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Dynastar Speed Course TI bindings / mounting. / tuning tips needed

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks to feedback from this list I just ordered a pair of Dynastar Speed Course TIs (2013 in 177 and 1/2 off). Now I need binding suggestions along with any mounting and first time grooming tips I should pass along to my local ski shop.

I'm 5'11" 280 pound male who is just getting back to skiing since stopping close to 15 years ago because of a knee injury. I primarily ski Nee Jersey and Vermont with my 6 year old who was my I inspiration to get back on the slopes. My boot is a new Technica HVL. I mostly just cruise shorter radius turns.

What binding(s) should I look at for cruising and will give me the best release. I see the look PX 12 or 14s are recommended, what are they like? I purchased the skis over the Internet but plan on buying the bindings locally.

Finally I have read about issues with correct binding placement and getting a certain type of first tune (degrees ? edges ?). What are your thoughts

Thanks
Ricky
post #2 of 23
Thread Starter 
Sorry I meant first time tuning (not grooming).
post #3 of 23

Hey Ricky,

I ski-own the non TI version( no metal) and I have a 1D base/3D side bevels and the ski holds like a hockey skate. I ski primarily in NH & Maine and these bevel setting allow for any turn shape I like and holds well on the Ice I routinely ski them on.

As far as bindings go, I believe you are limited to the PX 12 or 14 on these because of rail plate on the ski. At 280lbs I think you will be fine with the Look PX 14.

If you like hard snow carving, you will love these skis.

can I ask, what Interent site did you get them at? I heard they are discontinuing the speed course TI and I would love to get a back up pair at a good price. For eastern skiing, They are that good!

post #4 of 23

Go with the 14's at minimum. My understanding the heel is better in the 14's. I would even look at the PX 15's as they will fit also depending on your DIN setting.

 

Depending on where you got you skis (from what I've read on this group) some come with a factory tune and some don't.  I got the Speed Course FIS with a factory tune as per their spec of 0.5/4 but some have written that some come 0/0 so check.  If you go with the factory recommendations the ski with carve through anything, but it will require that you stay on top of it or it can get a little punishing if you make a mistake.

 

This is my favorite ski.

post #5 of 23
That plate will also take a pivot. The pivot will give you the performance of the px14 but much lighter and a lower swing weight. I have narrow brake assemblies if you need.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
can I ask, what Interent site did you get them at? I heard they are discontinuing the speed course TI and I would love to get a back up pair at a good price. For eastern skiing, They are that good!

Thanks. I purchased them from suburban ski and bike. Al's ski equipment barn also had them.

http://suburbanskiandbike.com/
http://www.untracked.com/
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
I ski-own the non TI version( no metal) and I have a 1D base/3D side bevels and the ski holds like a hockey skate. I ski primarily in NH & Maine and these bevel setting allow for any turn shape I like and holds well on the Ice I routinely ski them on.

Basil

Excuse my ignorance but can you explain what 1d / 3d means? Is that more toward the recreational / cruising end of the spectrum?
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
What is the spectrum for a more forgiving tune?
post #9 of 23

That means 1 degree base bevel and 3 degree side bevel. It's a good setup for skiing recreationally on hard surfaces. Some prefer a 1/2 because it doesn't require as much resharpening. Racers typically use a .5 to .75 base and a 3 side. The amount of base bevel determines how quickly the ski edge engages as you go off a flat base. 1 is fairly universal for good skiers, at least for narrower skis. Soe have been arguing for a 2 on powder skis, but suspect they want it so they can smear and slide more easily.

 

Below 1, the ski feels "quicker," eg, less time to engage, but that may feel like grabby if you're not prepared. The side bevel simply determines how acute the angle of the edge is, lower numbers mean more acute, so will feel "sharper," but will also get dull faster. IMO it doesn't really affect the edge to edge feel of the ski, although a freshly tuned ski obviously hold better, eg, dig into a hard surface a little better, so it may feel more stabile in the arc.  

 

As far as "forgiving," I suppose a 1/2 would feel more so, although keep in mind that losing an edge in the middle of a turn can be just as damaging to your body as having an edge remain in the turn. So either way, keep them sharp. I'd stay away from any base bevel below 1, though. 

