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Anyone know about the Rossignol 9SL I-Box? - Page 2

post #31 of 52

I have a 2011-12 9SL slantnose ski, it is the design without any rocker and it came in a 175 cm length max. I bought the 175 length, 6'4", 250lbs, and it was the right length choice. For its year, it was the non-FIS slalom ski. I am curious if it is essentially the same ski as #4 without rocker?  Also, is the ibox ski the same as the TPX ski, just the plate/binding system is different?

 

The ski I own does not have great grip on ice I discovered. This may be mostly due to the bottom bevel that a shop put on for me when new (basically won't be going back to them). Compared to my Blizzard race stock GS skis, the grip is night and day. I will have the ski ground this off season and make sure the bevels are done correctly next year. Planning to start with a .25/3 and up or variable the bottom bevel till I like the ski's performance. I figure the tune is mostly limiting the grip, but it might be the ski has its limits as well. It sure feels torsionally stiff, very similar to my RS Blizzard. On non ice snow, I enjoyed the ski a lot. Didn't run it much in gates, but planning to do so next season.

 

Rossi's naming is very confusing, although to a degree, its the same with other company's race offerings.

post #32 of 52

Yeah, I see that in the catalog.  I had thought that the full suspension was the external doohickeys on the GS ski.    Plate is the same, no external fittings on top sheet of Slalom.  Update, the catalog shows GS race full suspension and Sl race suspension technology.


Edited by ScotsSkier - 4/25/13 at 10:52am
post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Can't speak to the graphic, don't know why the first ski has a binding and the second does not, nor does it seem to have the I-Box. Went to a Rossi tech manual (page 18 below) to find out about the plates (I'm plate-obssessed. Nasty condition.) The R18 comes in two sections, like some VIST plates. The I-Box is a single plate, or really two bits connected by the I-beam. And the R18 (#1 in your site photos) is the real racing setup. The I-Box (#2) is for juniors; the language suggests it's the same specs as #1 but with a composite I-Box, which I assume softens up the flex a touch. #3 is the I-Box for adults, appears to be Rossi's beer league/club ski, pretty sure the I-Box is still solid alu

 

Great post for the info! Thanks. Seems like there are differences from what's out there.

Plate obsessed? You purchase any plates separately? Used to be easy to find, now quite difficult. Not sure what's happening to VIST..

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Seems to be some confusion here.  The R18 spec is the WC/race stock.  Would have to check on current year but Mo my 2011 WC stocks have the connected plate, the X-box plate shown above, and all the genuine stuff i have seen uses this.     The plate is mainly plastic with ally inserts for the mounts. Most plates seem to be going in this direction now rather than the solid ally plates from yesteryear.   The old Ibox from several years ago was mainly metal but that has not been used for a while.  Since they switch to the PX from the FKS IIRC or if not from about 2009.

 

You may be getting confused about the Blizz Slalom.  I thought the "full suspension" was on the GS ski.?   I have the race stock WC slalom (not true WC stock unfortunately - there are VERY few real deal WC Blizzard stock in the US).  However teh regular race stock with the Marker plate is an excellent ski, not just for gates

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

The shot above is from 2013 manual, so I assume that the change was made between 2011 and now. My I-Box is solid alu, so have a feeling that a while back they began to de-emphasize the role of the beam and put more reinforcement into the ski itself. 

 

As far as the Blizzard, their site, under "World Cup Race," shows a "SL Race Suspension" model that clearly has a Marker WC piston plate. http://www.blizzard-ski.com/int/products/detail/product/show/sl-race-suspension.html Not the same as the GS model, but a piston. I was surprised too. It's the only adult SL model shown. 

 

Good to know that the WC model works as a general ski. 

 

http://www.blizzard-ski.com/int/products/detail/product/show/sl-race-suspension.html#

 

Yes, the Slalom Race I've seen in a shop. Also, I think it's the one I tried on snow.

The plate had the piston and if you look from the side there is segmented sheet metal along most of the length of the plate..

 

I'm pretty sure I've seen another version without the piston and metal edge on the plate. Maybe it was an earlier year, I'm not sure.

 

Marker is changing their Comp 16 and 20 bindings for next year I believe.

 

btw, if you have junior racers, don't let them use the Marker Comp 10. Even if they're light. (well under 60lbs maybe ok) It has very poor boot hold down. - They will get play in the system. Use the 12 even if set near minimum.

