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What's the narrowest ski in your quiver? - Page 2

Poll Results: What's the narrowest ski in your quiver?

 
  • 60% (42)
    80 mm. or less
  • 5% (4)
    81-85 mm.
  • 15% (11)
    86-90 mm.
  • 4% (3)
    91-95 mm.
  • 5% (4)
    96-100 mm.
  • 2% (2)
    101-105 mm.
  • 4% (3)
    106-110 mm.
  • 1% (1)
    111-120 mm.
  • 0% (0)
    121-125 mm.
  • 0% (0)
    126-130 mm.
  • 0% (0)
    >130 mm.
70 Total Votes  
post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Two things to keep in mind. 

1) to pull more Gs without the ski sliding up out of the groove it's carving you have to tip the ski more.

2) Tipping the ski more dials up a tighter turn, and an even tighter turn with a smaller radius ski.

The longer radius GS ski can hold the line at speed to pull a high g-turn when tipped to or beyond the needed critical angle.  Tipping a SL ski to the angle needed to hold that  high G GS turn, will have it dial up a SL turn that it can't hold.


This is 100% right, though I've pretty much given up on trying to explain this particular concept.

 

Basically if the pressure angle (angle from the center of mass to the ski edge) is higher than the edge angle, then the ski is inherently unstable at that edge angle and speed. It will either high-center you or skid out of the turn.

 

If a ski is unstable at all "feasible" edge angles (i.e. all edge angles that you have the technique and strength to achieve) then that means you've exceeded your speed limit on that ski. The interesting thing here is that a stronger skier can typically make stable turns on a given ski up to a higher speed than a weaker skier.

post #32 of 38

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post


This is 100% right, though I've pretty much given up on trying to explain this particular concept.

 

Basically if the pressure angle (angle from the center of mass to the ski edge) is higher than the edge angle, then the ski is inherently unstable at that edge angle and speed. It will either high-center you or skid out of the turn.

 

Don't give up just yet~that's solid concept imo. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickjchase View Post

 

If a ski is unstable at all "feasible" edge angles (i.e. all edge angles that you have the technique and strength to achieve) then that means you've exceeded your speed limit on that ski. The interesting thing here is that a stronger skier can typically make stable turns on a given ski up to a higher speed than a weaker skier.

 

Yep the strong ones can let the skis dig into snow more. Another funny thing is that you don't have to be as strong if you are fat enough lol~

post #33 of 38

After doing all the work up to >130mm it wouldn't have hurt much to include 61-70mm, and 71-80mm.

 

66mm Head Supershapes for mine.  Giddyup!

post #34 of 38
line prophet 98!
post #35 of 38

I own the older model Stockli Laser SC at 63mm.  It is much easier to carve skinnier skis on frozen-over morning spring snow or when it hasn't snowed in weeks. 

post #36 of 38

IIRC both of my race skis are 68 underfoot. 

 

IMHO this poll should have had a 70-80 mm category and then an under 70 category.  Still plenty of skis that are under 70mm underfoot.  Yes they are mostly race skis, but that gets lost in your poll when combined with all under 80mm recreational skis that are available.

 

Rick G

post #37 of 38

I could just try a pair of ice skates (maybe speed skates instead of hockey) and see how they hold LOL.  VERY thin, high edge angles.....gets the job done nicely wink.gif

post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

I could just try a pair of ice skates (maybe speed skates instead of hockey) and see how they hold LOL.  VERY thin, high edge angles.....gets the job done nicely wink.gif

 

That sort of thinking is precisely why the FIS enforces a stack-height limit (no more than 50 mm from snow to boot sole, no more than 43 mm from boot sole to heel).

 

The net effect of both limits plus normal ramp angles is to keep the forefoot within about 3" of the snow. World Cup level turns require very high edge angles due to high lateral accelerations, so the bottom line is that you'd boot out in a hurry if you ever tried to race on an ice skate that complied with the FIS limits smile.gif.

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