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Moving to Portland, OR - Seeking Info - Page 8

post #211 of 230
Thread Starter 

Ski clothes for the PNW (these post-season sales are calling my name)

  • Jackets:  if I wear a thin base layer, then another shirt, would I generally need a shell, a moderately insulated jacket, or a fully insulated jacket?  Or is it damp enough that shells don't usually come into play for those of us who get cold easily?
  • Pants:  are insulated pants ever really too much?

 

Please carry on with the sports banter too.  I'm looking forward to seeing some AAA baseball again.  When I lived near Richmond, I went to a few Braves games and loved the fact that for $15 I could sit close enough to be able to see pebbles of gravel, not just a brown band, around the perimeter of the field. 

post #212 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

Ski clothes for the PNW (these post-season sales are calling my name)

  • Jackets:  if I wear a thin base layer, then another shirt, would I generally need a shell, a moderately insulated jacket, or a fully insulated jacket?  Or is it damp enough that shells don't usually come into play for those of us who get cold easily?
  • Pants:  are insulated pants ever really too much?

 

Please carry on with the sports banter too.  I'm looking forward to seeing some AAA baseball again.  When I lived near Richmond, I went to a few Braves games and loved the fact that for $15 I could sit close enough to be able to see pebbles of gravel, not just a brown band, around the perimeter of the field. 

 

I'd say yes, you'll want something with a shell because the snow can be wet. Make it a waterproof/breathable one with a fairly high rating (e.g., 20,000/20,000  or higher) if you can. If you get cold easily then an insulated shell is nice but if you heat up they can be too warm. I prefer a lightly insulated shell plus a midlayer because the combo is relatively light, but a lot of people stick with an uninsulated shell on top of more underlayers because it's more versatile. At Bachelor I can park directly adjacent to the ski run so it's super easy for me to stop at my car and switch out my gear. 

 

I prefer insulated pants until the temps get 40F and above. It doesn't quite get Montana-cold here but it can get cold and I'd rather have my legs be too warm than too cold. Most pants have some vents to dump heat if you're too warm but you can't do much about it if you're too cold. Switching jacket layers during the ski day is relatively easy but switching pants -- not so easy.

 

I think having a high waterproof/breathable rating on pants is even more important than on your shell because your butt can get wet while sitting on the chairlift as your body heat melts the snow you're sitting on. I always go Gore-Tex or equivalent with pants.

post #213 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

 

I'd say yes, you'll want something with a shell because the snow can be wet. Make it a waterproof/breathable one with a fairly high rating (e.g., 20,000/20,000  or higher) if you can. If you get cold easily then an insulated shell is nice but if you heat up they can be too warm. I prefer a lightly insulated shell plus a midlayer because the combo is relatively light, but a lot of people stick with an uninsulated shell on top of more underlayers because it's more versatile. At Bachelor I can park directly adjacent to the ski run so it's super easy for me to stop at my car and switch out my gear. 

 

I prefer insulated pants until the temps get 40F and above. It doesn't quite get Montana-cold here but it can get cold and I'd rather have my legs be too warm than too cold. Most pants have some vents to dump heat if you're too warm but you can't do much about it if you're too cold. Switching jacket layers during the ski day is relatively easy but switching pants -- not so easy.

 

I think having a high waterproof/breathable rating on pants is even more important than on your shell because your butt can get wet while sitting on the chairlift as your body heat melts the snow you're sitting on. I always go Gore-Tex or equivalent with pants.


Pretty much echo the same sentiment. 20/20 shell is pretty much the best way to go. It doesn't often get bitterly cold on Hood. I think the coldest I skied in this year was like 19 degrees. But it does get wet on occasion. Proper layering to match the weather will make your days better, keep your goggles from fogging, and keep you dry.

 

I personally don't go for insulation on my pants. But I run pretty hot. I usually match my base layer to the temperature.

post #214 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

Ski clothes for the PNW (these post-season sales are calling my name)

  • Jackets:  if I wear a thin base layer, then another shirt, would I generally need a shell, a moderately insulated jacket, or a fully insulated jacket?  Or is it damp enough that shells don't usually come into play for those of us who get cold easily?
  • Pants:  are insulated pants ever really too much?

 

Please carry on with the sports banter too.  I'm looking forward to seeing some AAA baseball again.  When I lived near Richmond, I went to a few Braves games and loved the fact that for $15 I could sit close enough to be able to see pebbles of gravel, not just a brown band, around the perimeter of the field. 

