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Steepest Ski Resorts in the World - Page 7

post #181 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by whippersnapper View Post
 


Trying to find a decent pic of Heaven's Eleven.  It's so narrow, typically 5-6 feet wide, it looks like a razor cut in the face, hardly any snow is visible.  It's the last photo in this group.  Don't forget to turn left before the cliff.

 

http://unofficialnetworks.com/2011/10/tellurides-chair-14-gold-hill-express

Little Wasatch Face's Heaven's Eleven Couloir - Photo: Chason Russell

Little Wasatch Face's Heaven's Eleven Couloir - Photo: Chason Russell

 

I'm really tired of people posting up straightline shots and acting like they are a big deal. All you have to do there is point them and have the guts to hold on.  What part requires the skill?

post #182 of 198

^^ You forgot the ;)

post #183 of 198

You should see me bending perfect arcs in there on my SG's...  

 

 

:) )

   \ \               

post #184 of 198

The old Alta refrains burned in my memory by Tom Cadora,
( which was reprised starkly in my head at L'Espace Killy two weeks ago ) come to mind

  • "Smear to Steer" !
  • "Slow down at the top of the turn" !
  • "Elevate to get the skis out of the fall line, quick" ! 

And I almost forgot, an Austrian taught us in Lech-Zurs "Up and Forward" , and our man in L'Espace Killy's only advice for the old dark Americaine was "Hup et Forwaard"..


Edited by dustyfog - 4/23/15 at 9:54am
post #185 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Wuss. A 95% pitch is where you really separate the men from the boys.

A 95° slope is too obtuse for me. ;)  (Am I correct to understand that 47* is the same as 47° ?  If yes then one can use  alt-248 shortcut)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post
 

 

If you don't need a parachute once you drop in, it's not "real" skiing.  cool.gif  

I am happy to never do any "real" skiing.  Parachutes are too chaffing.  ;)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post
 

Does anybody honestly believe that there is a North American resort that falls into the TOP 25 STEEPEST based upon OPs criteria???  Me thinks not.  I know OP is rather biased towards Alta but give me a break.  I'm also rather biased towards Taos, my home mountain, which I think is considerably steeper than Alta.  But under no circumstances would I rank it among the top 25. 

 

That being said, threads like this are just silly.  I doubt the vast majority of people on this site have even been to 25 different resorts...I don't think I have and I've been skiing for 20+ years.  Furthermore, I doubt most people on this site have even skied outside of North America.  I agree with whoever suggested discussing something a tad more subjective...Funnest Resorts sounds a lot more fun.

 

Do you mean "Funny" as in "Ha Ha funny" or funny as in "strange funny"? ;)

 

I am actually happy to be able to ski down a trail (piste) in one piece without breaking any equipment or bones. :D

 

The video of the tunnel skiing was amazing. :cool  It was even more amazing when I saw the pdf trailmap and had a better sense of the terrain.

post #186 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyPilgrim View Post

 

I am happy to never do any "real" skiing.  Parachutes are too chaffing.  ;)

 

Um, actually ski flying is a real thing and I have seen some of the fellas with their micro sized paraglider packs headed out to the Bear Creek backcountry.  I grilled one guy on the lift and he was insistent that this wee group of ski flyers desired no publicity whatsoever.

 

Shhhh

post #187 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whippersnapper View Post
 


Hey dustyfog.  Oh, that's so funny:

 

"...'Follow me Dad' is a threat..."

 

Nice!

 

JayT answered you on Heaven's Eleven.  That is the scariest-looking line I've ever seen.  Kim Havell made the first female descent described in a TGR thread below, but the pics and video are gone, I can't find a good video...Kim's POV was scary as shit.  The whole route is a crux, her ski tips and tails were catching, releasing...just inches of traverse at best. (Damn TGR's elimination of their best photography!):

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/227670-TR-Telluride-s-Heavens-Eleven-3

 

Cheers 

Found this on YouTube: This is up there with anything anywhere in the world, had no idea Telluride backcountry had this in store for the intrepid, and here there are 4 of them...

 

Glad to watch from the comfort of a MacBook screen! Our most recent trip to L'Espace Killy hit my Outer Limits without question, and this is Outer Space :eek from this person's perspective-matches anything anywhere, Alps, US, Canada...talk about narrow, steep, and just pure adrenaline. Definitely very high consequence couloir...

