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P90X - Page 2

post #31 of 40

I agree with MattL -- your workout sounds more "Extreme" than mine does. I think the swimming is an inspired addition. 

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post
 

I'm not doing near what you are but in my opinion you are above and beyond P90X. Keep doing what you are doing and forget P90X!

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolo View Post
 

I agree with MattL -- your workout sounds more "Extreme" than mine does. I think the swimming is an inspired addition. 

 

I find the swimming is very useful -- it allows me to work out on days when my legs need a break, and seems to help my arms and legs complete their recovery from my prior intense days (I actually swim the day before each of my two intense days).  [The intense days are:

(1) hiking trail+plyos; (2) lifting.] Plus I'm lucky to have a 50 m ("long course") pool only a mile away, which makes the laps less tedious.  And I do the uphill sections of my speed hiking/trail runs using a pair of hiking poles* like a cross-country skier would, which helps to move part of the workload from my arms to my legs.  This not only gives me a better whole-body workout, but also makes it more intense aerobically --- and if I also go to a place that gives me +7000 feet of altitude over where I live, combined with sustained, steep uphill sections, I find I can readily (feels very strenuous, but not painful) hold at 90% of my max HR for two or three repeated 20-minute stretches -- no way I'd be able to do that with P90X or anything else (at least not without a whole lot of pain).  However, after doing something like this, I need time to recover before doing it again.  So, to summarize my workout routine, I only do sustained intense workouts twice/week; other days are more moderate, with only brief periods of intensity (including the swimming, where my HR doesn't spend much time above 130).  The difference, then, with P90X, is that somehow people do sustained intense workouts 6x/week -- something I could not do with my current workouts.  So I guess my question is whether there's something extraordinarily clever about P90X that allows someone that couldn't avoid injury if he did my current workouts intensely 6 days/week, to somehow avoid it with the P90X workouts.  I suspect the answer is no -- that the difference between my workout routine and P90X is that I do extremely intense workouts twice a week, and moderate workouts on other days, whereas P90X does moderately intense workouts six days/week. [Which I guess raises the question of whether I might continue with my current routine, but experiment with changing it to one that is moderately intense five or six days/week --  for instance, I could do two light lifting sessions instead of one heavy one, etc...]

 

But I'd still be curious to hear from someone that has done both.   Maybe we could get tenpenny to chime in, who, depending on its intensity, may have had a routine comparable to mine (soccer, hockey, and mtn. biking, 1x/week each, plus lifting 2-3x/week) before switching to P90X:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tenpenny View Post
 

I did the full P90X program last year prior to ski season and it was definitely one of the best pre-season workouts I've done.  I can't speak to whether "muscle confusion" is legit or not, but each of the daily workouts are intense and varied enough that it keeps it interesting.  That said, I think just about any program where you work out at that intensity for over an hour per day for 6 days will give you results as long as the exercises are quality.

 

I was only able to manage about 5 days a week instead of the 6 just due to my schedule, so it took me slightly longer than 90 days to complete the program, but I still got great results.  I started out in pretty good athletic shape, playing soccer and hockey each once a week, mountain biking maybe once a week, and lifting weights at the gym 2-3 times a week.  I was probably still about 10-12 lbs overweight prior to starting mainly due to my beer addiction.  At the end of the program I lost nearly all of it and was probably in the best shape of my adult life.  I didn't do any of the meal plans or other cross-sell BS that is recommended with the program.

 

For ski prep, I can definitely say the combination of the legs workout, plyo workout, and core workout really prepare your legs and core for Day 1 of the season.  Last season was probably the first time ever I had no soreness after my first day out after skiing almost the entire day.

 

 

[*If you have access to sustained uphill terrain and want to try hiking poles, I would recommend (if possible) first renting a pair of adjustable ones from a local outdoors store.   If you like using them, and you don't mind spending spending some money, I'd highly recommend the Gossamer Gear LT4S -- they're comfortable, adjustable and, of particular importance when trying to move quickly, probably still the lightest ones on the market -- 4.1 oz each if you ditch the (unnecessary, IMO) baskets.]


