxidation is), start your waxing all over with a base conditioner first. IF you have uneven bases as a result of excessive wear (seen with the aid of a true bar), you'll need to have 'em flattened.

 

    Storage wax is always a good idea. 

 

   P.s. Go easy on the metal scraper and steel brushes pressure-wise. Light pressure should be all you need...

 

 

    zenny

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Much has been discussed about this over the years and there is a school of thought that ptex can't even oxidize, that it's a myth basically.  I don't know the answer, but if I were you I'd start waxing the skis multiple times, or hotbox some wax into them.  A stone grind will slow them down and require multiple waxings in any case.

This is what I believe, a majority of the plastics in your house is made of polyethylene (aka ptex), when's the last time you saw any of them oxidize even after sitting for years?
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

This is what I believe, a majority of the plastics in your house is made of polyethylene (aka ptex), when's the last time you saw any of them oxidize even after sitting for years?

Hey! Who gave you permission to bring common sense to this party? I need this myth in place. I use it to get out of going shoe shopping with the wife - "Sorry honey. My skis are starting to oxidize and if I don't take care of them, I'll have to get a grind and that shortens their life. Before you know it, new skis. I need to make these last."

She doesn't believe me of course (I suck at lying) and just rolls her eyes.
post #8 of 12

    Yeah, I guess I was picturing a scenario where the bases were white and hairy due to insufficient waxing...but I didn't read the op's question closely enough--I keyed in on the part where he said "  And oxidation is said to slow the skis down."  Hairs are slow, and some people think of base burn as oxidation. 

 

  Regardless, storage wax protects the bases from dirt/grime that can accumulate on them if when the skis are stored for a long period of time--especially a relatively dirty place like a garage, for instance. 

 

   zenny

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for the input. I wax virtually everyday during the season. I just have not always been good about putting on that final coat going into the off season. I had always believed that something mythical might be going on here.
post #10 of 12

I purchased sight unseen, a "lightly used" demo ski from the Kastle rep that had some serious edge burrs on a low mileage MX 83, so I wanted it sharpened (side and base edges) but not stone ground. The ski tech said he would feather the base so there was a smooth transition from ptex base material to metal base edge.

 

That is exactly what he did and you could still see the minor scrapes in the base that were too shallow to bother filling with p-tex. So the ski was sharpened but not stone ground.

 

The OP may want to get something similar done to his skis if all he needs is edge rust removal.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by wta55 View Post

Thanks so much for the input. I wax virtually everyday during the season. I just have not always been good about putting on that final coat going into the off season. I had always believed that something mythical might be going on here.

 

WTA - another excuse blown!  biggrin.gif  Good to see you thinking about it again - how is the leg rehab going?

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hello RT

My most unfavorite question. The leg is an ordeal with seemingly endless complications with the outcome being pain incessantly as my companion. I hope you are well!
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