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Does anybody remember...

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Does anybody else remember when K2 put an "unknown", "nobody" junior on a pair of the original K2 Fours at the 1996 junior nationals, and he won 3 events? I distinctly remember a bunch of K2 PR about it at the time, most of it emphasizing how their all-mountain ski had turned a zero into a hero.

 

Does anybody else remember who that racer was?

post #2 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post

Does anybody else remember when K2 put an "unknown", "nobody" junior on a pair of the original K2 Fours at the 1996 junior nationals, and he won 3 events? I distinctly remember a bunch of K2 PR about it at the time, most of it emphasizing how their all-mountain ski had turned a zero into a hero.

 

Does anybody else remember who that racer was?

 

nope nobody remembers, you are so smart, and know everything.

 

bode miller

 

^^^^^^^^^ highlight my whole post.

post #3 of 28

Yay, Josh is back! :)   And just in time for summer...
 

post #4 of 28
The fact that no one remembers doesn't Bode well.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

nope nobody remembers, you are so smart, and know everything.

 

bode miller

 

^^^^^^^^^ highlight my whole post.

 

I can remember all the state capitals, am I smart too ?

post #6 of 28
Yer lobbing softballs in a fast pitch league, pc. smile.gif.
post #7 of 28

I remember and without the hint.

post #8 of 28

Patrick, how about something like the only one eye'd skier* to ever podium (gold) in an Olympics?

 

 

* not missing one, but functionally blind in one eye. 

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Patrick, how about something like the only one eye'd skier* to ever podium (gold) in an Olympics?

 

 

* not missing one, but functionally blind in one eye. 

 

Wow, now THAT one is obscure. The closest I've come so far is Fausto Ridici, but he was merely a world cup winner (not Olympic).

 

This is an alpine skier, right?

 

Was the person permanently blind in one eye or was it a temporary situation, i.e. swollen shut from a previous crash or something like that?

post #10 of 28
No, permanent so far as I know. Old photo montages show him clearly moving his head side to side during turns to create parallax.


Oops... I outsmarted myself. Apologies, not an Olympic podium, but most certainly a SL gold in a regular WC SL... You got it right, it was Fausto. For some reason I switched him with Piero Gros. redface.gif. balk!
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

No, permanent so far as I know. Old photo montages show him clearly moving his head side to side during turns to create parallax.


Remember that photo in a old ski racing book I had. He was racing SL course.

post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

No, permanent so far as I know. Old photo montages show him clearly moving his head side to side during turns to create parallax.


Oops... I outsmarted myself. Apologies, not an Olympic podium, but most certainly a SL gold in a regular WC SL... You got it right, it was Fausto. For some reason I switched him with Piero Gros. redface.gif. balk!


Clever move picking one that doesn't come up in Google and whose internet bios don't mention the blindness. I had a distant recollection that he was Italian and sort of worked from there.

 

Gros and Ridici were close contemporaries as I'm sure you know.

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post


Remember that photo in a old ski racing book I had. He was racing SL course.

World Cup Ski Technique by Olle Larson & James Major if I recall correctly.

 

Does anyone remember who was the subject of 80% of the photos?

 

JF

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post


Clever move picking one that doesn't come up in Google and whose internet bios don't mention the blindness. I had a distant recollection that he was Italian and sort of worked from there.

Gros and Ridici were close contemporaries as I'm sure you know.

Yep. Also liked the tidbit that Piero kept his buddy Gustavo from winning WC overall #5

I think there were picts of Ridici in 'Pianta Su' as well. Olle Larson's book... If it wasn't Thoeni, it must have been Stenmark?
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

World Cup Ski Technique by Olle Larson & James Major if I recall correctly.

 

Does anyone remember who was the subject of 80% of the photos?

 

JF


Not having read that book, but guessing based on the era and the fact that the author has a Scandinavian name, I'll go with Stenmark.

 

I actually remember watching the 1989 Aspen World Cup GS (Stenmark's last win) live. I distinctly remember thinking that it was the end of an era...

post #16 of 28

It's fun to look back at some of the older greats like Stenmark and Killy, but the thing that brought the biggest smile to my face was the first US Alpine Olympic Gold Medal.  Not a hard question to answer.  What an exciting skier he was to watch back then.

post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

It's fun to look back at some of the older greats like Stenmark and Killy, but the thing that brought the biggest smile to my face was the first US Alpine Olympic Gold Medal.  Not a hard question to answer.  What an exciting skier he was to watch back then.

 

EDIT: I'm going to guess that you mean the first *men's* gold medal. Is that correct, or does the book really feature Andrea Mead Lawrence? Also the DH was run before the GS and SL in 84, but I'm guessing you're not referring here to the idiot savant of gliding (emphasis on "idiot").

