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Big Boy noobie all mountain skis?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

First time posting!  Nice forum ya'll have here.

 

Anyways, I am looking to buy my first set of skis, and have been a bit overwhelmed with all the different brands, styles, rockers, bindings, etc etc., so I was hoping to get a little guidance on the matter!  I went ahead and copped some Atomic Hawx-80's size 28.5, if that makes a difference.

 

 

Where in the world are you skiing? 

  • I live in Boulder, CO and will most likely grab a Epic Local Pass this season

 

What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)

  • I am looking for an all mountain ski that i can continue to learn on groomed runs with, but have the option to go backside with some buddies if the opportunity presents itself.  I'd also like to keep the price down a bit  (<$400 w/ bindings) so i can beat them up for a couple seasons before getting something a little more advanced once i have progressed more.

 

How many days a year do you ski?

  • As much as I can get away with... maybe 3-5 times a month

 

How advanced are you as a skier?

  • Beginner-Intermediate

 

What's your height and weight? 

  • 6'3" 250lbs

 

I'm a total noob on the subject, so any help you wonderful forum goers can offer would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks,

-John

post #2 of 8

No real advice on specific skis, but here is some general advice for new skiers looking to get gear.

 

First, the skis you get, are the least important of all your ski gear when it comes to determing how much fun you will have on a given day.  This may sound crazy, but its true.  That is not to say which skis you get is irrelevant, but rather, you can buy a pair of used skis, that are a year or two old, and they will do the job you need them to just as well as a brand new pair....this wont always be true...but trust me, you wont notice the difference between new skis and second hand skis until you are at least "advanced".  You can buy some great second hand skis with bindings easily for $100-150.

 

Where to buy used skis?  "Ski Swaps" in the fall are likley the best, as you will get a massive selection, help from volunteers working the swap, and great prices.

 

What to do with the money you saved?  Invest it where it counts: on things that you will notice improve your time on the hill:

 

  1. Get good ski clothes - you dont need to be an expert to appreciate warm dry and comfortable - this includes, socks, gloves, goggles, under and over gear
  2. Invest in boots that fit.  I know you got some, but you might still need to invest in some fitting - it is very worth it - skiing is no fun if your feet hurt, or your boots feel sloppy on your foot.
  3. Lessons - they work - request a certified pro - Level 2 or higher.

Edited by Skidude72 - 5/2/13 at 3:32am
post #3 of 8

Check out Gear Trade...They have great stuff for great prices...And if you ask me, if you're not skiing groomers 100% of the time then get a ski with rocker. You will have way more fun and will have an easier time learning. 

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses!  

 

SkiDude72: I already got some decent gear last season (boots/gloves/goggles/pants/jacket/socks), so I am pretty set on that stuff.  Good fitting ski boots made a HUGE difference!

 

As for buying skis, I think the main question I have is should I get a wider ski due to my size, even though i am pretty inexperienced?  I've heard skinnier and shorter skis are easy to learn on, but wider/longer skis are better for bigger/taller people.  Is this true?  I was thinking about getting a 175 ski around 80-90 waist width (I am 6'3" 250 lbs). Should I be going longer/wider than that? 

 

Mattias E:  Checking out Gear Trade now, Thanks!

 

-John

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGrizzly View Post

Thanks for the responses!  

SkiDude72: I already got some decent gear last season (boots/gloves/goggles/pants/jacket/socks), so I am pretty set on that stuff.  Good fitting ski boots made a HUGE difference!

As for buying skis, I think the main question I have is should I get a wider ski due to my size, even though i am pretty inexperienced?  I've heard skinnier and shorter skis are easy to learn on, but wider/longer skis are better for bigger/taller people.  Is this true?  I was thinking about getting a 175 ski around 80-90 waist width (I am 6'3" 250 lbs). Should I be going longer/wider than that? 

Mattias E:  Checking out Gear Trade now, Thanks!

-John

I'd say go around 100mm. What kind of skiing will you be doing?
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Mostly front side, but will likely do a a few tree/powder trips next season

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGrizzly View Post

Mostly front side, but will likely do a a few tree/powder trips next season

I'd say go 100 or even 105 with rocker. I am a firm believer that fatter rockered skis are more fun and handle better in almost all conditions.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGrizzly View Post

Thanks for the responses!  

 

SkiDude72: I already got some decent gear last season (boots/gloves/goggles/pants/jacket/socks), so I am pretty set on that stuff.  Good fitting ski boots made a HUGE difference!

 

As for buying skis, I think the main question I have is should I get a wider ski due to my size, even though i am pretty inexperienced?  I've heard skinnier and shorter skis are easy to learn on, but wider/longer skis are better for bigger/taller people.  Is this true?  I was thinking about getting a 175 ski around 80-90 waist width (I am 6'3" 250 lbs). Should I be going longer/wider than that? 

 

Mattias E:  Checking out Gear Trade now, Thanks!

 

-John

 

 

Skinnier skis are easier to learn to "carve" on.  Wider skis are more stable (less side cut) as they dont "hook up" like skinny skis (well not skinny race skis anyway).  Wider skis do take a toll on your knees if used on hardpack all the time (you'll notice the differrence if you ski a few days in a row for sure..sooner if you have bad knees).
 
Fat skis were orginally marketed to heli and cat operators for their rental fleets to give to their low end intermediate clients.  So fatties started life as targeted for less experienced skiers.
 
My rec would be:
 
Somthing in the 80 -90 range seems reasonable given where you want to ski...I wouldnt go over say 95 underfoot.
Early rise will help, with conventional camber underfoot
Longitudintally Stiff - you're a big guy, so the stiffness will help you
Length 175-180cm

Edited by Skidude72 - 5/2/13 at 8:07pm
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