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks
post #11 of 23

Thanks. I found these sites this year and they have good prices on ski equipment. I saw that someone else already answered the bevel degrree question very nicely already for you.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

That plate will also take a pivot. The pivot will give you the performance of the px14 but much lighter and a lower swing weight. I have narrow brake assemblies if you need.

Phil, do you know if the pivot / fks will also fit on the ibox style plate that some of the rossis and dynastars have? Or am I limited to the px style heel on that plate?
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Phil, do you know if the pivot / fks will also fit on the ibox style plate that some of the rossis and dynastars have? Or am I limited to the px style heel on that plate?
no, you are limited to the px.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Phil, do you know if the pivot / fks will also fit on the ibox style plate that some of the rossis and dynastars have? Or am I limited to the px style heel on that plate?
no, you are limited to the px.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Phil, do you know if the pivot / fks will also fit on the ibox style plate that some of the rossis and dynastars have? Or am I limited to the px style heel on that plate?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

no, you are limited to the px.

 

To be more specific, the PX Racing (which has a shorter rear track)

post #16 of 23

A few years back I had a pair of Rossi 9S OS's that I mounted FKS's on. Worked fine, the world did not end. Put another way, we may be overthinking this. Might be worth actually placing a Pivot on the heel to see how much of a misfit is there, and whether simply drilling an extra hole or two with some glue would be feasible. Personally, I'd bend over backwards to avoid using a PX heel, but that's me; YMMV. 

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

A few years back I had a pair of Rossi 9S OS's that I mounted FKS's on. Worked fine, the world did not end. Put another way, we may be overthinking this. Might be worth actually placing a Pivot on the heel to see how much of a misfit is there, and whether simply drilling an extra hole or two with some glue would be feasible. Personally, I'd bend over backwards to avoid using a PX heel, but that's me; YMMV. 

 

It must be just you.

 

The PX Racing is probably THE best bang for your buck performance binding out there. With careful shopping, you can pick up a PX14/PX15 Racing for under $150.

 

I have over a dozen pairs in service and another half dozen "in reserve" for future use.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

It must be just you.

 

The PX Racing is probably THE best bang for your buck performance binding out there. With careful shopping, you can pick up a PX14/PX15 Racing for under $150.

 

I have over a dozen pairs in service and another half dozen "in reserve" for future use.

Gotta agree with Rossi Smash here biggrin.gif

 

Wasn't the PX heel meant as the replacement for the Pivot heel initially and the Pivot was brought back by diehard demand?  My understanding is the PX heel has a little more lateral support and the same flex range as the Pivot with no pivot.

post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 
The box with my Dynastars just showed up at my office. It's been nearly 20 years since I purchased a new pair of skis. I'm very excited. My local shop, Heinos in NJ, is holding the PX 15s for me.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Gotta agree with Rossi Smash here biggrin.gif

 

Wasn't the PX heel meant as the replacement for the Pivot heel initially and the Pivot was brought back by diehard demand?  My understanding is the PX heel has a little more lateral support and the same flex range as the Pivot with no pivot.

Well, my recall is that the PX wasn't an "upgrade," but a marketing retreat to the basic upward release heels used by all the other companies. It was meant to satisfy the average recreational skier who found the Pivot too tricky to step into or retain, especially in soft snow, and lacking the satisfying "click" of positive engagement. (Its "thunk" never seemed to excite.) I also think the Pivot may have had issues about forward pressure for racers, although the FKS was sure used for a long time without a lot of complaint, so not dead sure. The bit about lateral support seems to get argued both ways, I've seen plenty of ads that extoll the Pivots' 7 contact points and so on. PX's do not have the same flex range, it's a bit less, although still exemplary, and more to the point, they're completely different biomechanically. The location of the Pivot release upward is better aligned with the tibia, in terms of mechanical stress prior to release, and the pivot in the Pivot actually permitted some lateral twist at the heel complementing toe release. They're universally regarded as a slightly more leg-friendly heel (or seriously more leg friendly if you read some of the crazed KB threads), whatever you do or don't think about the sounds they make or the snow that gets in the pivot plate. Rossi Smash may not see much diff in leg safety, everyone's got their own take, but some pay attention to small advantages or disadvantages. 