Found this out the hardway skiing them myself. rolleyes.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post

I have a 2011-12 9SL slantnose ski, it is the design without any rocker and it came in a 175 cm length max. I bought the 175 length, 6'4", 250lbs, and it was the right length choice. For its year, it was the non-FIS slalom ski. I am curious if it is essentially the same ski as #4 without rocker?  Also, is the ibox ski the same as the TPX ski, just the plate/binding system is different?

 

The ski I own does not have great grip on ice I discovered. This may be mostly due to the bottom bevel that a shop put on for me when new (basically won't be going back to them). Compared to my Blizzard race stock GS skis, the grip is night and day. I will have the ski ground this off season and make sure the bevels are done correctly next year. Planning to start with a .25/3 and up or variable the bottom bevel till I like the ski's performance. I figure the tune is mostly limiting the grip, but it might be the ski has its limits as well. It sure feels torsionally stiff, very similar to my RS Blizzard. On non ice snow, I enjoyed the ski a lot. Didn't run it much in gates, but planning to do so next season.

 

Rossi's naming is very confusing, although to a degree, its the same with other company's race offerings.

This is total conjecture, but yes I think so. I'm highly skeptical of the Tpx binding system. I won't call it a plate. The earlier plastic version of that they used for CS70/80 skis compromised them seriously for highl level skiing on hard snow.They were great skis.

Maybe Tpx is different enough though, but you've got that rail where the binding slides that could be a problem.

 

Most likely the tune was terrible. You might have a 2+ degree and very inconsistent base bevel.

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Great post for the info! Thanks. Seems like there are differences from what's out there.

Plate obsessed? You purchase any plates separately? Used to be easy to find, now quite difficult. Not sure what's happening to VIST..

 

 

http://www.blizzard-ski.com/int/products/detail/product/show/sl-race-suspension.html#

 

Yes, the Slalom Race I've seen in a shop. Also, I think it's the one I tried on snow.

The plate had the piston and if you look from the side there is segmented sheet metal along most of the length of the plate..

 

I'm pretty sure I've seen another version without the piston and metal edge on the plate. Maybe it was an earlier year, I'm not sure.

 

Marker is changing their Comp 16 and 20 bindings for next year I believe.

 

btw, if you have junior racers, don't let them use the Marker Comp 10. Even if they're light. (well under 60lbs maybe ok) It has very poor boot hold down. - They will get play in the system. Use the 12 even if set near minimum.

Found this out the hardway skiing them myself. rolleyes.gif

 

 

Yes, the current marker Piston Plate used on the Blizzard has ally along the sides.  Doesnt really add to teh stiffnes though.  The Blizzard race skis pre 2011 had the Vist Nylon/Metal X plate, similar to the one Nordica used to use .

 

I am sure you also know that on the Marker the forward pressure screw should be turned 1 turn past flush if you want them to stay on :)

post #35 of 52

Wow. I'm usually pretty good at this "figure out the models" game, but I'm definitely in over my head with Rossi and Blizzard. I've had the Fischer line down for a while now, despite their infuriating habit of putting "RC4" in huge but meaningless letters on every ski they've ever made. Based on that accomplishment, I thought I could understand anything, but apparently I was wrong.

 

As someone who's pondering a new pair of beer league racers for next year, and whose shop guy had recommended looking at Dynastar (whose feel I generally like anyway) and Rossi due to a possible synergy between their less stout flex and my light weight, I was already kind of looking into these before I started trying to digest this thread. To make things even more confusing, he was talking about a ski that was essentially the Course Ti with a Rossi topsheet, but I am not seeing that one among all the many models on the Rossi site. And Blizzard. Sheesh. Am I imagining it, or do they offer every one of their race skis with two different top sheets and monikers and target audiences? They MUST be doing this, because if they're not, it means they are making about 10 different models of SL skis and 10 more for GS, based on their website.

