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East Coast All-Mountain Powder Ski

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

About me:

 

Physical: 

5'11'' 

175lbs.

 

Ski style:

Intermediate-Expert skier: (enjoys going super fast on groomers, likes occasional jumps, trees, occasional park. Rarely rides switch but enjoys it occasionally to show off to friends)

Skiing mostly NH and Southern VT

 

Current Equipment:

Full Tilt boots (Hot Doggers) -- freestyle medium flexing boots

2011 Line Prophet 90 (179cm)

2008 Fischer Addicts (180cm full symmetrical 84 underfoot park skis)

 

Dilemma:

 

I'm looking for an all-mountain powder ski that can handle the occasional resort powder conditions in the east coast. So far, I've researched (but not demoed) the following:

 

2013 Line Mr. Pollard's Opus

2013 Armada Norwalk

 

For any east coast skiers, I'd love to know what your thoughts are on these skis and/or if you have other recommendations. I'd like to stay above the 100mm waist because I already have skis at 90 underfoot and would only want to ride the new pow skis on days when it really shines to have fatty skis. The following skis are ones I've considered but scratched from the list:

 

2013 Armada TST -- didn't think the 101 underfoot was wide enough 

2013 Line Sir Francis Bacon -- same reason as the above

2013 Armada JJ -- don't think the dramatic tip and tail rocker are necessary for east coast and heard that it chatters a lot at high speeds and wash out during carving.

 

Conversely, do you guys think I even need wider skis since I'm already riding on Line Prophet 90? I love these skis by the way. 

post #2 of 27

How about the new 2014 Rossignol Soul 7 (106 mm uderfoot)? Haven't ski them, but hear and read great things about them: http://www.epicski.com/t/120313/2014-rossignol-soul-7-the-spork-of-skis

post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip @Cheizz! Unfortunately Rossi Soul 7 is way out of my price range. My budget is under $450 and under $400 preferred. But the guy who wrote the review for Soul 7 is amazing. What a well written review! 

post #4 of 27

In the leftover category. I would suggest..

 

Nordica Patron

Blizzard Gunsmoke

Salomon Rocker2 115

 

Three skis that are in the low 110's that will be fun eastern skis powder skis that will be playful in the trees yet fun on the way back in. I do have a pair of Gunsmokes 185's mounted with Look Pivot 15's (the metal ones) that I am selling. PM me for price and details. 

post #5 of 27

Hi - I ski where you do, will assume you are talking about a powder ski to supplement your existing Prophet 90. Yes? 


Anyway, ploughing ahead. The Norwalk might work well, a JJ front and more conventional, and stiffer rear. Will prolly be best in trees, bumps,  variable groomers. Not sure about speed, though; seems more of a finesse ski. Trust, again, that you are not seeing a 116 mm as perfect for zooming blue runs in the east. Or let me know where you'll be, and I'll be elsewhere. And it has a very conventional tail, so just OK for switch. 

 

Phil's idea of the Gunsmoke is solid, I've seen some of them around, along with a slew of Helldorados. Saw a very good skier (instructor) in Canada on Rocker 2 115's, looked like he was loving the stashes and trees, but firm trails, well, let's say he was reduced to a very unique style, sorta sliding sideways back and forth. Everyone seems to love Patrons, but doubt you'll find them cheap. OTOH, the Unleashed Hell is basically a slightly lighter Patron, very solid do-all soft snow ski, lively, can be had very cheap these days online.  

 

You might look for some Line Influences, the 105 would work well back here as a soft snow all-around, the 115 as a powder ski, and they should have decent prices since Line always overproduces..

 

Finally, check out Praxis, see if they're still having their sale. Some of their skis, like the MVP, might be perfect. 

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi @beyond. Thanks for your suggestions. As I've mentioned in my post, I'm looking for powder skis that can handle the occasional powder days we have in New England. As you know, whenever we get a powder day, it's usually fresh soft pow in the morning through lunch time then afterwards it's all whales and bumps. Very rarely we get days when it just snows all day and the whole weekend. I already have a pair of Line Prophet 90s I can use for all-mountain purposes as an everyday ski. I'm just looking for a fatty ski that can handle these occasional deep pow days that can go through pow, crud, bumps, and be stable enough to charge through the groomers on the way back to the lift. 

 

That being said, I've started to shy away from rocker/camber/rocker type skis such as Armada JJs and Blizzard Gunsmoke simply because I feel that the rockered tip won't let me carve and charge hard as I'd like. They might be great in deep powder but like I said, we rarely get truly deep pow days in New England. But maybe I'm wrong. After all, I've never demoed these skis so I've no idea--I'm simply going by what people have said. 