Edited by chemist - 11/5/13 at 6:23pm
post #33 of 40

Open question to both chemist and active P90Xers:

 

 

How do you modify your pre-season workout to fit around the time cost and lack of recovery time when the season starts?

post #34 of 40

I consider skiing my workout that day and on off-skiing days I continue cycling through my training calendar. 

post #35 of 40

I consider skiing comparable in its effect on my body to my trail running and plyometrics. So on weeks when I'm skiing locally (say, 2 days/week), I don't do my plyos or my trail running -- skiing substitutes for them.   And while I still lift, I back off on the weights -- especially the lower body stuff.  But I'll continue to swim and do my martial arts and of course my stretching.  The main thing is to listen to your body and feel what works.

 

If I'm away on a ski trip and skiing every day, the only other exercises I do are generally stretching plus some of my martial arts forms (helps to mobilize the joints).  If I decide to take a day off in the middle of a ski week and a pool is available, I might swim.  I will definitely not lift weights, since I don't want to be recovering from them when I ski! I know some people do yoga in the mornings before skiing, but I wouldn't recommend it unless you're already a regular practitioner.

post #36 of 40

^^^ although I don't do martial arts, P90x does have its Kenpo workout (not comparable but it does kick ass) :D  I agree, you have to listen to your body. I do find that part of overall fitness includes good nutrition. Eating well (this is a whole thread in itself) , little to no alcohol (huge) and some supplements like a B complex, D, Creatine (10grams per day) Glutamine (~8 grams) seem to help shorten the recovery time. I also eat a lot of fruits too (blueberries and similar). i try to eliminate all  processed foods, any artificial flavors or colors, no sodas. Grass fed beef, organic chicken/pork and non-farmed fish. Organic veggies too. If I don't eat organic veggies, I throughly wash them to try to get as much pesticides off them, (I wash organic veggies too)  .  Lastly, I m a big fan of massage therapy from a therapist who specializes in working in sport related massage therapy. 

post #37 of 40

It also depends on how you split up your weight lifting. I do only one muscle group per workout (I'm not on P90X) so I have multiple recovery days in between. I do it mostly due to time constraints but I also can't lift as hard as I could when I was younger. This way I can hit each muscle group harder than I would if I were doing multiple per day. I try to do cardio every other day and abs/core every other day at least.

 

If you were lifting like me you could lift 6-7 days per week with much less risk of injury. I tend to have full rest days every 2-3 days though, again due to time but also a little laziness or just being tired at times.

 

My workouts are considering moderate to many people though. I'm not training for the Olympics so I don't push too hard. I would rather go 80% and be able to keep working out than go 100% and risk injury.

post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

^^^ although I don't do martial arts, P90x does have its Kenpo workout (not comparable but it does kick ass) :D  I agree, you have to listen to your body. I do find that part of overall fitness includes good nutrition. Eating well (this is a whole thread in itself) , little to no alcohol (huge) and some supplements like a B complex, D, Creatine (10grams per day) Glutamine (~8 grams) seem to help shorten the recovery time. I also eat a lot of fruits too (blueberries and similar). i try to eliminate all  processed foods, any artificial flavors or colors, no sodas. Grass fed beef, organic chicken/pork and non-farmed fish. Organic veggies too. If I don't eat organic veggies, I throughly wash them to try to get as much pesticides off them, (I wash organic veggies too)  .  Lastly, I m a big fan of massage therapy from a therapist who specializes in working in sport related massage therapy.

That's how it's done,good work.

If your looking to add to your recovery you should try http://www.proanox.com/.

I used it for a couple of years now it works great

post #39 of 40

About a month ago I added a new whole-body core exercise, that I think is excellent, and also provides a fun challenge -- the hanging windshield wiper:  

It's somewhat advanced, so you need to be careful with it -- there are probably tutorials on youtube that can help you work up to it.

 

 

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by evaino View Post
 

 

I actually wrote an article about it on my blog here: http://elsbethvaino.com/2011/04/stop-confusing-your-muscles/ Similar to what was noted above. In fact here's an analogy I used:

 

"Training by always shocking your body with new exercises is akin to learning music by taking piano on Monday, clarinet on Wednesday and violin on Friday, followed by drums, trombone, and guitar the following week. At the end of two weeks you have tried 6 instruments, but can you do anything with any of them?"

 

There are much better approaches. That said, if you love it, it gets you the results you want, and it's not getting you injured, then awesome. 

 

Elsbeth

 

Excellent post.  This is a complementary read, http://www.scienceofrunning.com/2013/12/why-crossfit-worksbut-really-doesnt.html .

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