 

Anyway, to my real point, ScotsSkier, you obviously spend a lot of time on race skis. I don't really understand your consistent recommendation to use race stock models, but since I'm a lot less experienced with skiing multitudes of skis, I can't dismiss it out of hand. So let me pose it to you this way: If you were to make a recommendation for a 50 year old 135lb woman with solid hard snow technique but who was only a casual racer, coming to you looking for a beer league ski, what would you suggest trying? Would you STILL be on the race stock kick? Or would you back down? For background, I've been skiing the Blizzard Supersonic 167. Like it a lot, but looking for something a bit damper and more rut-tolerant, without being such a long-turner that it's not satisfying to free-ski on a small hill. Liked the Course Ti 171 but didn't get to try it in gates or even on a really good test pitch. Have a feeling I belong on the 168 RX12, but so far as I can tell demoing one of these is impracticable. Not to mention the price factor. You been on the Fly Up that iriponsnow is peddling?

 

Recognize this as mild thread drift, so feel free to send me over to a different topic if you want.

post #36 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

I am sure you also know that on the Marker the forward pressure screw should be turned 1 turn past flush if you want them to stay on :)

 

Well crap. Is that my problem with my Markers? Where you been when I needed you, dude?

post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Well crap. Is that my problem with my Markers? Where you been when I needed you, dude?

 

It is probably part of it, the extra forward pressure is SOP on both Marker and the older Atomic race binding.  

 

I saw your other thread, just for reference I am 165#, 5'8", 285 BSL and a long way past 50. (Although I have not told my bindings my age)   I am now running 12-14 on speed skis, 12-13 on GS and 12 on Slalom.  Even free skiing I have now found myself running around 10 normally. (i have a variety of Tyrolia/Marker/Atomic/Look/Salomon)  I had thought 8-9 was OK till i smashed up my wrist at the start of the season after a pre release on a GS ski, free-skiing, at 8.5.    As always, YMMV, you have to find a level of risk/retention you are happy with

post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Wow. I'm usually pretty good at this "figure out the models" game, but I'm definitely in over my head with Rossi and Blizzard. I've had the Fischer line down for a while now, despite their infuriating habit of putting "RC4" in huge but meaningless letters on every ski they've ever made. Based on that accomplishment, I thought I could understand anything, but apparently I was wrong.

 

As someone who's pondering a new pair of beer league racers for next year, and whose shop guy had recommended looking at Dynastar (whose feel I generally like anyway) and Rossi due to a possible synergy between their less stout flex and my light weight, I was already kind of looking into these before I started trying to digest this thread. To make things even more confusing, he was talking about a ski that was essentially the Course Ti with a Rossi topsheet, but I am not seeing that one among all the many models on the Rossi site. And Blizzard. Sheesh. Am I imagining it, or do they offer every one of their race skis with two different top sheets and monikers and target audiences? They MUST be doing this, because if they're not, it means they are making about 10 different models of SL skis and 10 more for GS, based on their website.

 

Anyway, to my real point, ScotsSkier, you obviously spend a lot of time on race skis. I don't really understand your consistent recommendation to use race stock models, but since I'm a lot less experienced with skiing multitudes of skis, I can't dismiss it out of hand. So let me pose it to you this way: If you were to make a recommendation for a 50 year old 135lb woman with solid hard snow technique but who was only a casual racer, coming to you looking for a beer league ski, what would you suggest trying? Would you STILL be on the race stock kick? Or would you back down? For background, I've been skiing the Blizzard Supersonic 167. Like it a lot, but looking for something a bit damper and more rut-tolerant, without being such a long-turner that it's not satisfying to free-ski on a small hill. Liked the Course Ti 171 but didn't get to try it in gates or even on a really good test pitch. Have a feeling I belong on the 168 RX12, but so far as I can tell demoing one of these is impracticable. Not to mention the price factor. You been on the Fly Up that iriponsnow is peddling?

 

Recognize this as mild thread drift, so feel free to send me over to a different topic if you want.

Fair points.  I should clarify slightly though in that I normally recommend the race stock rather than the pseudo-race as it offers better value and performance.  If what you want is 911 type performance, you don't buy a Lexus, no matter how many gizmos it may have..... Also, particularly with slaloms, the myth that the civilian version is easier than the race stock is exactly that, a myth...

