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Expert ski tuition DVD's?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I am looking for "expert" ski tuition DVD(s).  The advanced DVD previews I have seen online are intermediate.  Furthermore I have to be careful when renting a ski instructor as more often than not I am better than they are and end up wasting my money.  

 

I am into carving, moguls and freeride.  A DVD that covers one of these disiplines would be great, if they cover all that would be even better.  

 

Thanks.   

 

 

post #2 of 22

Maybe try Warren smith skiing academy.  Here's some previews from dvd that might help.  

 

Carving

 

Freeride

 

Moguls

 

There's no PSIA or CSIA dvds that I know of unless someone would like to correct me, but lots of free tactical vids and drills but you don't get them explained to you like above

 

CSIA advanced stuff

 

 

Obviously if you like the way Harold Harb and his system skis then he's the source!

 

Another one that looks promising is Paul Lorenz (Australian demo team) but not sure if it's completed

 

Hope this is helpful.

 

Anyone else got good videos?

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi jthski,

 

many thanks for the uploads!  

 

I've known about Warren Smith for sometime.  Actually got a lesson off him when I was a kid.  But unfortunately his DVD's are a bit too basic for me. 

 

The CSIA clips certainly have some interesting aspects that I could aim to mimic, one of which is the 'dolphin' turn which I have seen clips of Harold Harb demonstrate.  Generally though, as far as Harold's skiing goes, he has some interesting, progressive techniques however, essentially what he is doing in a lot of his turns is starting a carve and finishing it with a skid (something he would describe as 'sliding').  I have thought quite hard about his technique and have decided that its actually a good an interesting tool but only for steep terrain when you want to maintain a controlled speed and continues turns.  The technique is also not so far removed from mogul techniques and of course, freeride in so far that skis close together give better float.  

 

I was in France a few weeks back and there were junior national skiers getting from France, Italy and Switzerland getting trained by the French Academy.  Needless to say these kids were phenomenal.  They trained on a couple of long slopes in Motteret and I stayed on the slopes, a few hundred yards behind copying what I could.  Generally I was doing most of what they were doing (other than some skid turns that looked similar to some of Harold's stuff) but also a really fluid technique whereby the skis are in a constant controlled arch carve in short radius turns (no skidding whatsoever) and the speed is very well controlled even on steep terrain.  I saw this technique (done well) once before by a skier wearing an Andorra labelled jacket (I assume an instructor) back at an indoor ski centre near London.  I have no idea how to do it though.  Really want to get my hands on some instruction for that technique, can't seem to find it anywhere.  Such a beautiful way to ski.  

 

 

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Woops, missed the Paul Lorenz clip.  I think I could learn quite a lot from his mogul techniques.  Some of his techniques appear similar to Harold's but not all.  He too is a bit overkill with the 'two footed release' but there is certainly more diversity to his skiing than Harold's.  

 

If I were to buy a DVD to learn this aspect of skiing, I would for sure choose Paul Lorenz over Harold's based on these previews.  

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

In fact, are see how this post plays out, but for sure currently Paul Lorenz is top of the list for my DVD(s) instruction purchase.  

 

Thanks jthski!

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

As you said though the release date may be a little while yet.  Can't actually find the release date but if trailers are already online, can't be too long.  

post #7 of 22

post #8 of 22

This is the most downloaded ski instruction clip on YouTube and of someone at 'expert' level, this would be very basic, but when Klaus let's it rip, few are as good as he is, very select few:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlzIkIQa3e0&list=FLlX4GCi6wcz5JjY1Qv_5dnw&index=47

 

And his ski DVD is at his website or on Amazon for that matter: While I am no one to judge, would heartily suggest, does not matter how good you are, this guy can offer you great advice:

http://www.sofaskischool.com

 

Again,  one expert will recognize an uber-performer, and you can correspond with him, he is quite friendly and easy to get on with and seek out the right advice.

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lex007 View Post

The CSIA clips certainly have some interesting aspects that I could aim to mimic, one of which is the 'dolphin' turn which I have seen clips of Harold Harb demonstrate.  

 

 

I think you're putting the cart before the horse here (finally an occasion to properly use that expression!). Drills are tools that allow you to isolate and develop one specific skill. They're useful when methodically chosen with a specific development goal in mind (e.g. improving your stance/balance) and under the watchful eye of an instructor (who can give you feedback on your performance and adjust the drill to meet your needs). They don't represent a general way of skiing, and add no benefit without understanding why you're doing an exercise and verifying you're creating the outcome. 

