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Another story of Chaos from Everest

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I originally bumped Everest Increasing Climbers= Increasing Danger,  from last year but this new story has its own craziness attached to it. 

 

Sherpas attack European Climbers 

http://www.outsideonline.com/news-from-the-field/Fight-Breaks-Out-on-Everest.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebookpost

 

 

Quote:
fight between a group of Sherpas and the alpine team of Simone Moro, Ueli Steck, and Jonathan Griffith took place near Camp III and at Camp II on Mount Everest this weekend. Initial reports about the kicking, punching, rock-throwing skirmish have come from Moro's Web site and articles filed by European news outlets.

Edited by Trekchick - 4/30/13 at 10:29am
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

More articles out about this latest skirmish

http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=40824

 

 

Clip from the Q & A

Quote:
I think all have understood this by now. It must have been shocking…  something really dramatic 
Ueli’s mouth bled due to having received a punch and having been hit by a stone, I was kicked and punched and slapped for a long time, we risked being stoned to death at Camp 2.
post #3 of 7

For a second, I thought the title implied our very own Chaos was skiing Mount Everest.

 

Of course, that would be right up his alley.  He probably does it once a month, actually.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

The reality is, you need to have some kind of balls to do this, yet there is no place for ego when you're answering to the forces of nature. 

Here's another account from the eyes of a sherpa

http://www.melissaarnot.com/going-forward/

 

 

 

Quote:

GOING FORWARD

I cannot recount the events of this past week on Everest, nor do I want to. I understand that people want to hear the story and know the details, but, honestly, the details are sad and they are in the past. They cannot be changed. Everyone will have their version of what happened and why it happened. I, too, have my own version. I came here to climb Mt. Everest. I came here for the challenge, adventure and type of friendship that has become a mark of this place for me. On this expedition, I have had some of the best times of my life, laughing into the late hours with friends who were supporting each other’s goals. I have had some of the worst times — standing in front of those same friends to protect them from unexplainable violence and anger.  Something shifted the balance for a moment. My only hope is that it shifts back quickly, and everyone can resume their jobs, their passion and their goal of climbing. I am resting now, both my body and my mind, in hopes that I can resume the reason I came here. I am thankful for the good moments that have occurred this year. I am sad for the events of the last week. I am hopeful that the adventure ahead will be one of collaboration, support and rebuilding the relationship of trust between everyone who has chosen to be here.

post #5 of 7

I am not a fan of wealthy tourists who are not mountaineers paying large sums of money to be lead (sometimes to their death) to the top of Everest.

 

As far as the Sherpa violence, I wonder if on a subconscious level perhaps they resent the presence of the true mountaineers because it reminds them of a purer mountain experience in the past when there were no tourists on the mountain and no gong show.

 

My guess is that most Sherpas welcome the money that they make from the tourists but what is not so great is that some wealthy A type personalities don't always listen to or respect the hired help. So the Sherpas pay a price so to speak for the tourist dollars and part of that price is overcrowding on the mountain.

post #6 of 7
I would not read too much into the story. Someone snapped. Being at 7200m made it way worse. I can't imagine they didn't know who those climbers were, they are über celebrities in that world. I can't imagine the westerners being as delicate and considerate as they paint it to be, but I doubt they were creating a hazard either, as they just know better. Ugly situation.

It's interesting how the Sherpas and guides view the true "sport" parties, ie those who are not paid and are not paying. Are they getting in the way? Are they respected for what they do?
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

The reality is, you need to have some kind of balls to do this, yet there is no place for ego when you're answering to the forces of nature. 

Here's another account from the eyes of a sherpa

http://www.melissaarnot.com/going-forward/

 

Melisa is a climber not a sherpa. 

 

Did something got deleted? 

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