 

In your case, the answer is,  It depends!!! (spoken like a true consultant!) . You talk about beer league/Nastar, so I assume you are looking at a shortish radius GS.  You are also in Maine so going to have to deal with a lot of man-made (aka sheet ice as i recall form my time there) so if you are at all serious you want the grip of a real race stock.  However, I dont think you want a full 23m GS.  A couple of thoughts, I would suggest you try a pair of 155 (or even 158) race stock slaloms as a first reference.  Find some junior that is unloading a pair as a first point of entry.  155s are waay easier to come by than 165s on the used market.  Second would be a longer junior race stock GS, say 170 or 175 but you would need to check what plate is on it, a lot of them have the junior plate which does not work with an adult boot.  I can also check around for some used options if you are interested.  I run the for sale/wanted for our masters team

post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Great post for the info! Thanks. Seems like there are differences from what's out there.

Plate obsessed? You purchase any plates separately? Used to be easy to find, now quite difficult. Not sure what's happening to VIST..

 

 

 

btw, if you have junior racers, don't let them use the Marker Comp 10. Even if they're light. (well under 60lbs maybe ok) It has very poor boot hold down. - They will get play in the system. Use the 12 even if set near minimum.

Found this out the hardway skiing them myself. rolleyes.gif

 

 

Yeah, over time I've gotten to think that plates do a lot more than we realize, whether we add them or they come as a system. For instance, the contribution of the Marker KTI plate to the RX series. I also mount a lot of carver plates on wider skis, typically use Tyrolia. And since I've started racing, seems like the plate can be nearly as important as the ski. I have used VIST WC Air plates a little, in fact have a new pair lying around. Love them but they're silly heavy and not needed if you race Rossis. If and when I decide to run Stocklis, might well use it. 

 

Thanks for heads up on Markers. My boys use Looks, cuz I like how the elasticity allows a lower setting. Wish they still made FKS for narrow skis, better yet anatomically, but I have a coupla pair (one new, one lightly used) c. 2009 for when they're older and heavier. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Fair points.  I should clarify slightly though in that I normally recommend the race stock rather than the pseudo-race as it offers better value and performance.  If what you want is 911 type performance, you don't buy a Lexus, no matter how many gizmos it may have..... Also, particularly with slaloms, the myth that the civilian version is easier than the race stock is exactly that, a myth...

 

 I would suggest you try a pair of 155 (or even 158) race stock slaloms as a first reference.  Find some junior that is unloading a pair as a first point of entry.  155s are waay easier to come by than 165s on the used market.  Second would be a longer junior race stock GS, say 170 or 175 but you would need to check what plate is on it, a lot of them have the junior plate which does not work with an adult boot.  I can also check around for some used options if you are interested.  I run the for sale/wanted for our masters team

FWIW, I asked SS for some advice along the same lines, and he was spot on. Wanted to use a cheater GS for Masters, he encouraged going with a true WC, gave good reasons, so I did. Worked so well now contemplating moving to a longer WC. Also think the used junior GS is a good idea; at that length you'd be assured of a ski with one season, so some edge left, could well have adult plate, and should be super cheap. 

post #40 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Yeah, over time I've gotten to think that plates do a lot more than we realize, whether we add them or they come as a system. For instance, the contribution of the Marker KTI plate to the RX series. I also mount a lot of carver plates on wider skis, typically use Tyrolia. And since I've started racing, seems like the plate can be nearly as important as the ski. I have used VIST WC Air plates a little, in fact have a new pair lying around. Love them but they're silly heavy and not needed if you race Rossis. If and when I decide to run Stocklis, might well use it. 

FWIW, I asked SS for some advice along the same lines, and he was spot on. Wanted to use a cheater GS for Masters, he encouraged going with a true WC, gave good reasons, so I did. Worked so well now contemplating moving to a longer WC. Also think the used junior GS is a good idea; at that length you'd be assured of a ski with one season, so some edge left, could well have adult plate, and should be super cheap. 

Agree with you about the plates. Ever since the Volkl Power Plate ive loved plates Is that what it was called? That big plastic number that was a platform. Thing was awesome - gave such confidence at speed and in choppy stuff. It was like all the little garbage was below you and you can concentrate on the big stuff

When they went to the Motion it was a big
step back in every way except weight.
Same with Soloman's aluminum platform they had- Hangl I think it was about'01. Spent some time on the 2s gs ski with that plat. Weird ski, had reverse taper! But that plate! Total slush slayer it was fun.

