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Ski Resort Marketing 101

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Time for a chuckle with summer camps starting.

 

post #2 of 16

Posted once before, but same idea.
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


Posted once before, but same idea.

 

THAT makes me want to visit Whitefish.

 

I loved that video.  icon14.gificon14.gif

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


Posted once before, but same idea.

That almost totally sums up my experience at Whitefish. The guide doing the ski tour wouldn't go up, told us not to ski...

post #5 of 16

I do A lot of fishing , The fishing guides do the same thing

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveB View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post




Posted once before, but same idea.
That almost totally sums up my experience at Whitefish. The guide doing the ski tour wouldn't go up, told us not to ski...

Was that on a Friday, March 1? I hope this was not a resort Ambassador, just a guide from a touring company or something?
post #7 of 16

It was a resort Ambassador who was supposed to do the free tour. I wanted the tour to figure good places to wait out/deal with the fog (i.e. tree runs that were open). It was an awful day to ski, could barely see from low cloud ball to the next low cloud ball in places. Plus half way down it turned into velcro. It was the 13th of March.  

post #8 of 16
I missed that day.. Skied the day before that and the day after, but on the 13th was home with a migraine. Looks like it was well timed. The day before was GREAT.

Can't imagine any of the Ambassadors I know saying that. We'd just had a lot of fresh snow on the 12th, should certainly have been good in the trees.
post #9 of 16

At Sun Peaks we don't have Fog Balls...sorry, Low Cloud Balls; they just use straight fog poles in the Alpine and they leave them in the snow pack all winter. People only ask "What are those black poles for" on sunny days. On the foggy days they of course end up skiing pole to pole and very thankful that the poles are there.

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

At Sun Peaks we don't have Fog Balls...sorry, Low Cloud Balls; they just use straight fog poles in the Alpine and they leave them in the snow pack all winter. People only ask "What are those black poles for" on sunny days. On the foggy days they of course end up skiing pole to pole and very thankful that the poles are there.

Don't they get run over by grooming machines?  Ours get taken down every night and stuck in if needed the next day...eventually.  Problem is, people steal them, intentionally do tricks off them and knock them over in the process, throw them to the side of the trail, etc.  

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveB View Post

That almost totally sums up my experience at Whitefish. The guide doing the ski tour wouldn't go up, told us not to ski...

Shoulda gone to Fernie.

post #12 of 16

Live and learn....

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

At Sun Peaks we don't have Fog Balls...sorry, Low Cloud Balls; they just use straight fog poles in the Alpine and they leave them in the snow pack all winter. People only ask "What are those black poles for" on sunny days. On the foggy days they of course end up skiing pole to pole and very thankful that the poles are there.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Don't they get run over by grooming machines?  Ours get taken down every night and stuck in if needed the next day...eventually.  Problem is, people steal them, intentionally do tricks off them and knock them over in the process, throw them to the side of the trail, etc.  

 

At Sun Peaks the fog poles are made from 6' or7' 2x4s cut lengthwise and painted black. The fog mostly occurs on the upper 1000' of vertical on the mountain and so if someone wanted to steal a fog pole they would need to ski with if for over 2000' vertical to get it to the parking lot.... not going to happen.

 

The fog poles are mostly used on runs that don't get groomed and people don't seem to bother messing with them very much. It helps I guess that on foggy days most skiers stay on the lower mountain and for those who go up top there are half a dozen runs that have enough trees around that the fog effect is lessened.

 

Come to think of it these days there are fewer runs that have fog poles, only 3 I think, when there used to be more than half a dozen fog poled runs. I guess as the resort has expanded to more fog free terrain the need for fog poles has lessened.

post #14 of 16
That's interesting they don't put them on groomed runs. To me it's the trails with less surface "texture" that need them the most. Flat light plus flat snow is what gives me vertigo--like the Anthill. I guess if the fog is REALLY dense the texture thing stops helping, but the texture thing IS helping, then I might not consider that to be especially foggy. After that one half chair day, I have vowed to never complain about two chair again!!!

Did they plant trees on the runs that used to have the markers or did they just stop making new markers when the old ones got broken?
Edited by sibhusky - 5/30/13 at 10:25am
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

That's interesting they don't put them on groomed runs. To me it's the trails with less surface "texture" that need them the most. Flat light plus flat snow is what gives me vertigo--like the Anthill. I guess if the fog is REALLY dense the texture thing stops helping, but then I might not consider that to be especially foggy, either. After that one half chair day, I have vowed to never complain about two chair again!!!

Did they plant trees on the runs that used to have the markers or did they just stop making new markers when the old ones got broken?

No trees planted. I think that they just got lazy and figure that they don't really need that many fog pole runs as the mountain nowadays usually has 1.5 lifts in the fog and 4.5 lifts below the fog on foggy days.

 

Also in my previous post when sighting only 3 fog pole runs, I forgot about some runs so it is more like half a dozen fog poled runs.

 

As far as skiing in the fog, if there is no fresh snow, then I prefer smooth groomed runs where there are no surprises from unseen irregularities or bumps.

post #16 of 16
I realize I said something backwards, that if it were really dense I wouldn't consider that foggy. Wasn't what I meant to say, so reworded it to say if it's really dense texture doesn't help. I agree that if you can't see ANYTHING, I like consistent surfaces. I've run INTO trees that were completely rime-covered.
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