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What size Cochise?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I am considering a pair of Blizzard Cochise and unsure about the length.  I'm 5'9..172lbs, aggressive and athletic skier, and skiing mostly in Europe.  Considering their rocker, they probably ski shorter than actual length?  If the case, then maybe the 185 would be the way to go?  Thanks.

post #2 of 9
The Cochise skis pretty close to its advertised length, the rocker hs little or no effect on how long the Cochise skis. You could go with a 177 for nimbleness or the 185 for power. Not a wrong call either way, depending on what you want out of the ski.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the reply.  I like nimbleness and power.  If I correctly understand their construction, these skis would have enough power at the 177 length, but will they also be stable at speed?  Thanks again for your input.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

The Cochise skis pretty close to its advertised length, the rocker hs little or no effect on how long the Cochise skis. You could go with a 177 for nimbleness or the 185 for power. Not a wrong call either way, depending on what you want out of the ski.

x 2 on Philpugs comments. Minimal rocker means entire edge of ski engages when rolled on edge so there is no shortening effect from rocker. My wife and I both have 2 seasons on our Cochises and love the skis. I'm 6'2" and 185 lbs on the 185 and she is 5'5" and 105 lbs on the 177 but she is a power skier who wants a big, stable ski. If you are into nimble the 177 will have all the stability you will need at mortal speeds. One tip - remember to pivot your short (trees, chutes, etc.) turns from the knees down and don't do old school unweight the tails and drive the tips turns.

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle Dave View Post

One tip - remember to pivot your short (trees, chutes, etc.) turns from the knees down and don't do old school unweight the tails and drive the tips turns.

 

I am 5'4" 160lbs and was on a 177cm Cochise this year. Definitely agree to pivot short turns. But.... and I am sure this is my issue and not the Cochise,  when skiing flat and pivoting the tips tended to wander a bit. I have the topsheet chips on the tips to prove it. I felt way more comfortable driving the tips. Any suggestions on how to control the tips when skiing flat?

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainy512Day View Post

 

I am 5'4" 160lbs and was on a 177cm Cochise this year. Definitely agree to pivot short turns. But.... and I am sure this is my issue and not the Cochise,  when skiing flat and pivoting the tips tended to wander a bit. I have the topsheet chips on the tips to prove it. I felt way more comfortable driving the tips. Any suggestions on how to control the tips when skiing flat?

FWIW I tend to sometimes drive them into turns old school too but that's just because I'm old. The pivot thing only applies to tight turns with no carve and if the tips only wander then sorry to say it's probably you  especially if you tend to get in the back seat in tight situations

or your boots are loose. Anywhere other than tight spots especially anywhere easy enough to ski with the ski flat you need to turn using the edges, no pivot. They actually ski best from a slightly centered stance where you roll the ski onto the edge and enjoy the ride. Roll and Rip but no pop from turn to turn as there is no camber. I have never had an issue with 'wandering' when skied flat. It might also be your tune. The stock Blizzard tune is very aggressive and the last thing the ski will do is wander however if you have had them detuned or base bevelled too much that could be a problem.

If you want to practice tip control, side slip (no edge engagement at all) perpendicular to the fall line on a groomed intermediate run until you can continuously side slip 100 yards or more with no crossing tips or tails. With the slight tip and tail rocker the skis love to do this and are famous for their ability to 'slarve' drifting sideways down the hill. Much fun!!

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle Dave View Post

If you want to practice tip control, side slip (no edge engagement at all) perpendicular to the fall line on a groomed intermediate run until you can continuously side slip 100 yards or more with no crossing tips or tails.

 

This sort of thing is also *really* fun to do on the Cochise.

 

Anyway, I basically agree with what Phil said.  The 185's ski to that length.  177 will be better for tight trees and bumps, while the 185 will be better for high speed open run-outs and bowls.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

The Cochise skis pretty close to its advertised length, the rocker hs little or no effect on how long the Cochise skis. You could go with a 177 for nimbleness or the 185 for power. Not a wrong call either way, depending on what you want out of the ski.

I demoed the 185 and it skied well. But I think I would buy the 177. Particularly if you are going to ski any kind of bumps even soft and round or otherwise

 

At 108 underfoot and a 28.5M radius in a 185 is alot of ski. I am close to 6' 183 lbs. My 27 year old racer son (still wins Masters events) at 225 lbs and 6'1" thought the 193 was too big and he normally skis a 186 Monster 88 or a 188 27M Head i.GS RD HE would buy the 185.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle Dave View Post

FWIW I tend to sometimes drive them into turns old school too but that's just because I'm old. The pivot thing only applies to tight turns with no carve and if the tips only wander then sorry to say it's probably you  especially if you tend to get in the back seat in tight situations

or your boots are loose. Anywhere other than tight spots especially anywhere easy enough to ski with the ski flat you need to turn using the edges, no pivot. They actually ski best from a slightly centered stance where you roll the ski onto the edge and enjoy the ride. Roll and Rip but no pop from turn to turn as there is no camber. I have never had an issue with 'wandering' when skied flat. It might also be your tune. The stock Blizzard tune is very aggressive and the last thing the ski will do is wander however if you have had them detuned or base bevelled too much that could be a problem.

If you want to practice tip control, side slip (no edge engagement at all) perpendicular to the fall line on a groomed intermediate run until you can continuously side slip 100 yards or more with no crossing tips or tails. With the slight tip and tail rocker the skis love to do this and are famous for their ability to 'slarve' drifting sideways down the hill. Much fun!!

 



Hey Dave thank for the advice. I will play around with it next season ...

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