One of the best skis I've ever been on was the Stockli VXL of 09 or 10 with the Vist Speedlock aluminum plate. Skied it at Big Sky powder, crud, bumps. Thing was heavy as hell but amazing. Total battleship in crud yet good in powder and high speed gs turns, good on bumps. Think it was 88 waist.

Beyond, we're you running a WCup (ie race stock not true wcup) GS ski or slalom?
If gs for next year one would have to use an old women's gs of 2? Meters-1 or 3 right.

Qcanoe, I will say that just the Blizzard WCup SL with Marker piston plate, "Race Suspension", would be a big difference from your Supersonics in terms of handling rut and uneven hard pack. It is not twitchy reactive but powerful and smooth. It's like it has some sort of electromagnetic suspension. I tried it in some weird snow but id def like to give it another ahot Has a great flex - not that stiff at all Too bad they don't make it in a 170.
Edited by Tog - 4/25/13 at 10:46pm
post #41 of 52

I ski both events. Use a SL in 165, last year of the original gold, black, and green graphic, think 2007-2008, and a GS in the longer women's length for the following year - 183. Has a 24 m radius or thereabouts, the first year of the mainly orange topsheets. Got both through Ski Depot several years ago, just stored them away until I started racing. So prolly not true race stock, the consumer WC version anyone can buy. Both have FKS 14 plates, not so much a fan of the PX's, hope the edges never wear out. biggrin.gif

post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Yeah, over time I've gotten to think that plates do a lot more than we realize, whether we add them or they come as a system. For instance, the contribution of the Marker KTI plate to the RX series. I also mount a lot of carver plates on wider skis, typically use Tyrolia. And since I've started racing, seems like the plate can be nearly as important as the ski. I have used VIST WC Air plates a little, in fact have a new pair lying around. Love them but they're silly heavy and not needed if you race Rossis. If and when I decide to run Stocklis, might well use it. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


Agree with you about the plates. Ever since the Volkl Power Plate ive loved plates Is that what it was called? That big plastic number that was a platform. Thing was awesome - gave such confidence at speed and in choppy stuff. It was like all the little garbage was below you and you can concentrate on the big stuff

When they went to the Motion it was a big
step back in every way except weight.
Same with Soloman's aluminum platform they had- Hangl I think it was about'01. Spent some time on the 2s gs ski with that plat. Weird ski, had reverse taper! But that plate! Total slush slayer it was fun.

One of the best skis I've ever been on was the Stockli VXL of 09 or 10 with the Vist Speedlock aluminum plate. Skied it at Big Sky powder, crud, bumps. Thing was heavy as hell but amazing. Total battleship in crud yet good in powder and high speed gs turns, good on bumps. Think it was 88 waist.

 

 

 

Good to see I'm not the only one that uses plates on a non-race ski.  One of the additional advantages is that normally you can also use it to make fore/aft changes on the mount without redrilling.  They can definitely make a significant difference to the feel and performance of the ski.  It is getting a little harder to find stand alone plates these days as most race skis now come with a plate and most people have worked out that the manufacture plate is usually the best matched (a quick diversion, Tina Maze skis on Stockli with Atomic bindings.  Given that the Atomic speed and GS plate is the D2, I am not sure what plate she uses???)
 
Interesting that you mention the Salomon plates.  The older Solly Poweraxe slalom plate (plastic) makes a very good and smooth plate for a non-race ski.  However what I have found is an excellent plate is the later Solly Lab GS/SG plate, ally and plastic, really makes the ski strong, smooth and stable. I still have a couple of sets stashed away. Way better than the older Hangl solid ally plate.   Other worthwhile plate is the Fischer/Tyrolia/Head (vist?) plate which can of course take any binding.   Of course the downside of these is that normally you are on your own for mounting them as jigs are virtually non-existent.  With the Fischer plate of course any slight misalignment is unimportant as you can square the binding up to the ski when you mount it.  (I have noticed on a lot of Fischer race skis that the plate mount is slightly off-square from the factory).  Another trick I have used with the Solly plates is to put screws in mount holes on the plate and fit the binding jig into these to square it up on the ski.  The tyrolia carver plate uses the standard tyrolia mount holes so it is simple
post #43 of 52

"Energy Rail" is what that Volkl was called. '00/'01 Was first year I think.