 

SECOND EDIT: I just realized that the above could be interpreted as a reference to Johnson's post-comeback condition. It is not - It's a reference to the attitude that led him to steal cars and attempt said comeback in the first place. Klammer described him perfectly...


Hmm, interesting given that Larsson's book was from 1978 and PM didn't really hit his stride for a couple years after that. Then again Larsson was coaching in Canada by that point and the two teams co-trained a fair bit in that era.

 

I've always wondered what would have happened if the IOC had allowed Stenmark to defend his medals. I (sentimentally) think that the gold would have gone to the same person, but Stenmark was still an incredible force in SL and GS at that point.


Edited by patrickjchase - 5/7/13 at 12:39pm
post #18 of 28

I have watched this run many times over the years, he hadn't won a race in quite some time.  It wasn't the end of an era, it was the beginning of the next!  I think Tomba was 4th in this race.  Anyway, if you watch how Stenmark slithers through the gates in the flats, you can see how the next stage of technique is beginning to emerge.  Racers like Aamodt & Tomba would take it to another level in the 90's!

 

 

JF

post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

I have watched this run many times over the years, he hadn't won a race in quite some time.  It wasn't the end of an era, it was the beginning of the next!  I think Tomba was 4th in this race.  Anyway, if you watch how Stenmark slithers through the gates in the flats, you can see how the next stage of technique is beginning to emerge.  Racers like Aamodt & Tomba would take it to another level in the 90's!

 

JF

 

Hmm... Tomba had burst onto the scene with his technique more or less "fully formed" in the 87-88 season (he was a lot like Bode that way). Tomba had 3GS and 6SL wins that year, as well as the Olympic GS+SL double and a questionable proposition for Katerina Witt. With that in mind I'd argue that what you see here is Stenmark incorporating aspects of Tomba's technique after the fact as opposed to pioneering them.

 

EDIT: I suspect that Tomba's emergence was also the reason Stenmark hadn't won in the 87-88 season (the dry spell you reference above). It's hard to overstate the degree to which Tomba dominated the tech events that year and forced everybody else to change their approach, and that took some time.

 

Fortunately for everybody else Tomba enjoyed life in the fast lane a bit too much and his results suffered during the 88-89 and 89-90 seasons.

post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

Since we're on the topic of famous last-ish wins...

 

Anybody else remember Tomba's gold-medal GS performance at the 1996 World Champs in Sierra Nevada, Spain? I actually woke up in the middle of the night to watch that. I couldn't believe he was able to recover from that hip-check and still win. Unfortunately I can't find video of the event and my own archives don't go that far back (unless it's on the "1996 World Cup Winning Runs" VHS tape that I have squirrelled away somewhere. Of course then I'd have to find a VCR).

post #21 of 28
Does anyone remember who was the first to wear a helmet for GS & why?
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

I mentioned this in another thread, but since we're sort of on the topic of classic GS runs, here's one of my all-time favorites:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgjRxt_Feg4

 

This could never happen again with modern snowmaking and course prep of course.

post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post

 

This could never happen again with modern snowmaking and course prep of course.

 

I should clarify: Adelboden is always a bit on the bumpy side (just ask Daron Rahlves), and that's one of the things that makes it a classic WC GS. What made 96 unique was the degree to which the terrain features were exposed and the finesse with which Von Gruenigen skied them. There are a couple point in that second run where he makes an honest-to-goodness mogul "scoot", i.e. sets his tails to jet from the front of one roller to the back of the next. You expect to see those sorts of moves in DH, not so much in a turny GS.

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post

I mentioned this in another thread, but since we're sort of on the topic of classic GS runs, here's one of my all-time favorites:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgjRxt_Feg4

 

This could never happen again with modern snowmaking and course prep of course.

 

 

   Awesome!

 

    zenny

post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 

One of my favorite memories from that era was when some idiot reporter asked Ingemar Stenmark (then retired) how he felt about people comparing von Gruenigen to him. Stenmark's reply was something along the lines of "I'm honored to be compared to Michael von Gruenigen". That was of course somewhat overstated (Stenmark won twice as many races in GS alone) but it indicates the depth of respect that other racers held for von Gruenigen at his peak.

 

Back then if a non-racer asked me for an example of good GS technique I'd show them either Von Gruenigen or his compatriot Sonja Nef. There were others who were as fast (Kjus, Kalin) but none as clean.

post #26 of 28
For what it is worth Gretchen Fraser won the first gold in 1948.
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norefjell View Post

For what it is worth Gretchen Fraser won the first gold in 1948.


Ah crud, you're right.

 

I assume it was Phil Mahre in the Larsson/Major book right? Both Fraser and Mead-Lawrence would have been quite dated by then, and Bill Johnson was still boosting cars back in '78 (plus you really wouldn't want to use him as an example of anything but gliding).

post #28 of 28

I skied with Fausto once at Madesimo, must've been about two years before he died. 

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