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Wife's pow oriented skis!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I've been reading a lot of reviews to find some pow skis I can buy for my wife... unfortunately it took a long time and some unskiable powder days on her 78mm before she realized the need for something wide so she doesn't have to spend the day at home or rent skis when we get a dump!

 

She is 5'3" / 130lbs and is a solid intermediate and would only/mostly ski piste but she started venturing on some ungroomed, bowls and even some off piste! But she probably won't like anything that's super fat and not fun even on some crud/groommers from time to time!

 

Here is the complete form! :D

 

 

  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Idaho mostly

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry) groomed runs. Looking for a powder ski

  3. How many days a year do you ski? about 30 days

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? Intermediate, she was able to ski most of the terrain in alta including some of the high traverse runs

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'3" / 130

 

Some of the skis I'm considering (currently skiing Dynastar Idyll 152cm):

 

Nordica La Nina 169cm (she did demo, liked but as expected not very happy skiing on piste), maybe it's just a big jump from her 78mm.

 

Armada TSTw 165cm. Haven't skied these, only 100mm but has a good amount of tip rocker, so maybe it will be enough for what she is planning on doing

 

Rockette 115 164cm, 108mm underfoot, good amount of rocker tip/tail.

 

Rossignol S7w 168cm, I believe this is 105mm underfoot, but I'm not really sure.

 

I think she would be better off on something that's not wider than 105 by much... right now I'm kinda going towards the Salomon rockette 115, base pretty much on reviews and the dimensions.

 

Also it's really important that the ski can also do well on the days following and ski tracked in a good way!

 

She also demo the S3w but at 95mm underfoot I don't wanna get something that won't make she able to ski big dumps... we had a lot of trips planned for next winter, we will be skiing pretty much the whole MCP resorts except for Whistler... so that includes Alta/Bird, JH, Aspen, and Lake Tahoe and I'm pretty sure she won't survive on her Dynastar Idyll at those places...

 

Am I thinking the right thing? Or should I just get some wide all mountain around 90mm - 100mm? Like Samba, or S3w?

 

She is not an aggressive/strong skier so she won't be able to handle anything that is too demanding or requires more aggressive skiing.

 

I'd prefer to find something during the summer so I don't have to pay full price, but if there is anything good coming up next year I would probably wait and buy something more expensive!

 

Other skis I would consider DPS Yvette 112, it has similar dimensions to the La Nina. Is it better on grommers, crud than the La Nina? How about some of the new Rossi Star/Savory?

 

I'm really totally open for suggestions... anything other than a super fat powder only skis! 

 

Last year I was really happy to buy something based on suggestions here, so I hope that it will work again, since she had a very limited time demoing skis!

 

Just throw me whatever you got! :-)

post #2 of 12

As a rule, easier in powder means less great on groomers. Obviously there is variation between designs, but broadly speaking, that's the way it is. Honestly, you have a pretty good list of skis there IMO. If she's interested in something a bit more incremental than some of those (sort of in the zone of the S7W - but IMO a bit more evolved), look at the Praxis Le Petite. For someone 130 pounds, it'll serve as a fine powder friendly, "do everything" ski.

 

I'm too lazy to check models - but something like the Armada VJJ is likely worth a look. Heck - any "five point" design in the "low to mid" 160s to "low to mid" 170s,  and  100-115 wide zone is probably worth a look. (obviously a couple mm one way or another does not matter).

 

FWIW, her reaction to something like the La Nina is probably partially due to not being used to a wider ski. A fair number of folks would rate it as decidedly "all mountain" capable. But again - most of those "fatter" designs take a bit of getting used to.

 

Lower tail rocker is OK, but for my .02, decent tip, and at least some tail rocker is key.

post #3 of 12

Atomic Century or Line Pandora are both very easy to ski. Century is ver forgiving and will do fine on groomers. Century is not that wide, but is used by a number of heli ski ops, so it ought to be wide enough. Also, it's a good value ski.(not so expensive)

 

However.... "I don't wanna get something that won't make she (sic) able to ski big dumps" is a red flag. No ski will make her able. Keep your expectations in the realm of reality or she is going to feel bad about the outcome and so will you.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom View Post

However.... "I don't wanna get something that won't make she (sic) able to ski big dumps" is a red flag. No ski will make her able. Keep your expectations in the realm of reality or she is going to feel bad about the outcome and so will you.