Here someone is selling an unmounted rail set with mount instructions on ebay for $74

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gear-2001-Volkl-P40-F1-Energy-Rail-ski-Accessory-4-Race-Program-Skis-EnergYrail-/360619307673?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53f695f299#ht_536wt_675

 

This is the later P50 Energy Rail plate. Already toned down a little, shaving the top down. The earlier one was much more beastly

 

Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

525x525px-LL-vbattach4364.jpg

 

525x525px-LL-vbattach4365.jpg

post #44 of 52

Post wouldn't let me put another photo in

 

Salomon Poweraxe/Hangl Plate:

Ski flexed from those brass colored spots, right?

Salomon came out with Pivot system after this for rec skis. (We were all supposed to be on them by now, remember?)

 

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/25680-Salomon-S914-FIS-bindings-vs-Rossi-FKS-155-for-GS-skis

post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Post wouldn't let me put another photo in

 

Salomon Poweraxe/Hangl Plate:

Ski flexed from those brass colored spots, right?

Salomon came out with Pivot system after this for rec skis. (We were all supposed to be on them by now, remember?)

 

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/25680-Salomon-S914-FIS-bindings-vs-Rossi-FKS-155-for-GS-skis

Yes.  There were actually U shaped brackets front and rear that mounted to the ski. The brass bits are the arms of them  There was then a pin that went through the plate to pickup the arms of the bracket so teh plate was almost fully floating

post #46 of 52

Well, now that we have completely hijacked this thread biggrin.gif  (sorry Markojp!!) to a plates discussion, I thought I would just give one more update on Blizzard plates.

 

I was just mounting up a pair of 2012 Blizzard GS (the "full suspension" one) and the marker piston plate is different from the one on the 2011 GS ski (which has the same plate as the 2012 slalom.)  The full suspension plate has the extended arms front and rear integrated into it, not unlike the older Marker piston plate that had teh GS extension except that here the carbon(like) arms are both front and rear and much longer, not unlike an Atomic D2 plate

post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Wow. I'm usually pretty good at this "figure out the models" game, but I'm definitely in over my head with Rossi and Blizzard. I've had the Fischer line down for a while now, despite their infuriating habit of putting "RC4" in huge but meaningless letters on every ski they've ever made. Based on that accomplishment, I thought I could understand anything, but apparently I was wrong.

 

As someone who's pondering a new pair of beer league racers for next year, and whose shop guy had recommended looking at Dynastar (whose feel I generally like anyway) and Rossi due to a possible synergy between their less stout flex and my light weight, I was already kind of looking into these before I started trying to digest this thread. To make things even more confusing, he was talking about a ski that was essentially the Course Ti with a Rossi topsheet, but I am not seeing that one among all the many models on the Rossi site. And Blizzard. Sheesh. Am I imagining it, or do they offer every one of their race skis with two different top sheets and monikers and target audiences? They MUST be doing this, because if they're not, it means they are making about 10 different models of SL skis and 10 more for GS, based on their website.

 

Anyway, to my real point, ScotsSkier, you obviously spend a lot of time on race skis. I don't really understand your consistent recommendation to use race stock models, but since I'm a lot less experienced with skiing multitudes of skis, I can't dismiss it out of hand. So let me pose it to you this way: If you were to make a recommendation for a 50 year old 135lb woman with solid hard snow technique but who was only a casual racer, coming to you looking for a beer league ski, what would you suggest trying? Would you STILL be on the race stock kick? Or would you back down? For background, I've been skiing the Blizzard Supersonic 167. Like it a lot, but looking for something a bit damper and more rut-tolerant, without being such a long-turner that it's not satisfying to free-ski on a small hill. Liked the Course Ti 171 but didn't get to try it in gates or even on a really good test pitch. Have a feeling I belong on the 168 RX12, but so far as I can tell demoing one of these is impracticable. Not to mention the price factor. You been on the Fly Up that iriponsnow is peddling?

 

Recognize this as mild thread drift, so feel free to send me over to a different topic if you want.

something like this?

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2011-Atomic-Race-D2-GS-171cm-Junior-Ski-w-Atomic-X12-Bindings-/200919035678?pt=Skiing&hash=item2ec7b52f1e

post #48 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Well, now that we have completely hijacked this thread biggrin.gif  (sorry Markojp!!) to a plates discussion, I thought I would just give one more update on Blizzard plates.