 

I'm looking forward to checking out the Line's new lineup -- Sick Days. Seems like it has all the features I'm looking for currently but the price seems out of my budget. 

post #7 of 27

Paging DoWork and Josh to the white courtesy phone...

post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by douismaximus View Post

Hi @beyond. Thanks for your suggestions. As I've mentioned in my post, I'm looking for powder skis that can handle the occasional powder days we have in New England. As you know, whenever we get a powder day, it's usually fresh soft pow in the morning through lunch time then afterwards it's all whales and bumps. Very rarely we get days when it just snows all day and the whole weekend. I already have a pair of Line Prophet 90s I can use for all-mountain purposes as an everyday ski. I'm just looking for a fatty ski that can handle these occasional deep pow days that can go through pow, crud, bumps, and be stable enough to charge through the groomers on the way back to the lift. 

 

That being said, I've started to shy away from rocker/camber/rocker type skis such as Armada JJs and Blizzard Gunsmoke simply because I feel that the rockered tip won't let me carve and charge hard as I'd like. They might be great in deep powder but like I said, we rarely get truly deep pow days in New England. But maybe I'm wrong. After all, I've never demoed these skis so I've no idea--I'm simply going by what people have said. 

 

I'm looking forward to checking out the Line's new lineup -- Sick Days. Seems like it has all the features I'm looking for currently but the price seems out of my budget. 

Demoing would help. IME, a moderately rockered tip on any ski over 100 mm makes the whole experience nicer, whether crud or deep pow. A moderately rockered front will still be able to carve pretty well - the limiting factors will be width and flex, not a bit of rocker - if you don't believe me you should try the Cochise or the upcoming Stockli 107, or for that matter any recent Mantra or Bonafide. IME, it's the tail, not the tip, that affects carving more. BTW, on a budget, you can forget about any of the skis I just mentioned. 

 

Also, you're not a super heavy guy, so also keep in mind that some of the skis you're hearing about (like the Cochise) are definitely more friendly to someone who weighs 190 or so. For instance, Fischer makes some nice wider skis (Big Stix) that carve really well for their category, and can be had at decent prices, and they have mild rocker. Drawbacks: Not chargers for bigger guys cuz the flex is a bit milder. Lively, which you may or may not like. And not a flex pattern that's ideal for the park. Which you brought up.

 

But your concern concerns me. You keep talking about charging hard and carving in the same sentence as a powder ski. And then you throw in stuff about parks and bumps. So sounds like speeding along won't be limited to your Prophet 90. A real powder ski is softer, will have more pronounced rocker, and is designed for float and ease in various kinds of turns, not charging. It generally will be easier to ski in the trees and bumps, while a big mountain design will be easier to handle in crud, firm or variable snow, and at speed. And parks will want a twin tip with fairly soft ends, which won't really like to crush crud at speed. 

 

Yeah, I know that you want One Ski to Rule Them All. But outside our fantasies, that ski will never exist. Any ski, no matter how much we love it, or how hard we think it rocks, or how much better it is than anything we've ever tried, blah blah blah, will have strengths and weaknesses. And if you're on a budget, you may have to put up with more of those tradeoffs. So seriously, suggest you think your priorities through before going any further on the thread. Then do your homework with some searches here or elsewhere, read some reviews. Don't waste your time or ours by just continuing to ask about a single alleged powder ski that can rock everywhere and is super cheap. 

post #9 of 27

check out the Rossi Sickle.  Moderate low rise tip/tail, 110mm.  Can probably find it for $400 or less.

post #10 of 27

Sorry to rain on our parade but buying a powder ski for the east is a bit silly unless you're spending considerable time in the backcountry around Stowe/Smuggler's Notch or Jay or MTW...we just don't get that much powder and what we get is gone before 10am.  Everybody knows where the stashes are at the ski areas.  So you want to buy a ski that is good for 2-3 runs 2-3 days per year?  That sounds like someone who has plenty of disposable income...why wouldn't the Prophets work?  How many days have you skied where they weren't good enough?

 

I should know...I have a pair of JJs that have exactly 4 hours on them (all at Alta)...I've had them for 2 winters.  My 94mm Wateas were great for Nemo at Magic.  Hiked for first tracks and caught 2nd chair but still only got 2 runs with completely untracked.  I didn't think I was missing anything not having the JJs.  Learn from my impulsiveness.  Save the money for a trip to Utah...

post #11 of 27

I recently saw a barely used stockli stormrider 110 tt go on ebay for 499 w bindings. that would probably fit what your looking for and be far better than anything within your budget that you could get new. However I do agree with above poster about the reality of getting much use out of these skis on the east coast.
 

post #12 of 27

Read up on the Nordica 'Helldorado" sounds pretty awesome, or, The Nordica 'Unleashed Hell' would also be something to consider.