 

That was a bad choice of words! I wish I had said, "make her wanna try to ski powder and not be complaining about the skis", like she did the last two times! This season she was with me two different days when we got about 10 inches or so... first day, she gave up after two runs, second day she didn't even try to go skiing! My only concern is that a wide all mountain will make things better but won't keep her happy! Also considering she is an intermediate she needs more help from the skis than a more advanced skiers!

 

Again, was a really bad choice of words, but I do realize we are just trying to get the right "tool" for the job, and not trying to make her a better skier by getting new skis that would just make her fly through pillows! redface.gif

post #5 of 12

I am likely the biggest TST fan on this site, but I will say it feels really short on anything but powder, where the entire ski is in the snow.  On hard pack you will likely want the next size up and that really helps in pow too.  If you want powder skis, Praxis makes great powder skis.  Look at the RX in a 169.  It will give her lots of float and still works well on the groomers.  http://praxisskis.com/shop/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=12&Itemid=3

post #6 of 12

If you get the opportunity, put her on a pair of DPS Yvettes for a few demo runs.  We ski Brundage all season, and in my opinion, it's the perfect fat ski of a 2 or 3 ski quiver here.  I've skied the Wailers for a couple seasons now, and ever since owning them, my wife has been jealous of how easy they make skiing deep snow appear.  Her daily driver at Brundage is the Volkl Aura, but she finally demoed a bunch of fatter skis this season in order to make the deeper snow more fun and less work.  Looking for "nimble" and "fun" more than fall-line charger, she was disappointed in the Volkl Kiku and ??? Nemesis (expecting a huge upgrade over her Auras, but not experiencing that) but really liked the La Nina.  The La Ninas climbed up onto the surface of the snow immediately for her, and made skiing the deeper snow fun.  A couple days later (in a lot poorer conditions) she had the opportunity to ski the DPS Yvettes, and absolutely fell in love (and it showed in her skiing).  The words I kept hearing over and over as she skied them were were "easy" and "fun" amid a bunch of laughing.  The Yvettes made the deep snow easier when compared to the La Ninas, were the most nimble things she's ever been on in the trees, were a ball in the bumps, and the best of the fatter skis on the groomers.  (Gravity Sports in McCall is the local DPS dealer there, and they have 4 or 5 pairs of Wailers and Yvettes set up and parked in the Brundage rental shop on the mountain to make demo of the Yvette and Wailer quick and easy...)  My wife enjoyed the Yvettes so much that she bought a pair.  

post #7 of 12

mfa81: For what it's worth, I've found that as my powder technique improved, skiing in powder on mid-fat skis works out fine.  I'm a light weight, so have even skied my all-mountain in 10+ inches a few times.  They are 75 underfoot but have a wide shovel.  In early April, I was having fun with my new (to me anyway) Blizzard Black Pearls, which are 88 underfoot.  As you know, that included some days with fresh powder well over 6 inches in places.

 

I've demo'd skis over 100 underfoot.  I think your wife might appreciate a ski 90-100 that is more likely to be fun in a variety of conditions, not just fresh powder.  All depends on how soon you think she'll venture into deep powder, on or off trail.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

mfa81: For what it's worth, I've found that as my powder technique improved, skiing in powder on mid-fat skis works out fine.  I'm a light weight, so have even skied my all-mountain in 10+ inches a few times.  They are 75 underfoot but have a wide shovel.  In early April, I was having fun with my new (to me anyway) Blizzard Black Pearls, which are 88 underfoot.  As you know, that included some days with fresh powder well over 6 inches in places.

 

I've demo'd skis over 100 underfoot.  I think your wife might appreciate a ski 90-100 that is more likely to be fun in a variety of conditions, not just fresh powder.  All depends on how soon you think she'll venture into deep powder, on or off trail.

 

 

See in bold, the S3w might be a better choice than the S7. Supposed to be fine(ish) on the hard pack and a 'cheater ski' most everywhere else. For her experience, height and weight I would go with the 160cm. Otherwise if all else fails lessons and more lessons. 

