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Who taught you how to ski? - Page 2

Poll Results: Who taught you to ski?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 26% of voters (25)
    Dad
  • 12% of voters (12)
    Mom
  • 4% of voters (4)
    Significant Other
  • 43% of voters (41)
    Ski Instructor
  • 8% of voters (8)
    Friends
  • 5% of voters (5)
    Strangers
  • 36% of voters (34)
    I taught my own bad self
  • 10% of voters (10)
    Other (because this poll is missing something)
94 Total Votes  
post #31 of 56

 I got a six day package of 6x4hr lessons, lift pass and equipment hire, it had a guarantee that if you either hated skiing after 3 days or hadn't mastered the basics enough to ski a blue run by the last day that you would get your money back. Never looked back and have taken several other novice skiers on similar deals over the last 12 years or so.

post #32 of 56

My Dad started teaching me in Austria while I was still in diapers (in Austria you can walk you get skis as a child).  After moving to Canada (when I was 3-1/2) he continued and set a solid foundation that served to the point that I was already racing in high school (got a few lessons after that from some very good instructors, more by chance than anything).

 

Fortunately or maybe to some unfortunately the original foundation still shows through, but it still puts in the really good overall group.

 

The most important thing to keep my progression going is I watch skiers as I'm going up the lift and look for the errors that are made (and try to understand them) and not make those same mistakes.  Every skier I watch from beginner to all out professional has something to teach you.  If you can see and understand a mistake, you are more than half way to not making the same one.

 

I have shared this experience by teaching several others to ski who are well on their way to become advanced skiers with the same lessons my dad taught me.  Last season I taught school kids at the local hill (pimple actually), its amazing how much your skill set improves and refines when you teach if you let.

post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post

Edge wise hockey and skiing are the exact same thing, skates are just a bit lighter though. wink.gif

Yeah, they're great on the hardpack, but they suck in powder.

 

My Mom and Dad (mostly my Dad) got me started skiing at @ 3 - 4 years old and gave me the basics.  Around 10 - 12 years old, a family friend who was a ski instructor gave us lessons and really moved me along in my progression as a skier.  After that it's been mostly working on my own, with an occasional lesson.

post #34 of 56

I am still learning, but an old friend took me skiing for the first time, at the age of 37. I almost quit after a couple of hours but by the end of the day I knew I would ski again. I would say most of the above, my parents don't ski and my wife started to ski so she could see me in the winter, have taught me. I have really become a better skier since I started teaching others to ski.

post #35 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by killerseahorse View Post

Dad!! Started at a very young age, Dad would ski down the hill standing me up on the front of his skis. Started skiing at 3 or 4 years old in my little pink ski suit. Loved it ever since!

Sidetrack - You need to post in this thread. nicknames/handles..what they mean

I mean, your username is interesting to say the least. 

post #36 of 56

I was a lifelong hockey player and strapped on my first pair of skis at 30. My buddies took me out to Attitash and by the afternoon I was tooling around good enough to ski blues. Next season I joined a ski house at Killington with a bunch of hard core skiers and ex racers and just followed them around the hill and did some clinics and got going reasonably well by season 3. I signed up for some masters race clinics that really helped at the start of season 4 & 5& I Just pounded the mileage, season after season. I put  both of my kids on skis at 21/2 and they are involved in junior programs every winter. I wish I had formal training from a young age, but really believe that my skating background helped quite a bit.

post #37 of 56

My first season I was in a country where there were ski instructors behind every tree.  There were no trees.

 

Every so often the masses on the slope would stop and fall to their knees facing Mecca

 

I left the country knowing how to turn left/right and stop.  Never used a chair lift.

 

Back in the USA - friends for a while.  We were all bad.  To poor to afford ski schools.

 

Finely had the money to afford ski school.  Taking lessons from instructors ever since.  Still learning after 40+ years.

 

Spent years chasing the snow.  OK my employment kept me in Europe for five years.  Still a 5+ hour drive to ski resorts.  Hired 'Guides' when visiting new resorts.

 

Now need the 'Senior Discount' to afford ski school.  1/2 of my 100+ days last winter were with a Senior Group lead by instructor.

 

Most people have put a plumbers kid to college.  I've paid for a bunch of little ski bums.

post #38 of 56

Freddy Bissig taught my mom and I in 1961.  I was three at the time,  so she probably should get equal credit.

post #39 of 56

When I was five they would put me on skis at the base and let me waddle around unsupervised.  At six they put on a little slope with a ropetow, gave me $1.00 for lunch and again, left me while they went skiing.  Once I could sort of keep up, I could go with them for a run or two on the big hill..