DPS make a ski called the 'Wailer' which is 112 under boot, pretty expensive but could be the best powder ski around in that 110 under boot measurement.

 

These would be my pick for demoing as a powder ski that can hold edge well on the groomers.

 

good luck

post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 

Sigh... it's true. I have this addiction for ski gear like many of you here. Despite my girlfriend threatening to leave me if I bought another pair, not a day goes by without looking at pow skis. Yes, I don't need a pair of pow skis especially here in New England. But maybe you guys can just talk me out of it and make me save at least $400. 

 

I just came across Moment Jaguar Shark for $309 on eBay. The price is ridiculous. Any thoughts on these? 

post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by douismaximus View Post

 

But maybe you guys can just talk me out of it and make me save at least $400. 

 

I just came across Moment Jaguar Shark for $309 on eBay. The price is ridiculous. Any thoughts on these? 

Uh, isn't that what we've been trying to do? Seriously, go buy a ticket to Denver and then you won't have the cash left to buy skis. Or if you just can't get yourself to do that, limit yourself to cheap, comparatively moderate flex skis between 98 and 108 mm, which is a decent width and flex for NE trees, which are where you'll find the goods. Unless, as said, you live just down the road from Stowe or Jay. Which you don't.

 

The Shark, FWIW, is apparently a nice big mountain directional speeder. See reviews on TGR. Just what you need for tight lines with lotsa turns at moderate speeds in the woods. Buying it for back here will insure you won't scratch those nice garish graphics as it sits in the closet. Go for it! Such a deal! rolleyes.gif

post #15 of 27

what you should really do is mount alpine bindings on two snowboards and wear one on each foot this way if we get an 8' dump you are covered
 

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post

Sorry to rain on our parade but buying a powder ski for the east is a bit silly unless you're spending considerable time in the backcountry around Stowe/Smuggler's Notch or Jay or MTW...we just don't get that much powder and what we get is gone before 10am.  Everybody knows where the stashes are at the ski areas.  So you want to buy a ski that is good for 2-3 runs 2-3 days per year?  That sounds like someone who has plenty of disposable income...why wouldn't the Prophets work?  How many days have you skied where they weren't good enough?

 

I should know...I have a pair of JJs that have exactly 4 hours on them (all at Alta)...I've had them for 2 winters.  My 94mm Wateas were great for Nemo at Magic.  Hiked for first tracks and caught 2nd chair but still only got 2 runs with completely untracked.  I didn't think I was missing anything not having the JJs.  Learn from my impulsiveness.  Save the money for a trip to Utah...

I agree! I have a 98 mm Hell and Back that I really like ( fun also on piste)  but I used them only 2 times last winter... I mostly ski with 74 to 88mm skis for all around and 68 to 72 for carving...

post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 

I like that this thread went from "I'm looking for a new pair of skis, help me find one" to "I have a gear addiction. I need help."

post #18 of 27

roflmao.gif

 

You have no idea how right you are...

What do they say? It takes one to see one?

post #19 of 27

^^^^^ This is our danger-of-relapsing period, when leftovers at silly prices are calling out to us, and our brains want that little surge we get when we press "submit" on the purchase window. So we try to talk each other through it, point out how we really don't need the divorce/foreclosure/credit freeze/lack of groceries that will result from just-one-more-pair-will-give-me-a-perfect-quiver. If we can get to August, the new reviews will assure us that next season's models are So Much Better, which initiates our delayed-gratification period. Which overlaps with our maybe-we-should-actually-just-ski period. Which is conflated with our OMG-what-if-they-run-out-before-I-can-get-one period.

 

All the Good Skis are gone before Christmas, y'know. devil.gif

post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 

You know, this is helping. I already have two pairs of skis. I'm 32. I have a girlfriend whom I love very much. She wants all these nice things and if I were to buy another pair of skis which I assume will only be used less than 10 days during the whole season, I wouldn't have enough money to buy her all these purses, shoes, and dinner and whatever else she wants. 

 

.................

 

I could break up with her and pursue my hobbies. Then I could own at least two additional pairs!! duel.gif

post #21 of 27

You could do what I did- buy the skis then sell one of your other skis and tell your wife/girlfriend that you actually saved money because the ski retails for x and you only spent y, plus you got back z. heck i saved over a grand by selling my Kendos and buying stormrider 95s yahoo.gif- at least thats what I told my wife
 

post #22 of 27

I rarely venture out of the cycling forums this time of year.