 

Phil doesn't like the PX because it's heavier than the Pivot, and because it has a significantly larger footprint, in terms of ski flex. He's on record about that. Seems like both parts are hard to dispute unless you have a scale or tape with a different outcome. 

 

And I'd guess they're the best bang for the buck because they don't have as much demand for the existing supply, eg, Econ 101. th_dunno-1[1].gif That often signals a product that just doesn't stand out relative to its competitors. Sometimes "diehard" just means "they did it better the first time around..."


Edited by beyond - 5/9/13 at 11:28pm
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Well, my recall is that the PX wasn't an "upgrade," but a marketing retreat to the basic upward release heels used by all the other companies. It was meant to satisfy the average recreational skier who found the Pivot too tricky to step into or retain, especially in soft snow, and lacking the satisfying "click" of positive engagement. (Its "thunk" never seemed to excite.) I also think the Pivot may have had issues about forward pressure for racers, although the FKS was sure used for a long time without a lot of complaint, so not dead sure. The bit about lateral support seems to get argued both ways, I've seen plenty of ads that extoll the Pivots' 7 contact points and so on. PX's do not have the same flex range, it's a bit less, although still exemplary, and more to the point, they're completely different biomechanically. The location of the Pivot release upward is better aligned with the tibia, in terms of mechanical stress prior to release, and the pivot in the Pivot actually permitted some lateral twist at the heel complementing toe release. They're universally regarded as a slightly more leg-friendly heel (or seriously more leg friendly if you read some of the crazed KB threads), whatever you do or don't think about the sounds they make or the snow that gets in the pivot plate. Rossi Smash may not see much diff in leg safety, everyone's got their own take, but some pay attention to small advantages or disadvantages. 

 

Phil doesn't like the PX because it's heavier than the Pivot, and because it has a significantly larger footprint, in terms of ski flex. He's on record about that. Seems like both parts are hard to dispute unless you have a scale or tape with a different outcome. 

 

And I'd guess they're the best bang for the buck because they don't have as much demand for the existing supply, eg, Econ 101. th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif That often signals a product that just doesn't stand out relative to its competitors. Sometimes "diehard" just means "they did it better the first time around..."

Well except for the fact that all their WC athletes ski on the PX Racing/Axial binding....

 

I like the Pivot/FKS too, it's just that they cost double (for no reason).

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Well, my recall is that the PX wasn't an "upgrade," but a marketing retreat to the basic upward release heels used by all the other companies. It was meant to satisfy the average recreational skier who found the Pivot too tricky to step into or retain, especially in soft snow, and lacking the satisfying "click" of positive engagement. (Its "thunk" never seemed to excite.) I also think the Pivot may have had issues about forward pressure for racers, although the FKS was sure used for a long time without a lot of complaint, so not dead sure. The bit about lateral support seems to get argued both ways, I've seen plenty of ads that extoll the Pivots' 7 contact points and so on. PX's do not have the same flex range, it's a bit less, although still exemplary, and more to the point, they're completely different biomechanically. The location of the Pivot release upward is better aligned with the tibia, in terms of mechanical stress prior to release, and the pivot in the Pivot actually permitted some lateral twist at the heel complementing toe release. They're universally regarded as a slightly more leg-friendly heel (or seriously more leg friendly if you read some of the crazed KB threads), whatever you do or don't think about the sounds they make or the snow that gets in the pivot plate. Rossi Smash may not see much diff in leg safety, everyone's got their own take, but some pay attention to small advantages or disadvantages. 

 

Phil doesn't like the PX because it's heavier than the Pivot, and because it has a significantly larger footprint, in terms of ski flex. He's on record about that. Seems like both parts are hard to dispute unless you have a scale or tape with a different outcome. 

 

And I'd guess they're the best bang for the buck because they don't have as much demand for the existing supply, eg, Econ 101. th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif That often signals a product that just doesn't stand out relative to its competitors. Sometimes "diehard" just means "they did it better the first time around..."

 

Beyond,  didn't mean upgrade just replacement.  Can't comment on the benefits for the Pivots, other than I've always considered a set over the years and never had the correct need/requirement at the time.

 

"diehard" can also mean oblivious to better and new ideas rolleyes.gif.

post #23 of 23

^^^^ It can also mean John McClane...biggrin.gif

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