 

This was another couloir in the same general area I presume, some of you may have skied these two for all I know..put your hands up, guilty parties, salud!

 

 

Heaven's 11 looks just crazy.

Disappointing vid, does not show exit. Snow looked pretty good though. Talking about waiting for good snow. Wow, if that's firm there's no way without ropes. From the still, you turn left then traverse above the cliff? For how long.

 

Second vid, the Oakley ad, ruined what could be good. A gopro pole shot showing the goggles? Poor.

 

The Euros were born crazy with this stuff. I remember seeing lines through the rocks in 1980 at Tignes which were beyond belief.  There were very few over here doing that stuff back then.  You had to go see a film in a theater to see Patrick Vallencant, Sylvain Saudan and people like that. Really more like ski mountaineering.

 

 

I mean this vid I guess is just average for a lot of those guys. Green slopes of extreme.

 

Chamonix, Aiguille du Midi North Face:

 

https://youtu.be/bipxH48EIUk

 

 

 

Patrick Vallencant and his pedal hop turn for super steeps in slo mo.

This is steep! And with a large pack on. It says 55 deg but looks more.

 

https://youtu.be/2soYD8LX7YI

Pedal Hop Turn article from 1980 Ski Mag.

 

I think that may be from this film in Peru skiing Yerupaja, over 6,600m and more like 65deg.

 

https://youtu.be/u_kqQNT6ZQg

post #188 of 198

If you are looking for San Juan Couloirs (and this is one type of terrain that the San Juans really dish out nicely) in a managed setting, move about 15 miles West of Telluride (or close to 2 hours by road) and hit up Silverton.

 

This is Gnar Couloir, for example, and there are plenty of others on that face.

 

 

Lots of the backside/East Face has either couloirs and/or cliff outs.  The trail map is deceptive because it shows what the mountain apparently looks like after 600" of snow.  The reality is most of the labeled slide paths on the backside neck down very tightly (even on Cabin before the multiple chokes get buried). For most lines, avoiding the choke/cliff by jumping into the trees is the ticket if one doesn't want to straightline and pray- or air it out. Ask me how I know.  The frontside/West Face is a very different story- most lines down can be accomplished without any real technical skiing- much more in line with a resort double black or even a tough labeled black run. The North side feeding into the base dishes out tighter trees in pretty decent but not ridiculous steeps. The whole mountain isn't super extreme, but it is all super-solid advanced skiing and up, and there is enough top shelf terrain to satisfy most skiers. I feel blessed to have this beast in my backyard.

 

Silverton is a place where scouting things on Google Earth and youtube before a visit is invaluable- triply for the unguided season, and IMO April unguided is the time to ski this mountain.  Don't expect Gnar Couloir to be open for unguided without excellent snow stability, however.

post #189 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

If you are looking for San Juan Couloirs (and this is one type of terrain that the San Juans really dish out nicely) in a managed setting, move about 15 miles West of Telluride (or close to 2 hours by road) and hit up Silverton.

 

This is Gnar Couloir, for example, and there are plenty of others on that face.

 

 

Lots of the backside/East Face has either couloirs and/or cliff outs.  The trail map is deceptive because it shows what the mountain apparently looks like after 600" of snow.  The reality is most of the labeled slide paths on the backside neck down very tightly (even on Cabin before the multiple chokes get buried). For most lines, avoiding the choke/cliff by jumping into the trees is the ticket if one doesn't want to straightline and pray- or air it out. Ask me how I know.  The frontside/West Face is a very different story- most lines down can be accomplished without any real technical skiing- much more in line with a resort double black or even a tough labeled black run. The North side feeding into the base dishes out tighter trees in pretty decent but not ridiculous steeps. The whole mountain isn't super extreme, but it is all super-solid advanced skiing and up, and there is enough top shelf terrain to satisfy most skiers. I feel blessed to have this beast in my backyard.

 

Silverton is a place where scouting things on Google Earth and youtube before a visit is invaluable- triply for the unguided season, and IMO April unguided is the time to ski this mountain.  Don't expect Gnar Couloir to be open for unguided without excellent snow stability, however.

