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Educational Knee Anatomy Video by MD

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

This appears to be a thorough video showing the knee's anatomy.  It helped me comprehend the several parts of the knee, and hopefully it can help someone else.

 

 

http://www.howardluksmd.com/knee-faq/knee-anatomy-video/

post #2 of 12

I agree that is one of the best overviews of the knee joint.  Why were you researching the knee?

 

Here is another source for good relevant videos:

 

http://www.eorthopod.com/video-list

http://www.eorthopod.com/videos/anterior-cruciate-ligament-injuries

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello marznc.  I have an appointment with a sports ortho. for a knee injury and am trying to educate myself on the subject.  I want to make the best treatment decisions because I want to ski for many more years!

post #4 of 12

BacktoSnow:  I know how you feel.  I spent last summer and fall rehabbing a knee after popping an ACL.  Did a lot of research before deciding to be a coper, meaning no ACL reconstruction surgery.  For me, that worked out well.  Every knee situation is different.

 

Have you seen the recent study reported by Dr. Marx about recreational skiers he treated in 2003-2008?  Or the 5-year follow up for a randomized clinical trial done in Sweden?

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

marznc: Congrats on rehabbing.  I'm hoping to be able to avoid surgery, but am not ruling it out.  

What I really want to know is; If I can cope with the pain, can I still be doing long-term damage, and how much? 

It feels like it could be ACL, MCL, and meniscus.  I  want to make an informed decision about treatment, and will continue to scour for info. and also ask the specialists.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BacktoSnow View Post

marznc: Congrats on rehabbing.  I'm hoping to be able to avoid surgery, but am not ruling it out.  

What I really want to know is; If I can cope with the pain, can I still be doing long-term damage, and how much? 

It feels like it could be ACL, MCL, and meniscus.  I  want to make an informed decision about treatment, and will continue to scour for info. and also ask the specialists.

Ongoing pain is not a good sign.  In my case, I didn't have pain and the MCL and meniscus damage could heal without surgical intervention.  The MRI was pretty clear.  More importantly, I didn't have any instability.  My surgeon agreed with my decision given my age and interests.

 

Any decisions you make should be based on talking with an experienced orthopedic surgeon.  Sometimes a second opinion is worthwhile too.

 

Are you working with a physical therapist?  Early PT is important regardless of when or if surgery is done.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yes, I will also be looking for a physical therapist.  The pain is only present after I run (more pain) or bike (less pain). 

post #8 of 12

When did you mess up your knee?  I didn't do any PT exercises involving impact until after about 8 weeks post-injury.  Didn't do any running until after Month 3.  The sooner you start formal PT, the better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BacktoSnow View Post

Yes, I will also be looking for a physical therapist.  The pain is only present after I run (more pain) or bike (less pain). 

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

The injury occurred 2 years ago (26 months).  I didn't do any intense physical activity for two months afterwards, and haven't done much running since the injury.  When I started running this month it started to hurt again.  I can feel the pain on both sides of the knee and around the knee cap (above and below).  This is why I'm thinking it's the ACL, MCL, meniscus, and possibly other damage. 

post #10 of 12

An old injury is quite a different story.  Have you found this thread yet?  Someone who decided to do ACL reconstruction surgery recently about 5 years after the initial injury.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/116863/apparently-ive-been-skiing-without-an-acl-the-last-five-years

Quote:
Originally Posted by BacktoSnow View Post

The injury occurred 2 years ago (26 months).  I didn't do any intense physical activity for two months afterwards, and haven't done much running since the injury.  When I started running this month it started to hurt again.  I can feel the pain on both sides of the knee and around the knee cap (above and below).  This is why I'm thinking it's the ACL, MCL, meniscus, and possibly other damage. 

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

I've been to two different orthopedic MDs and received very similar diagnoses from each.  They believe that physical therapy may solve my problem, and wanted to hold off on MRI until I have tried it for 6 weeks.  I haven't used the knee beyond walking since the injury (two years ago), and this is why they believe it became irritated when I returned to running and biking without building up to it.

 

Both MDs said biking is better than running for knees.

They said that the exercise of pulling weight that is attached to your ankle area forward is a bad exercise (as mentioned elsewhere on the forum).

Recommended exercises were:  Wall Squats, Leg Presses, Single Leg Squat (with body weight), and Straight Leg Raises.  Here's to physical therapy!

post #12 of 12

Giving PT a chance first has it's advantages.  Improving proprioception by doing balance exercises is also useful.  Best to work on both legs/knees equally, and not focus too much on the bad one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BacktoSnow View Post

I've been to two different orthopedic MDs and received very similar diagnoses from each.  They believe that physical therapy may solve my problem, and wanted to hold off on MRI until I have tried it for 6 weeks.  I haven't used the knee beyond walking since the injury (two years ago), and this is why they believe it became irritated when I returned to running and biking without building up to it.

 

Both MDs said biking is better than running for knees.

They said that the exercise of pulling weight that is attached to your ankle area forward is a bad exercise (as mentioned elsewhere on the forum).

Recommended exercises were:  Wall Squats, Leg Presses, Single Leg Squat (with body weight), and Straight Leg Raises.  Here's to physical therapy!

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