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Are demo bindings as good as normal bindings?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm considering buying a slightly used demo pair of powder skis, they come with Rossi Axium 120 Pro demo bindings.  

 

How do these compare to the Axium 120XL bindings, and in particular are demo bindings worse in any way than fixed bindings in terms of slop, etc?

post #2 of 13

demo bindings have more moving parts than a 'conventional' binding, this means slightly more weight and a greater chance of developing some (or a significant amount) of slop. Most of that slop usually is negligible once a ski boot is clicked in, but I dislike it. Forward pressure settings are also often more rudimentary, with a hand grenade-like 'close enough is good enough' adjustment. There can be some upside to demo bindings also, you can play around with positioning (often, not always) and you can loan them out, if you want to do that.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks whiteroom.  I ordered the skis, can you take a look at this thread I just started and chime in on that question please?

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/120224/rossi-120-demo-bindings-toe-and-heel-both-adjust-or-only-heel-use-for-changing-center-point

post #4 of 13

I'm not fond of the extra stack height that comes with demo bindings.  I like my boots close to the ski.

 

 

 

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How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #5 of 13
What's the difference between demo binding and quick adjustable rail binding like Head power rail? I see more and more of the latter style in retail shop lately.
post #6 of 13
Conventional wisdom says demo bindings always weight more, but that may not always be true. I think the Schizo demo weighs the same or less, and uses only one more screw per binding for adjustment.
post #7 of 13

After 35 years on normal bindings I bought a pair of skis this season with Tyrolia demo bindings, couldn't be happier, can't tell the difference.  Other than I didn't have to spend extra time choosing and mounting bindings.

post #8 of 13

^^^^ AFAIK, Tyrolia/Head demos are same as regular TRP system, slightly different graphics. They've been doing fully adjustable bindings for years, heard that they just wanted to simplify/consolidate. 

post #9 of 13

I wouldn't be too worried about using a demo binding under "normal" use.

 

I define normal use as 10 DIN or below, no cliff hucking or skiing where the binding needs to absorb huge hits, and also not being used for racing or other competition where things like weight and stack height come into play.

 

My wife and I scour demo fleets like vultures and have owned several skis with all kind of demos.  We've never had a use problem with any of them.

 

As other have mentioned, there are downsides. They can be significantly heavier than other standard binding options.  They will have some additional slop from the get-go and as they age the slop can be expected to get worse. They have more parts that can fail, which is why I would be hesitant to be doing high impact skiing on a demo binding.

 

But they have lots of benefits too, like being able to loan a pair of skis to a friend and being able to move the mount position forward and back without a remount.

 

I think MOST people skiing recreationally won't have any performance issued skiing a demo binding, and whether or not to use them is a personal choice.

 

My wife just purchased a demo pair of S7W, and this is the first ski that we had the shop keep the bindings and mount our own- the S7's were much longer than my wife's previous ski, and she was concerned about weight, so we had them take off the demo bindings to get the weight more in line with her previous ski (that was also ex-demo). But, if we didn't have a free pair of bindings around, we would have bought the ski with the demos and not worried about it.

post #10 of 13

It's important to remember that demo bindings, like everything else, have improved over the years. I have an older set of Pocket Rockets with Salomon demo bindings. I don't like the set-up that much because the bindings feel loose and add a lot of vertical height to the overall package, which affects the handling, and not in a good way. On the other hand, I have a set of 2010 Elan 888's with Tyrolia SP demo bindings. It's a much better set-up as the bindings feel secure, have a low profile, and don't seem to take anything away from the performance of the ski. In fact, I was so impressed by the new design of the Tyrolia bindings on a set of Elan Amphibio's I demoed this past season that I almost bought the skis just for the bindings! 

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I wouldn't be too worried about using a demo binding under "normal" use.

 

I define normal use as 10 DIN or below, no cliff hucking or skiing where the binding needs to absorb huge hits, and also not being used for racing or other competition where things like weight and stack height come into play.

 

My wife and I scour demo fleets like vultures and have owned several skis with all kind of demos.  We've never had a use problem with any of them.

 

That.  Unless they were unusually abused, demo bindings will hold your boots on and release during a crash just fine (up to their rated DIN settings).  I have no reservations about buying skis with demo/adjustable bindings.  I do prefer to have all used bindings I buy release tested, especially if they were shipped a long way, but 99% of the time both demo and 'normal' bindings are going to be fine.

 

The drawbacks are:

 

  • (usually) more weight -- you may notice this on lightweight skis, or when carrying them around (especially uphill).  On heavy skis with metal you'll never notice it while skiing.
  • (usually) a higher stand height -- this has pluses and minuses, but is probably not what you want for powder/bumps.
  • (maybe) more 'slop' -- see Whiteroom's reply (post #2) for more details.  'Normal' bindings are not immune to mechanical wear and tear either, though they TEND to be simpler in design and have fewer parts that can break or loosen.  This may be a factor for park+pipe, 'hucking', etc. where you anticipate pounding the bindings frequently during landings.

 

On the plus side you can play around with boot positions and people can borrow your skis.

 

I'd say it's a wash on resale value.  The future buyer won't have to pay for a remount, but also may deduct some value for them being 'demo' bindings.

post #12 of 13

I think the advantages of cost and flexibility make any adjustable binding an advantage for the average used ski buyer.If you like paying $500 to $1,000 for the latest and greatest and still not be able to pass them down to your kids or friends then feel free to buy new with fixed length bindings.I buy new at times but even then I buy system bindings I can adjust.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

I think the advantages of cost and flexibility make any adjustable binding an advantage for the average used ski buyer.If you like paying $500 to $1,000 for the latest and greatest and still not be able to pass them down to your kids or friends then feel free to buy new with fixed length bindings.I buy new at times but even then I buy system bindings I can adjust.

Good point. Just found out that the skis I'd lent to my kid for the season had to be re drilled last fall. Hadn't realized that. So now they have THREE sets of holes, one of which will have to be excavated this fall when I repo the boards. It all gets old after a while.
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