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Switching to skiing, what should my first pair be? - Page 2

post #31 of 42

I will second or third the suggestion for the Rossi S3. I have skied it for 3 years on groomed and in powder, it is one of 4 skis in my quiver. If tuned to 3 degrees side bevel, and the edges are maintained, it will hold very well on hard snow. (you will also have to learn to tip them over into a carve)  If I could have only 1 ski, the S3 would be it and I would be very happy. And, as they are being replaced this year, new and used ones will be priced reasonably. They are easy to ski and way too much fun. However, if you win a lottery, get a pair of Soul 7's. Even better. They will be replacing my S3's this year. Can't wait to get back on a pair.

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Why? Do you have a pair for sale?  

IIRC you have a rather large quiver and were trying to get rid of some overlap. 

Why? are you looking? I have a pair of 183 blends (really like 180-181) id consider selling for cheap. They have some edge chips on the topsheet, and some base scratches, but no major coreshots. They have some good life left in them, I only used them about 35 days. Theyre too short for me and i need the sth14s that are mounted on them for my new skis. 

post #33 of 42
Thread Starter 

Hey all, I'm starting to look at skis again as evo has some really nice-looking demos for sale right now. What do folks think about these options?

 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/blizzard-magnum-81-iq-max-skis-12-demo-bindings-used.aspx

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/dynastar-legend-85-skis-marker-speedpoint-90-demo-bindings-used.aspx

 

The Magnum's seem more groomer-focused, so I'm kinda of leaning towards them so I'll have those to go back to when there's no fresh snow; the legend's seem like a kind of in-betweener that I've been warned against. But the 87 waist should still make the Magnums usable off-piste, right? Also, on the length, I heard shorter groomer skis were ok, so for a 6'1", 175lb beginner, would 172cm be OK, if a bit on the short side? And lastly, any thoughts on the bindings? I've kind of been ignoring those, as I feel like for my first pair of skis I won't have any preferences on bindings so I would assume some standard demo bindings would work fine, right?

post #34 of 42

I would suggest a good all mountain ski, but don't go too fat, you want to have some performance when there is no powder, and when you venture into the moguls.  With your prior snow boarding experience and your size, I would say go with approx. a 185cm length; a little shorter if you go really fat, and maybe a little longer if you go skinny (carving ski).  Also, the boots are more important than the skis, if you are not comfortable and warm, you will not have fun.  Since you are used to snow boarding boots, I would suggest going with a Full Tilt boot.  They are high performance, warm, and quite economical compared to many other boots. 

 

And, a hint about skiing.  Watch some of the old late 1970s and 1980s ski videos/films, and pay attention to how they skied the long skinny boards, especially the mogul and slalom skiers.  Skiing a pair of modern shaped skis using this technique is amazing, much better than letting the ski do all the work. 

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhernon View Post

And, a hint about skiing.  Watch some of the old late 1970s and 1980s ski videos/films, and pay attention to how they skied the long skinny boards, especially the mogul and slalom skiers.  Skiing a pair of modern shaped skis using this technique is amazing, much better than letting the ski do all the work. 

 

You're seriously advising him to watch people on totally different equipment over those on the same / similar equipment?  Sweet, next I'm going to check out some BMX videos to brush up on my downhill mtb technique.

post #36 of 42

It should be a great pair of boots. Make sure you can flex forward with your shins so that without leaning forward from your hips, you cannot see your toes while flexing your shins forward. They should not be loose, nice and firm around the whole foot and lower leg without buckling them up real tight.

post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I think skiing tech has progressed a lot since then, and technique has adjusted accordingly. I'm sure there's a tendency to get lazy because skis are more forgiving now, but I dunno about copying 40 year old technique...

 

 

Quote:
With your prior snow boarding experience and your size, I would say go with approx. a 185cm length; a little shorter if you go really fat, and maybe a little longer if you go skinny (carving ski).

 

Also, I've actually heard the opposite, that it's better to go longer with powder skis because they don't have as much snow contact anyway and the extra length helps with flotation, but more groomer-focused skis, shorter would be OK, especially for learning. Any thoughts on that?

 

And any thoughts on those Blizzards? They're still available, but only one left in stock. I'm mainly worried that they're too short, which if Jhernon is recommending a 185, that would seem to be the case. Any other opinions?

post #38 of 42

Hi,

 

I can only speak from a very limited experience, as last season was my first season skiing (at age 44), however... ;-)

 

I have a pair of Fischer X-pressions with Diamar bindings and Blackdiamond Prime boots.

Last season I got in about 18 days on piste and 2 days off piste (in the Allgäu ). 

 

I found these to be pretty pretty good for both (though skinnier than you are looking at -75´s).

They felt good on piste and not bad (I was bad, the skis not) in deep, wet snow. They seem like pretty good "middle of the road" skis for both on and off piste. (though I am considering something wider for freeriding for next season).

I never felt like the boots were too soft on piste. They seemed (to me at least) to be on the stiff end of the AT boots.

 

For me, off piste was very different, but you may find it easier having been on the snowboard more.

I was feeling very comfortable on red (and most black) piste in Germany and Austria, but in the deep snow it was totally different. Wider skis might have been better, but there were 2 guys with me on skinnier, and much older, skis and having no trouble (though they had a lot of back country experience).

 

scoTt

post #39 of 42

Again...boots...boots...BOOTS!

 

Good, now that's out of the way, let's think about lessons.

 

You are the poster child for private lessons.

 

Here's why. As a boarder, you already understand the principles of sliding on snow. You understand how snow behaves, how a ski or board turns and the other basics that someone that's never been on the snow doesn't. Good start. A group lesson is going to put you together with people that are either ahead of you on the learning curve (experienced skiers looking to get better) or behind you (never been on snow before). A private lesson instructor is going to give you an assessment of your existing skills, ask you what your goals are and figure out what you need, instruction wise, to get from here to there.

 

As for a ski, find something used (but not used up) and/or super cheap to be your day to day ski until you have a better handle on what you want, performance wise, from a ski. Until you're actually skiing, you'll be relying on other peoples' conceptions of what ought to be important to you. It's kind of like picking a car before you've finished driver's ed...that lifted truck looked cool, but can you park it and do you even want to park it?

post #40 of 42

I think you may want to look into the Line Prophet 90, the Blizzard Bushwacker and the Salomon Rocker 2 90's for that mid level ability intermediate advanced ski - all 3 like 88 underfoot, leaning towards on piste skiing more than off.

 

Maybe you want to look into the middle of the line all mountain skis from Salomon, Volkl and Atomic etc...Enduro or RTM in a 76 to 80 underfoot, perhaps the E83 by Rossignol.

 

If you happen to consider the Rossignol Experience 88 skis, I have a pair for sale that I only used 2 or 3 days tops. See gear sale forum for specifics and pictures.

post #41 of 42

I switched from old long long from the early 1980s to modern shaped skis just two years ago.  Been there, done that; and, it works.  Although not intended, your comparison actually does make some sense, cross training has some great benefits. 

post #42 of 42

Lot of advice, very little of it good.
 

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