 

What I'm saying is it's important to understand what your development opportunities are, strategize how to develop them, get feedback on if you're achieving success, apply adjustment to the development activity if necessary, and blend it back into your skiing once success is achieved. Watching the CSIA videos and trying to copy drills, or trying to just do a dolphin turn for the sake of it, aren't really good uses of your time. It's also why I pull my hair out every time someone posts that video of the racer girls that starts with "these drills will help you become a better skier." huh?!

 

That said, if you already understand which skills you need to further develop, watching some videos could give you good imagery of outcomes you want to produce. The CSIA Level 4 standards (and likely the 3 standards) are good for developing your imagery. Josh Foster has great tactical tips on youtube that will help you. JF Beaulieu and Sebastien Michel have great skiing clips that can inspire. Off the top of my head, rollo, heluvaskier, blake saunders, bob barnes, josh matta are all posters here whose videos demonstrate skiing that many skiers dream of achieving.  

 

Any way you can get an in-person lesson with a CSIA level 4 instructor? 

post #10 of 22

I agree with most of your points Metaphor...you can't substitute for a really good eye and development coach/mentor, and perhaps we are very lucky to have some of the best in the CSIA help us but maybe OP doesn't have the access or afford the prices these guys command?  

 

I have found instructional videos from DVDs and clips very helpful and learnt some drills never shown to me by my current trainers.  You certainly can learn from DVDs and clips, especially if you are a visual learner and can get video of yourself to compare.  The most important thing is WHY? and HOW to do it properly.  The CSIA drills package or the clips of the girls don't explain why, so pretty useless, unless you know the purpose, HOW it will develop your skiing and when it applies to you.  The Warren Smith clips are very good, although simple as they explain why and how, and has good biomechanical basis for it, but then you need to know what you are working on first....

 

Feedback junkies rarely get anything new.  What we are working on would hardly change overnight, especially at the higher levels and if OP knew what that is, he can certainly benefit from getting tips from videos....but you are right it's no substitute for a good instructor's feedback.  biggrin.gif

 

 

 

Quote:
The advanced DVD previews I have seen online are intermediate.

 

What do you mean by this? What would your like to see in them?  What do you aim to learn from DVDs?  What do you hope they will add to your skiing?  Don't forget drills need not to be difficult or complex to be effective as long as they develop the right 'feelings' and movement patterns that apply to you.

 

BTW I've got a couple of Richard Berger's Videos form an Austrian friend, it has some great stuff but I can't understand German or Japanese :(  Has anyone found any in English?

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 

Many thanks guys for posts!  

post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 

I am from England UK, near London so nowhere near any ski mountains.  The only time I get in the mountains is on annual leave, whereby I will wax the lot on skiing.  I grew up near a dry ski slope which is now an indoor centre.  I have had very few official lessons in my time but have had a lot of useful coaching off my Dad when growing up but mostly, especially as an adult the skiing has come naturally.  I am very visual in my learning in that really, when I see something I can generally copy it but if I had to tell you what I was doing, I generally couldn't.  I find the Warren Smith videos way too technical, furthermore, they arn't showing me anything I can't already do.  I work well with getting some video footage of me and seeing what I am doing wrong, I will debate the footage with my Dad who is far more technically minded than me.  I have some clips of my skiing on my computer but don't know how to upload onto this (maybe someone could advice me), I don't want to put them on youtube though.  

 

For sure a quality coach is ideal but unfortunately, at least around here, most of the instructors arn't as good as me, although there is an old boy that I think heads the race team.  I watched him ski the other day and for sure there are a few things I could learn from him.  

 

I think DVD's have the potential to be useful and of course sourcing a good coach for when on the mountains would be good.  I am wary of Warren Smith though, one of his squad is teaching at my local centre at the moment and I don't think that much of his skiing.      

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

A couple good options I have are to join the race team (regular slalom) as well as up at an indoor centre in Manchester (2.5hr drive), there is a proper mogul training weekend once a month, all year round on comp style course.  I want to do both of these but on-top of that I am trying to improve my general skiing.  

post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

 

Not me; but this is what they do up at Manchester once a month.  Sometimes with kickers in the course.  

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yeah, nice skier, however as you said, nothing new here, I can do what he does, but not quite as stylishly.  

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

Above post was for dustyfog

post #17 of 22

lex007

 

 Try checking out " Your ski coach"  web site I never bought Ricks DVDs yet but from first hand experience I do have a very strong understanding of how drills can improve skiing. I tried some of his drills from his site & was amazed how much my skiing improved. I have looked @ purchasing DVDs as well & I think Rick might be the drills DVD chief. Harold Harp I think is on to something as well.

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

I think you're putting the cart before the horse here (finally an occasion to properly use that expression!). Drills are tools that allow you to isolate and develop one specific skill. They're useful when methodically chosen with a specific development goal in mind (e.g. improving your stance/balance) and under the watchful eye of an instructor (who can give you feedback on your performance and adjust the drill to meet your needs). They don't represent a general way of skiing, and add no benefit without understanding why you're doing an exercise and verifying you're creating the outcome. 