 

I was just mounting up a pair of 2012 Blizzard GS (the "full suspension" one) and the marker piston plate is different from the one on the 2011 GS ski (which has the same plate as the 2012 slalom.)  The full suspension plate has the extended arms front and rear integrated into it, not unlike the older Marker piston plate that had teh GS extension except that here the carbon(like) arms are both front and rear and much longer, not unlike an Atomic D2 plate

 

No, not at all! A very pleasant and informative highjack! If this becomes the official race ski info thread, that'd be great! 

post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Well, now that we have completely hijacked this thread biggrin.gif  (sorry Markojp!!) to a plates discussion, I thought I would just give one more update on Blizzard plates.

 

I was just mounting up a pair of 2012 Blizzard GS (the "full suspension" one) and the marker piston plate is different from the one on the 2011 GS ski (which has the same plate as the 2012 slalom.)  The full suspension plate has the extended arms front and rear integrated into it, not unlike the older Marker piston plate that had teh GS extension except that here the carbon(like) arms are both front and rear and much longer, not unlike an Atomic D2 plate

When you say 2012 you're talking about the '11-'12 season?

Got photos?

From reading the lit on the website, I get that the "Full suspension" on the gs and some other skis, has carbon stringers front and rear on top. Only they're about 3/4 inch wide so I don't know if stringer is the word.

 

So, you'd recommend a junior race gs ski for what weight range for an adult for beer league?

post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

When you say 2012 you're talking about the '11-'12 season?

Got photos?

From reading the lit on the website, I get that the "Full suspension" on the gs and some other skis, has carbon stringers front and rear on top. Only they're about 3/4 inch wide so I don't know if stringer is the word.

 

So, you'd recommend a junior race gs ski for what weight range for an adult for beer league?

 

Yes, the 11-12 model.  It is pretty much like a stringer and 3/4 inch is about right.   Obviously intended to provide pressure distribution/transmission to tip and tail from the plate.  Looks similar concept to the D2 plate. Will be interesting to see how it feels.  I have heard some reports that teh 2012 felt a bit more lifeless and locked in to the turn than the 2011.  I hope it is not the case as the 2011 GS was, IMHO, an awesome ski (skewed perhaps by the fact that I have had some of my best results on it!).  Hopefully i will find an improvement in the 2012.  I did notice when i mounted them up that it is noticeably heavier.

 

I normally shy away from suggesting a junior ski.  I broke the rule in this case based on qcanoes stats as a women, 135#, relative race novice. The skin I linked to filled the bill pretty well at 171, 19.5r and an adult binding at a very good price.  Normally most adult males trying to race, unless they are the original 7 stone weakling would overpower a junior ski.  Bear in mind most of teh kids on tehs are U12s at ~100-110# (although they can really work the ski) By U14 they are normally on an adult ski.  I think in this case though my rec is not a bad one.

 

What needs to be remembered is that the junior ski is not just a cheap way to get a shorter race stock ski.  They are typically a bit different and desigend for a different audience.  Which brings us nicely back to your original post in this thread!!biggrin.gif  where you showed the Rossi junior slalom...,

 

This one is only available in 150cm:

RADICAL WC SL FIS iBox RACING

RADICAL WC SL FIS iBox RACING

World Cup SL ski designed for strong J4 and J3 athletes. Uses the same construction as the World Cup SL FIS ski with I-Box Composite Plate. Specific Slant Nose tip technology with asymmetrical tips improves swing weight and inertia. FIS powerful ski with softer plate for strong lighter weight athletes.
100% Racing
Recommended Binding: Axial² World Cup 120

 

Reference RA2AW02
Size Available 150

 

post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Yes.  There were actually U shaped brackets front and rear that mounted to the ski. The brass bits are the arms of them  There was then a pin that went through the plate to pickup the arms of the bracket so teh plate was almost fully floating

Seems like a horizontal version of the IQ system, where ski flexes under a fixed plate mounted with a single screw. 

post #52 of 52

ScotsSkier, Beyond, and Tog: I'd like to move the aspect of this thread that's all about my beer league ski choice to my beer league ski thread where it really belongs. That way this one can be, well, somewhat less fragmented, at least.

 

I really appreciate your input, and have tried to clarify some stuff in my latest post. Hope you'll take a look there. Thanks.

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