EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Reflection time for those that were going for CSIA level 3s, exams or course
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Reflection time for those that were going for CSIA level 3s, exams or course

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

It's the end of another season.  Time to reflect on what we have achieved and if we met our goals.  I set a lofty goal of getting my 3s this year but in the end decided not to sit the exam.  The main reason was I knew I was borderline and if the conditions were perfect I'd probably just scrap through but I will go for it when even in the worst conditions I can scrap through.  

 

I set out to improve my skiing and knowledge and I think I definitely have a much better understanding of methodology.  My eye has improved and I'm starting to get better at analysing skiers but it's still a work in progress.  In terms of my ski improvement, I feel I'm a much stronger skier than at the start of the season with better lateral control.  It's really interesting though when I reviewed my feedback from L1, L2 and L3 that I still have similar problems and the suggested solutions are very similar which goes to show how difficult it is to change and REFINE skills, and how what we are working on in our skiing is probably what we were working on years ago.  

 

I'm starting to understand the 'advanced competencies' and how they are used to assess more skilled skiers and trying to apply them to my own skiing.

 

I had 6 friends go for exams and 2 passed, one went for it 3 times before finally passing.  

 

I would love to hear about other people's year and what they have achieved, worked on, new insights etc.  Whether they went for exams, if they passed or just missed out and feedback to why they didn't?

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthski View Post

It's the end of another season.  Time to reflect on what we have achieved and if we met our goals.  I set a lofty goal of getting my 3s this year but in the end decided not to sit the exam.  The main reason was I knew I was borderline and if the conditions were perfect I'd probably just scrap through but I will go for it when even in the worst conditions I can scrap through.  

 

I set out to improve my skiing and knowledge and I think I definitely have a much better understanding of methodology.  My eye has improved and I'm starting to get better at analysing skiers but it's still a work in progress.  In terms of my ski improvement, I feel I'm a much stronger skier than at the start of the season with better lateral control.  It's really interesting though when I reviewed my feedback from L1, L2 and L3 that I still have similar problems and the suggested solutions are very similar which goes to show how difficult it is to change and REFINE skills, and how what we are working on in our skiing is probably what we were working on years ago.  

 

I'm starting to understand the 'advanced competencies' and how they are used to assess more skilled skiers and trying to apply them to my own skiing.

 

I had 6 friends go for exams and 2 passed, one went for it 3 times before finally passing.  

 

I would love to hear about other people's year and what they have achieved, worked on, new insights etc.  Whether they went for exams, if they passed or just missed out and feedback to why they didn't?

 

The blue portion rings so true.

post #3 of 8

This year I was hoping to pass the level 3, having worked my ass off the past two years with frequent coaching. I took the CSCF-2 in preparation to improve my carving, expecting that to translate to AP improvement. I did pass the freeski portion of the CSCF-2. The level 4s and 3s have given me mixed feedback, with a few saying I'm skiing to standard, and others saying not to. So for me, it's only a good time to take the exam when the examiners are all saying "yes" (since otherwise they're going to grade you "no"). The feedback from the conductors was actually very helpful, and I've been trying to work it into my skiing. Maybe next year will be the year. I dunno. 

 

Good on you for not going in thinking you might scrape by. They had 5 examiners this round at Whistler, so if you're borderline on IP or bumps, probably one of the five would have failed you. No new level 3s out of this round at all despite more than 20 candidates attending the ski portion, with more attending the teach portion. Only two candidates passed the ski portion. I really think having 5 examiners is an unfair experience for candidates. You really need to be getting 7s, not 6s, to pass when they do that, since invariably one of the examiners in the group will grade down. 

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

This year I was hoping to pass the level 3, having worked my ass off the past two years with frequent coaching. I took the CSCF-2 in preparation to improve my carving, expecting that to translate to AP improvement. I did pass the freeski portion of the CSCF-2. The level 4s and 3s have given me mixed feedback, with a few saying I'm skiing to standard, and others saying not to. So for me, it's only a good time to take the exam when the examiners are all saying "yes" (since otherwise they're going to grade you "no"). The feedback from the conductors was actually very helpful, and I've been trying to work it into my skiing. Maybe next year will be the year. I dunno. 

 

Good on you for not going in thinking you might scrape by. They had 5 examiners this round at Whistler, so if you're borderline on IP or bumps, probably one of the five would have failed you. No new level 3s out of this round at all despite more than 20 candidates attending the ski portion, with more attending the teach portion. Only two candidates passed the ski portion. I really think having 5 examiners is an unfair experience for candidates. You really need to be getting 7s, not 6s, to pass when they do that, since invariably one of the examiners in the group will grade down. 

 

Well the flip side is, while some might mark down, some will mark up.  More examiners at more courses, provides a more fair and consistent standard.

post #5 of 8

I was one of the 20 out of 22 that didn't pass yesterday!  Tough, but hey it makes me respect the standard even more.  Conditions were pretty much perfect -- bluebird skies and very nicely groomed hardpack on Springboard for the short, medium and long turns, and not-so-hard baby bumps on lower Stoker for the bumps.  So no excuses!!!

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomstriker View Post

I was one of the 20 out of 22 that didn't pass yesterday!  Tough, but hey it makes me respect the standard even more.  Conditions were pretty much perfect -- bluebird skies and very nicely groomed hardpack on Springboard for the short, medium and long turns, and not-so-hard baby bumps on lower Stoker for the bumps.  So no excuses!!!

Good on you for having a go. You are closer than you were than before for trying it. What was your main feedback for your ski? What did you get to teach and how did you approach it?
post #7 of 8

Background: I'm in my late 30s, got my Level 2 in 2008, I teach on weekends at Grouse Mtn and sit at a desk banging on a keyboard during the week.  My fitness isn't great, as I'm quite physically inactive in the summer and don't do much pre-season prep.

 

I took the L3 Course in March 2012 @ Grouse.

 

 

1st exam attempt - April 2012 @ Grouse - double fail

  • Can't remember the ski feedback offhand.
  • Teach feedback: good communication style and class management (it had better be, I have 10+ years of teaching experience), but teaching at too basic a level...i.e. only addressing the symptoms per L1 or L2 instruction, rather than relating it back to fundamental causes with a proper explanation of the underlying biomechanics.

 

2nd exam attempt - April 6/7, 2013 @ Grouse

  • Rocked the teaching big time!!!  Whoohoo!!!!
  • Ski feedback: main problem was insufficient angulation & edging -- wasn't rolling my ankles, especially the inside leg (A-framing).  Subsequent analysis by examiners (I know them really well) and ski-school colleagues found the cause to be subtle S&B errors (too far forward, too far inside) and of course being impatient in Phase 2 (gotta learn to love the fall-line).  I also have some upper-body involvement, i.e. insufficient separation.  And I still have a very slight tendency to stem, which goes all the way back to how I learned as a kid in the '80s!!!

 

3rd exam attempt - April 30, 2013 @ Whistler - ski retest

Scored 5.x on everything.  All criteria were marked "NI".  Whistler isn't my home mountain, so I don't know the examiners...won't have much of a chance to follow up with them about specific feedback.  Luckily I had a colleague shoot video of one of my runs, and in my own estimation I have improved a lot in the 3 weeks since the last exam, just not enough.  At the end of the day, I just can't extract the level of performance out of the ski as is required by the L3 standard...i.e. bend it, arc it, carve it, deflect it.

 

There's always next year! smile.gif

post #8 of 8

Had a great year. Wrapped up my PSIA 3 exactly 30 yrs after getting my CSIA 3.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Reflection time for those that were going for CSIA level 3s, exams or course