 

all of your skis you listed will work.

 

ones I have skied

 

TSTs awesome east coast tree in a bunch of conditions not really a slacker any place else either easily the best in hard pack out of your listed skis. qcanoe has themm.....

JJ one of the best powder east coast tree skis out there better in powder than what I am going to recommend but not much better

 

what I would buy, and I am buying.....

 

Nordica Patron - its better on hardpack than anything listed here while being stupid good in powder. It weakness IMO is bumps because it so torisonally rigid and fairly shapely.

 

one I want to try....

 

Worth Magics..... smarytiak has them, as does dowork

 

Id stay away from the sharks unless your a true high expert and want a ski to charge on....

post #23 of 27

I'm bjohansson and I have a ski problem....

 

Just picked up a pair of Rossi S3's in Gear Swap.

 

So now I have

 

Dynamic VR17 (65mm)

Sultan 85 (85mm)

Watea 94 (94 mm)

S3 (98mm)  These will be mostly a touring rig for NELSAP areas

JJ's (115mm) Not sure I'll ever use these unless I go to Utah or Tahoe during a storm cycle.

 

I clearly need something in the 75-78 range as well as a 105....

post #24 of 27

I was pretty opposed to owning anything over 90 underfoot living three hours away from Southeastern and Midatlantic skiing.  Then somebody pointed out that Evo had a pair of 99 waist Elans with bindings listed for $179 shipped after a special discount code.  I figured WTF for that price and bought them in August that year.  Low and behold, we got three dumps over 20" the following season, one was over 30".  I skied all day practically by myself those days as even many resort employees didn't make it to work.  The one main summit lift was self service at the bottom with a ski patrollers taking turns watching the shut off button.  There have been several other days in the 8"-15" range but I usually run on a high 80 or low 90 for everything under a foot.

 

Anyway, I had the means to drop $180 and I still have some gently used 99s.  I know that isn't event that wide, but I don't regret buying them.  Cash is a lot tighter now so I have to say, smoke em if you got em.. If you have the cash to add a pair that fills a void in your quiver go ahead and do it.  You may not have the money when/if you have an opportunity to use that tool in the future.

post #25 of 27

Those suggestions from Josh, crgildart & others sound good...and don't listen to some of the cheap shots often thrown at us NE skiers...LOL.

You know what it's like to get out on a snowstorm day...  If you do ski them often enough you know how good the snow can be, particularly off-trail/resort in the more northerly areas of NewEngland.    Have been on high 80s & 90somethings mostly but, Fwiw, I'd like to find & hopefully try the Stockli 107 and Nordica Vagabond.

post #26 of 27

I agree w Bjohansson.  As a former East coast skier myself, I can count the number of powder days I had on one hand.  No need for a dedicated powder ski. You will be better served by learning to ski your 90mm skis in all conditions.

 

This advice need not apply if:  1) you take ski vacations to the west coast or 2) your job is flexible enough that you can take off work to catch the powder days.

post #27 of 27

Came across this thread in a search and even though it is a bit old, wanted to throw in.

 

Good advice on priorities of where to spend your money: girlfriend and/or trip out west prior to a ski purchase.  

 

I will add a third if you don't have it-dedicated snow tires.  We definitely do get powder days here on the East Coast.  You just need to get out for them.  I probably average 5-8 powder days a year in the East.  Ski less than that inbounds on non powder days in the East.  Rest of  my East days are BC.  Now that is a whole other level of gear addiction issues.

 

The ski I use for lift served the last three winters were the Fatypus Dsenders.  These are 112 at the waist and 184 long.  Prior to that it was a pair of Fischer Watea 101.  Both these skis have given me so much joy riding pow.  The Fatypus (why i moved on from the Fischer) are especially good in cut up snow.  Look for skis that are good for skiing cut up snow-usually this means damp, a bit heavier and a bit stiffer than a full on powder ski.  It is also my belief that a wide ski makes skiing over rocks easier as there is more surface and the ski is not as easily deflected.  And if you are going to ski eastern pow especially early season, you are going to ski over rocks.

 

A ski slightly over your budget is the moment Bibby on sale through their website.  I saw a pair of Moment PB&J new with Griffin bindings for $350 on ebay. If you storm chase in the East you definitely can get your powder days in and then you have skis you know for that trip out west.  Amortized over 4 seasons they are not a bad investment given the rewards they bring. 

 

Cheers

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