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oblivious boarders - Page 6

post #151 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by veteran View Post

 



.. as the pack of ravenous zombie snowboarders obliviously  ripped the flesh from the hapless skier ...

 

...  and stopped for an impromptu group picnic in the middle of the run, until disturbed by .......

post #152 of 164

... packs of Village Vigilantes armed to the teeth with torches, holy water and crucifixes ....

post #153 of 164

on their Machetes EDIT: Graphic Violence Rating !

post #154 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by veteran View Post

... packs of Village Vigilantes armed to the teeth with torches, holy water and crucifixes ....

Some Villagers are very peaceful .

post #155 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

Some Villagers are very peaceful .

Too peaceful. And too quiet.

post #156 of 164

the freshly fallen snow concealed the sound of approaching doom.

post #157 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post


For me (and I suspect many others) I give them extra extra extra room, at least 20 meters if I can manage it. However they are rare so I can slow down and stop turning to do that, if I did it for every skier/boarder I pass I wouldn't be able to get down the hill.

It's like driving on roads with no sidewalk and I see a pedestrian on the side, I will drive on the other side of the road to pass them, certainly isn't necessary, and not possible if there are too many of them (like ski around blind skiers).

 

In that case, I think you're going about the problem the wrong way. It's not the downhill skier who needs space; it's the uphill skier. The amount of space is determined by how much time the uphill skier needs in order to avoid a collision if something unexpected happens, like a crash or a sudden change of direction. So in that sense, you should be giving everyone the same amount of space regardless of whether it's a child or adult, expert or beginner, disabled skier or not, because it all comes down to how much time you need to react to a situation and take action.

 

The reason I mentioned blind skiers was to point out flawed thinking. A lot of people expect other skiers to somehow be completely aware of what's going on uphill while they are travelling downhill, as if we all have rearview mirrors or the ability to ski while constantly looking over both shoulders. This is why you sometimes hear people blaming downhill skiers/boarders for accidents or near misses. It's only when approaching blind skiers that such people take sole responsibility as the uphill skier to maintain a safe distance, which is something they really should be doing all the time. If everyone did this all the time, you'd never see any collisions.

post #158 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

In that case, I think you're going about the problem the wrong way. It's not the downhill skier who needs space; it's the uphill skier. The amount of space is determined by how much time the uphill skier needs in order to avoid a collision if something unexpected happens, like a crash or a sudden change of direction. So in that sense, you should be giving everyone the same amount of space regardless of whether it's a child or adult, expert or beginner, disabled skier or not, because it all comes down to how much time you need to react to a situation and take action.


in case of blind skiers, its both, at least from my pov. I certainly don't need that much space, but I would also not want to startle them by going too close. they already had it harder, don't need to make it even more so.
post #159 of 164

Really? No one yet....you must avoid the downhill person.

 

http://www.nsp.org/slopesafety/respcode.aspx

 

Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.

People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.

Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.

Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely

post #160 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

the freshly fallen snow concealed the sound of approaching doom.

Hundreds of crazed telemarkers, determined to restore purity to the slopes, steadily skinning, skinning, skinning .

post #161 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I've always noticed these people carrying on about being natives are never Native Americans..

 ...and tenth generation African Americans are still not welcome in places built by their ancestors...

post #162 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

Since this thread is a display of ignorance I'll respond to  T-Rod.   I enjoyed the sensations very much and the load on my knees was very gentle. The boots had me  dancing a jig.  I am buying some boots from the Burton rep and we'll see where this goes next year. The feeling of control is not there yet though I can turn well in both directions and am working on shaping my turns with less edging and a bit more skidding for turn shape control in tighter spaces. When I feel I have better control of turn shape it may be game on. Snowboarding is definitely fun . I can't wait for a skier to pompously declare my danger to society. Then I will be truly assimilated into the Brotherhood of Snowboarding. My biggest fear is getting AASI 1 and having to teach newbees because all of our snowboard instructors are riding the backside in the trees . One thing at a time

 

Like skiing, it's a very pleasant diversion. Nobody's said to my face that I'm dangerous, so you might be waiting a while for that to happen. :) Do not get AASI cert if you don't want to teach all day. If you want to teach all day, it could be a nice addition to your qualifications, but concentrate on developing skier clientele. They have the money.

post #163 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

the freshly fallen snow concealed the sound of approaching doom.

Hundreds of crazed telemarkers, determined to restore purity to the slopes, steadily skinning, skinning, skinning .


at first it was just a murmur then slowly the chant became more distinct - "investment opportunity"

post #164 of 164

...so they rebranded the High Altar to Ullr as a trauma park and watched the lemmings pay full price tickets ...

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