 

What I'm saying is it's important to understand what your development opportunities are, strategize how to develop them, get feedback on if you're achieving success, apply adjustment to the development activity if necessary, and blend it back into your skiing once success is achieved. Watching the CSIA videos and trying to copy drills, or trying to just do a dolphin turn for the sake of it, aren't really good uses of your time. It's also why I pull my hair out every time someone posts that video of the racer girls that starts with "these drills will help you become a better skier." huh?!

 

That said, if you already understand which skills you need to further develop, watching some videos could give you good imagery of outcomes you want to produce. The CSIA Level 4 standards (and likely the 3 standards) are good for developing your imagery. Josh Foster has great tactical tips on youtube that will help you. JF Beaulieu and Sebastien Michel have great skiing clips that can inspire. Off the top of my head, rollo, heluvaskier, blake saunders, bob barnes, josh matta are all posters here whose videos demonstrate skiing that many skiers dream of achieving.  

 

Any way you can get an in-person lesson with a CSIA level 4 instructor? 

 

 

Your absolutely right regarding the necessity to understand why to do do drills which is why I would like informative info thats right for me.  Regarding the dolphin turn; I can see the benefit for odd times I may lose contact with a mogul.  But your right, I am not entirely sure what other benefit it serves, other than it looks kinda cool.  I currently do what I would call 'popping' but I don't know the real name, when I am doing short turns, I sometimes, jump between the carve, sometimes on-purpose, sometimes not.

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi Powder Jet.  Thanks for upload.  I am checking out the website at the mo.  Looks great.  There is a lot of info to take in, so will report back in a bit.  

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi Powder Jet,

 

I have had a good look over the website.

 

The Advanced Balance DVD with 47 drill exercises looks very interesting.  The Advanced Edging sounds quite basic.  "In Advanced Edging we move from steering, and into carving  skills."

 

Also the Introduction to Racing DVD looks like a good source of info, especially as I am looking to get into slalom (something I have done a bit of before but never really committed to but would very much like to take up now).

 

Which DVD's did you get?  

 

 

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lex007 View Post

Hi Powder Jet,

 

I have had a good look over the website.

 

The Advanced Balance DVD with 47 drill exercises looks very interesting.  The Advanced Edging sounds quite basic.  "In Advanced Edging we move from steering, and into carving  skills."

 

Also the Introduction to Racing DVD looks like a good source of info, especially as I am looking to get into slalom (something I have done a bit of before but never really committed to but would very much like to take up now).

 

Which DVD's did you get?  

 

 

 

Lex,

 

Rick Schnellman's DVDs are full of drills whose purpose is to give you multiple experiences so you can decide what works for you.  For instance, in the Basic Balance DVD (the first one) there are all kinds of drills for one-ski skiing.  You'd think that DVD would be easy since it's set up to be the most basic, but many of its drills are surprisingly difficult.

 

Basic Edging teaches all kinds of edge manipulations that you can do to change the turn shape.  Again, it's full of unexpected drills that give you multiple experiences you wouldn't have if you just went out skiing.  You're supposed to work your way through the drills in order; one usually builds on the previous one.  It takes time and determination to stick with the program as it's set up.  Of course anyone can cheat and skip around.  (I did.)

 

You decide how to use the stuff you learn about how those movements affect the way the skis behave.  You won't know unless you succeed in doing the drill right, and that involves staying balanced while doing it.  This is not as easy as you might think, no matter how "natural" your skills acquisition seems to be.  

 

The last two DVDs are more technical; they assume you have been through the first four DVDs and understand the terminology introduced and you've acquired the balance to do the drills introduced in them.  I've found the terms he uses to describe the technical issues of skiing clarify a lot of the verbal-mumbo-jumbo you'll encounter here at Epic in the technical discussions.  

 

Don't discount the usefulness of the two "basic" DVDs just because you feel you can ski well, nor the "Advanced Balance" and "Advanced Edging" DVDs.  Much of what he teaches will still take some concerted effort to incorporate into your skiing, if you choose to go with his videos.  

post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi LiquidFeet, thanks for your post.  

 

So you are confirming that there really is benefit in following the "Your ski coach" course from beginning to end.  In that case I will take your word.  I will go for this course, but no doubt combine some other DVD's (Paul Lorenz looks really good) and actual live tuition to the mix, over time.  Lots of homework, lol.  I'm at that stage now where I really want to develop my skiing and I'm finding learning fun whereas when I was younger I just liked to ski.  

 

Thanks!  

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