 
 
post #9 of 12

The S7W is in as narrow a range as you'd reasonably want to go IMO. A very good friend  - a bit smaller and lighter than the OP's spouse - grew up skiing in the alps, has strong ties to the race community, etc, etc. A few years ago she got talked into an S7W. Next season she got her spouse S7s. Since then,  I don't remember the last time I've seen either on their narrower skis. Whether or not it is a pow day. I think the S7W is a great contender in this context - much more so than the S3. As I said before, I think the Praxis Le Petite is likely even better (and currently on sale -- with an additional 10% off with code EPIC, and some 20% codes floating around if you know any previous customers that'll part with them. 

 

BTW - you can make any ski work in powder - but sub-90 (certainly sub-80) skis with wide shovels are, in general, incredibly sub-optimal for powder. It is a matter of how much pain you want someone to incur undoing a ski's design in order to force it to work in powder. IMO, it is far, far easier to carve a modern 100-ish to -110-ish hybrid than it is to ski powder on a sub-90 ski. Even for someone relatively small and light.

post #10 of 12

These are my thoughts, as a 5'3" and ~130 lb female. Take them or leave them.

 

1. Don't go too fat, or too long. She is going from a 78-waisted ski in a 152 to  a fatter and longer ski. AND she is an intermediate. I understand you want your wife on super fat powder boards and you want her to hang, but it's not going to happen immediately. She will be better served with a more all-mountain ski in a 95-100 waist width that she can learn to ski powder and off piste with instead of a ski that is targeted towards these things. In the end, this ski is not what you would choose as an advanced (presumably) skier, it is a whole different animal. Don't buy her the skis you would buy for yourself, buy her the skis that will help her in this transition.

 

2. A mid-fat ski doesnt mean she won't be able to ski powder. (is that what we're calling midfat these days?) She is not a big person. A ski in this waist width  will be perfectly fine for her to ski powder and crud in, in fact she will probably feel like a rockstar, which is important when starting to venture off into new terrain.

 

3. Something more traditionally cambered might be nice, ie not super duper rockered. I'm thinking of something mid to high 90-waisted. Maybe the Nordica Nemesis (98) or Wildfire (106?) as these would be AMAZING skis for encouraging an intermediate to get off piste and giving them confidence to explore the mountain. This will be the ideal transition ski from a narrow and short beginner ski to a fatter and longer all-mountain. She will think that these skis are AMAZING in powder. In a year or more, she will get much much better at skiing these conditions, and will start skiing her all mountains every day. Soon her old skis will be a forgotten relic in the garage. Then she will say, 'hey honey, I want some REAL powder skis' and she can get those fat super rockered skis and leave you in the dust.

 

Of course, if this is like her only pair of skis she will ever have ever again, then maybe go for the big powder skis. But if the idea of upgrading (skis, not wives) in a few years is not out of the question, then I think this will be the best course you could take.

post #11 of 12
Fischer is one brand that I found to ski deep snow better than the width would suggest. Also very light and playful, very nice in moguls and great in cut up snow. Koa 88 or 98 in the women's models.

My girlfriend was also an intermediate groomer-only skier, then got a pair of Nordica Nemesis, 98 wide, loves them. She felt more confident immediately, which helped her to relax more and improve technique and be comfortable with a wider range of conditions. That's the kind of result you're looking for because you don't always get a big dump of untracked pow, for more than a run or two.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey guys... long time since I haven't been to this topic. Well, I kinda talk to my wife and we both thought that following some of the suggestions here to go for something 90-100 would be a better option for now and we can go wider down the road once she gets used and start liking the stuff!

 

I've found for great prices pretty much all of the suggestions above... I haven't heard much about the Dynastar Legend Paradise, I like the rocker/camber/rocker profile and I found a 2011/2012 Paradise (161cm) for $250! seems to me that the 2012/2013 is unchanged other than graphics, but I'm not quite sure about that. Also found Blizzard Samba (159cm) for a very good price at $350.

 

Now given she is not a strong skier, and likes to cruise down the mountain instead of charging and driving the skis hard... I'm going towards the Paradise!

 

Can anyone confirm that it's the same ski as the 2012/2013 white/blue paradise? LIke can I read the reviews and consider that they would also apply for the 2011/2012? Are we doing the right thing moving away from the Samba given her more relaxed skiing style?

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