Asking how you know? Just curious, those couloirs and spines look pretty darned serious. Not sure I understood the chokepoint reference, but is it every couloir roughly funnels into one channel and then "straightline and pray- or air it out" is it cliffs - which can be aired or absolute no-go terrain, again just looking for enlightenment. Perhaps a google earth topographical image would be welcome here...

post #190 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post

Asking how you know? Just curious, those couloirs and spines look pretty darned serious. Not sure I understood the chokepoint reference, but is it every couloir roughly funnels into one channel and then "straightline and pray- or air it out" is it cliffs - which can be aired or absolute no-go terrain, again just looking for enlightenment. Perhaps a google earth topographical image would be welcome here...

Silverton has a lot of lines that are big snowfields off the ridge, that then neck down in a couloir, that then open back up to wider aprons below.

Most of the backside funnels into couloirs or cliffs, so the less spicy option tends to be aiming for the trees in the middle 1/3 of the descent.

The picture shown is some of the most remote terrain in the ski area (and some of the rowdiest, though I won't pretend to have any idea what the toughest line at Silverton is-just that it is too tough for me).
post #191 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post


Silverton has a lot of lines that are big snowfields off the ridge, that then neck down in a couloir, that then open back up to wider aprons below.

Most of the backside funnels into couloirs or cliffs, so the less spicy option tends to be aiming for the trees in the middle 1/3 of the descent.

The picture shown is some of the most remote terrain in the ski area (and some of the rowdiest, though I won't pretend to have any idea what the toughest line at Silverton is-just that it is too tough for me).


I have no idea where any of these areas are and suffering from a new-found fascination with Googel Earth renditions of terrain post our L'Espace Killy adventure a couple of weeks ago, Larry Page is helping me get over the withdrawal - so here is a Google Earth Rendition of Silverton and the terrain which I am guessing where all this heroic terrain is..take a look...and please feel free to correct. The map is looking basically South-East of Silverton Ski base and over the ridge line which you mention (not sure if this is the ridge line..) ..anyway here it is - please click on it for a larger visual

 

post #192 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 
 

Asking how you know? Just curious, those couloirs and spines look pretty darned serious. Not sure I understood the chokepoint reference, but is it every couloir roughly funnels into one channel and then "straightline and pray- or air it out" is it cliffs - which can be aired or absolute no-go terrain, again just looking for enlightenment. Perhaps a google earth topographical image would be welcome here...

If you're asking what a chokepoint--or just choke--is, it's the spot in a couloir where a skier stops and takes out his cell phone for a long conversation (or any place narrow enough that you can't just ski freely through but have to be precise with where and when you turn. I wouldn't call a cliff that you have to jump or rappel a choke, I would call it a cliff.).

post #193 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

If you're asking what a chokepoint--or just choke--is, it's the spot in a couloir where a skier stops and takes out his cell phone to take a picture and post it on Instagram.

 

FIFY.  ;-)

post #194 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whippersnapper View Post
 


Hey dustyfog.  Oh, that's so funny:

 

"...'Follow me Dad' is a threat..."

 

Nice!

 

JayT answered you on Heaven's Eleven.  That is the scariest-looking line I've ever seen.  Kim Havell made the first female descent described in a TGR thread below, but the pics and video are gone, I can't find a good video...Kim's POV was scary as shit.  The whole route is a crux, her ski tips and tails were catching, releasing...just inches of traverse at best. (Damn TGR's elimination of their best photography!):

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/227670-TR-Telluride-s-Heavens-Eleven-3

 

Cheers 

Found this on YouTube: This is up there with anything anywhere in the world, had no idea Telluride backcountry had this in store for the intrepid, and here there are 4 of them...

 

Glad to watch from the comfort of a MacBook screen! Our most recent trip to L'Espace Killy hit my Outer Limits without question, and this is Outer Space :eek from this person's perspective-matches anything anywhere, Alps, US, Canada...talk about narrow, steep, and just pure adrenaline. Definitely very high consequence couloir...

 

This was another couloir in the same general area I presume, some of you may have skied these two for all I know..put your hands up, guilty parties, salud!

 

 

Heaven's 11 looks just crazy.

Disappointing vid, does not show exit. Snow looked pretty good though. Talking about waiting for good snow. Wow, if that's firm there's no way without ropes. From the still, you turn left then traverse above the cliff? For how long.

 

Second vid, the Oakley ad, ruined what could be good. A gopro pole shot showing the goggles? Poor.