 

I still remember those times---no teachers, parents, just out on the snow having fun.  My first lesson would be from my first race coach.

 

Times have changed, ski areas have changed, but there sure are some coddled kids out there these days.

post #40 of 56

Now I ski at the base and waddle around unsupervised.  Somethings never change.duck.gif

post #41 of 56
Skiing started in the backyard for me. My dad would put us in the back of the pickup truck and drive us to the top of the hill, let us go, and then meet us at the bottom to do it all over again. I was probably 3 at the time and I had a purple outfit with a patch that said "don't eat yellow snow."

When living in NY, we would spend a week at Killington. Half the day was with lessons/day care and the other half with the parents. Mom skied but never really got into it. Dad loved it and liked having a family activity. Eventually he got transferred to VT.
I
We moved to VT when I was 8 or 9. I year I was in a racing program at Bolton Valley and then switched over to freestyle. Dad was busy on ski patrol. I had some incredible coaches for a couple years (Hilary Engisch, Jack Flemming, and Diana Williams.) However, I always felt like I learned the most when trying to keep up with Chuck Martin at Killington. I competed the last 3 years without a coach, but my best friend and I skied together and she critiqued me.

I'm hoping to do Eldora's Women's program next year to ease into things and make some new ski buddies.
post #42 of 56

It surprises me how many folks "find" skiing later in life.  I guess I was lucky growing up in a ski town.

post #43 of 56

My vote "taught my own bad self.." refers more to the time wasted between lessons in the off & on initial years(@30yo..~84').  Any magazine articles that sounded interesting(lol) plus "Alpine Ski School" filmed @Killington.  Think a few videos with Plake, Schmitt and others tied many things together too...but did log on to Epic in later end of 90s = very helpful.  Experiencing the sensations watching others ascending via lifts helped a lot and tied in with Epic threads...  So was factually more of a smorgasborg(sp?)...


Edited by HaveSkisWillClimb - 6/20/13 at 11:33am
post #44 of 56

Much of it self instrucion, reading and mimicing.

 

But really if I think about it every person I have ever skied with.  Not sure I have ever taken a "lesson" until last winter.  That one I paid  for.   But been at it since grade school in the '60s.  Had pleanty of lessons served up at no charge though.  Some easier to compehend than others.

post #45 of 56

I had to mark "other" because my learning was sort of a mess.  I didn't start skiing until my freshman year in college, 1962, in Missoula, MT, cuz I was too "cool" for that.  The next year I lied my way into the varsity ski program and skied several days a week.  Unfortunately the coach was not much of a skier so I didn't really learn anything from him.  I didn't ski for several years after hitting a tree and doing some serious damage to my right knee.  I didn't ski more than a few days a season until about 7 years ago when I started volunteering with Eagle Mount, an adaptive ski program at Red Lodge Mountain.  There were two PSIA level 2 instructors, a husband and wife, involved with the program and they offered free clinics to the volunteers and I rapidly became their best customer.  I skied with them every chance I got and he was merciless.  I had just about every bad habit know to ski instructors and essentially undertook to re-learn to ski from scratch.  Near the end of the 2010 season, after a session during which I thought I did quite well, I was informed that my skiing was "contrived."  At that moment it occurred to me that not once during all the hours I had spent skiing with him had he every said I did anything right.  There had been no praise at all, only criticism.  I was skiing better than I had ever skied, but I was not really enjoying it.  After that comment, I just walked away.  I had already passed my PSIA level 1 test and was teaching occasionally and taught about 40 days the 2010-1 season.  That season really changed my skiing for the better because I was skiing a lot with the other instructors who would offer hints combined with praise and we had some instructor clinics which I attended as often as possible.  I'm now skiing better than I ever have, can ski the entire mountain at Red Lodge, but more importantly I'm really having a lot of fun doing it.

post #46 of 56

When I moved to Utah for school a classmate convinced me to learn how to ski, told me he would help me out with gear and even teach me! I spent 1200+ dollars and was ready to go and he kind of disappeared. I ended up watching the South Park Episode Asspen and learned Pizza and french fry, next day I headed up to Snowbird to give it a shot. It has ended up working out pretty well for me.

post #47 of 56
I'm pretty much self taught on everything with little help here and three along the way. Where there is a will, there is a way. Truly.
post #48 of 56

 

 

 

my baby's just got a part time job at an indoor ski centre ...

post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBiggestHuck View Post

When I moved to Utah for school a classmate convinced me to learn how to ski, told me he would help me out with gear and even teach me! I spent 1200+ dollars and was ready to go and he kind of disappeared. I ended up watching the South Park Episode Asspen and learned Pizza and french fry, next day I headed up to Snowbird to give it a shot. It has ended up working out pretty well for me.