 

The Euros were born crazy with this stuff. I remember seeing lines through the rocks in 1980 at Tignes which were beyond belief.  There were very few over here doing that stuff back then.  You had to go see a film in a theater to see Patrick Vallencant, Sylvain Saudan and people like that. Really more like ski mountaineering.

 

 

I mean this vid I guess is just average for a lot of those guys. Green slopes of extreme.

 

Chamonix, Aiguille du Midi North Face:

 

https://youtu.be/bipxH48EIUk

 

 

 

Patrick Vallencant and his pedal hop turn for super steeps in slo mo.

This is steep! And with a large pack on. It says 55 deg but looks more.

 

https://youtu.be/2soYD8LX7YI

Pedal Hop Turn article from 1980 Ski Mag.

 

I think that may be from this film in Peru skiing Yerupaja, over 6,600m and more like 65deg.

 

https://youtu.be/u_kqQNT6ZQg

I've read a number of descriptions of the pedal hop turn but in my vast experience of doing it a few times in places where you only needed two or three before the slope eases off, and not as steep as the videos,  your body actually figures it out pretty quickly. (It had better). On slopes that steep your downhill leg is full extended and your uphill is fully bent. It becomes obvious that the only way to turn is to extend the uphill leg hard and swing the skis around. You can't jump off the downhill leg because it's already extended. The part you have to think about is keeping the upper body out over the slope and not getting back on the skis or leaning uphill, or you go shooting across the slope, or worse. But the actual jumping part is pretty natural but strenuous and I'm sure I'd wear out if I did have to do more than a few turns that way. 

post #195 of 198

OldG : the question for WS was specific to the location and terrain, i.e. do those particular cluster of couloirs all funnel into a channel/chokepoint where there is a way into trees as the 'out' , the alternatives are cliff hucks. That is not clear from the pictures, nor the video or the Google Map terrain rendition. Hence the query.

post #196 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 

OldG : the question for WS was specific to the location and terrain, i.e. do those particular cluster of couloirs all funnel into a channel/chokepoint where there is a way into trees as the 'out' , the alternatives are cliff hucks. That is not clear from the pictures, nor the video or the Google Map terrain rendition. Hence the query.

Well-if my misdirected answer prevents someone from pulling out their phone in the choke of a chute it won't have been a total waste of time.

post #197 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyfog View Post
 


I have no idea where any of these areas are and suffering from a new-found fascination with Googel Earth renditions of terrain post our L'Espace Killy adventure a couple of weeks ago, Larry Page is helping me get over the withdrawal - so here is a Google Earth Rendition of Silverton and the terrain which I am guessing where all this heroic terrain is..take a look...and please feel free to correct. The map is looking basically South-East of Silverton Ski base and over the ridge line which you mention (not sure if this is the ridge line..) ..anyway here it is - please click on it for a larger visual

 

 

Your picture is of a South-Facing bowl on the opposite side of the Silverton boundary line. The confusion is probably related to my use of the term "backside." At Silverton, the backside is used to refer to the East face of the mountain- "backside" because it is the furthest away from the actual town of Silverton, while some of the West face is in view of the town.

 

As for what I mean by chokes, and cliffs, lets look at the Silverton area map (calling it a "trail map" doesn't seem to fit).

 

 

 

If you get on Google Earth and look at that "East Face" during the summer, what you see is a series of waterfalls in most of those labeled lines. In the winter, those are couloirs, with surrounding cliffs.

 

Look at the lines labeled Waterfall (guess where that name comes from) and Mandatory Air. Both of those start as HUGE snowfields at an excellent pitch, before turning pretty seriously technical. However, you can trade straightlining a couloir or hucking a cliff for tree skiing by using "Waterfall Ramp," a 50' wide band of band of trees (that have kept erosion at bay) and thus allows one to make turns and keep skis on the ground.

 

Such tree bail outs are located in several other places, and the guides use them liberally to get mere mortal skiers into the good snowfields without forcing them to air it out with stuff directly downhill.

post #198 of 198

ANChronism: Got it, and coordinates too..so this is what Silverton discussion is focusing on and Gnar Couloir is facing North, below Storm Peak : Thanks and now understand your meaning of chokepoint and wooded bail out exit...will not know it till one is on it of course, but understood now

 

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