 

So you learned to ski from that South Park episode? You serious? LOL

post #50 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBiggestHuck View Post

When I moved to Utah for school a classmate convinced me to learn how to ski, told me he would help me out with gear and even teach me! I spent 1200+ dollars and was ready to go and he kind of disappeared. I ended up watching the South Park Episode Asspen and learned Pizza and french fry, next day I headed up to Snowbird to give it a shot. It has ended up working out pretty well for me.

Kids these days....rolleyes.gif

Don't you know, you're supposed to learn from Goofy!

 

*there is a longer version that shows how to put your gear on.  I'll see if I can find it. 

post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Kids these days....rolleyes.gif

Don't you know, you're supposed to learn from Goofy!

 

*there is a longer version that shows how to put your gear on.  I'll see if I can find it. 


nonono2.gifRules.gif

 

No helmet???  Really???

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

nonono2.gifRules.gif

 

No helmet???  Really???

Didn't you see Roger Rabbit?  Toons don't need no stinkin' helmets.

post #53 of 56

Shortly after becoming a teenager in the early 1970's i went with my parents to a weekend thing their group was doing in the Catskills. The resort had a small ski hill with a T or J bar and the most dated equipment i ever rented. A stranger was there tooling around with his grade school age son prior to heading to hunter for the day. He saw me trying and first taught me to do a hockey style skis together swing sideways stop. He then taught me to link the parallel stops to form turns and how it all worked better with more speed. Completely  skipped snow plow and stem christies.

After that my older sister who had a beginner lesson or two at Camelback, bought me along and taught me to snow plow down the Mark Anthony, lol, didn't take long for me to leave her on Cleopatra and head for Marjory's Delight.

I read allot of the tips in Ski and Skiing magazine, had a subscription to whichever one my school and local library didn't have. Also became a Junior member of the Wissahickon Ski Club which facilitated skiing two to three times/week, wasn't bad coming from the Philly burbs.

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

 

So you learned to ski from that South Park episode? You serious? LOL


Ya pretty much! I have to admit I have probably done more reading/research than skiing the past few years but I feel pretty confident in my skiing even though I have never learned from an instructor. I talked to a few people about doing informal lessons but they all said I was doing pretty well on my own. Epickski.com has helped out a lot over the past two years!

post #55 of 56

Yeah, basically OBS for me.  First time on skis in my 30's, no lessons, and kept falling as soon as I got off the lift. Swore never again to try skiing. Fast forward 10 yrs.

Then decided to get the kids into it about 6 yrs ago for something new to do in the winter months.  Took some beginner lessons at Bromley and Mount Snow.  Just couldn't get the hang of it - if I had to do ANYTHING other than straight lining (slow) or pizza stops.   Couldn't turn to save my life.  Instruction was no help, with tips on which ski to steer with, etc. - I just couldn't "steer" a ski at slow speed as I imagined I was supposed to.

 

Then, on a lift, disgusted with my progress and dreading the next run down the Bromley bunny hill, I admired someone carve nice fast turns down Upper East Meadow, and I decided to just try and copy what I saw.  A BIG plus was just letting my speed increase.  That was huge - like trying to ride a bike SLOW - it had been difficult.  The balance and momentum advantage gained from the increase in speed allowed me to turn with weight shifts and then pressure changes to the edges - and it clicked! 

From there its been a compilation of tips I've gotten here, read in Ski (Rogan), seen on YouTube, and trying them and sticking with what works for me.  Getting in about 20 days a season helps too.

 

I also have developed a "mantra" of reminders that work for me which I constantly hear in my head - imagine Robert Stack at the base lodge barking corrections during the run .....

 

 

Hands up! ...  Power position!...  Angulate! ... Drive the skis! (as opposed to riding them) ...Hands forward! ... Pressure the new downhill big toe!  ... Weight forward! ...

 

and I smile now as I cruise down the blue and black groomers at Bromley and Okemo.

post #56 of 56

I assume I started with lessons. I don't recall. We were living in Minnesota and I was put on ski club bus in second grade. My only memories from that time period are skiing by myself. After that initial season, we moved to Florida for three years. I remember thinking about skiing a lot. After that, we moved to the California Bay Area and I rejoined a ski club that year. Lessons were part of deal. We often skipped them, except when the lift lines were long.

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