 

I'd say yes, you'll want something with a shell because the snow can be wet. Make it a waterproof/breathable one with a fairly high rating (e.g., 20,000/20,000  or higher) if you can. If you get cold easily then an insulated shell is nice but if you heat up they can be too warm. I prefer a lightly insulated shell plus a midlayer because the combo is relatively light, but a lot of people stick with an uninsulated shell on top of more underlayers because it's more versatile. At Bachelor I can park directly adjacent to the ski run so it's super easy for me to stop at my car and switch out my gear. 

 

I prefer insulated pants until the temps get 40F and above. It doesn't quite get Montana-cold here but it can get cold and I'd rather have my legs be too warm than too cold. Most pants have some vents to dump heat if you're too warm but you can't do much about it if you're too cold. Switching jacket layers during the ski day is relatively easy but switching pants -- not so easy.

 

I think having a high waterproof/breathable rating on pants is even more important than on your shell because your butt can get wet while sitting on the chairlift as your body heat melts the snow you're sitting on. I always go Gore-Tex or equivalent with pants.

eek.gif A Skyliner local........Layers that's the way to go around here.

post #215 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

eek.gif A Skyliner local........Layers that's the way to go around here.

 

Whassup.

post #216 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

Ski clothes for the PNW (these post-season sales are calling my name)

  • Jackets:  if I wear a thin base layer, then another shirt, would I generally need a shell, a moderately insulated jacket, or a fully insulated jacket?  Or is it damp enough that shells don't usually come into play for those of us who get cold easily?
  • Pants:  are insulated pants ever really too much?

 

Please carry on with the sports banter too.  I'm looking forward to seeing some AAA baseball again.  When I lived near Richmond, I went to a few Braves games and loved the fact that for $15 I could sit close enough to be able to see pebbles of gravel, not just a brown band, around the perimeter of the field. 

Portland no longer has AAA baseball. They forced the Beavers to move when they renovated then PGE Park (now Jeld Wen Field) for the Timbers.  

post #217 of 230
Thread Starter 
thanks, SkiingCoug. I went back and read the whole article. Amazing how much that can change things.
post #218 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

Ski clothes for the PNW

I go insulated jacket and pants and 20k on the waterproofing. It is very windy a lot of the time so it magnifies the cold. Waterproofing is essential in PNW as you will get rain at bottom, snow at the top.
post #219 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post


as you will get rain at bottom, snow at the top.

 

PNW sounds like old age ... incontinence and white hair

post #220 of 230
Prepare for w-e-t. Insulated pants are good, but need to be waterproof/breathable. I ski in multiple layers of varying weights of polypropylene, with a waterproof/breathable shell (Arc'teryx) and insulated pants that are Columbia. They have vents for spring skiing that have come in handy. I have not found wind to be an issue but the potential is there if above the tree line. When I was growing up, we would buy "Bagners" at Ski Bowl - clear plastic bags with head and armholes to keep the rain off. When it snows, there can be a lot of it, and a lot of water content/closer to freezing than the Rockies. Luckily, Columbia Sportswear is based in PDX and has outlets and they now own Sorel and Mountain Hardwear, so some good deals to be had on good gear.
post #221 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

 

PNW sounds like old age ... incontinence and white hair


It is the skiing demographic.

post #222 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

 

PNW sounds like old age ... incontinence and white hair

 

Ha ha! Nice one. Rainy at the bottom, snowy on top, mashed potatoes in the middle.

 

One other thing to keep in mind when shopping for clothes is that in certain conditions the pulleys on the chairlifts sometimes shed grease. If you buy white or light-colored clothing they'll become speckled with brown grease spots that don't wash out real easily.

post #223 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlox View Post

I have not found wind to be an issue...

Vickieh will find wind an issue skiing at Hood.  The "Lonely Mountain" is a wind generator as is Bachelor.  The white topped volcanoes rise about the surrounding terrain.

post #224 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlox View Post

I have not found wind to be an issue...

Vickieh will find wind an issue skiing at Hood.  The "Lonely Mountain" is a wind generator as is Bachelor.  The white topped volcanoes rise about the surrounding terrain.

You're tons of fun and charming to boot. I'd bet good money that people move away from you at parties.
post #225 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post


It is the skiing demographic.
You must be part of a ski club.
post #226 of 230

Be prepared if your going to enjoy the Outdoors in PNW.  Look out for Ticks,Fleas,Blackberry Vines,Leaches,Posion Ivy/Oak,Hornest Nests,Stinging Needles,Large Carnivorous Animals,ect. Extinguish camp fires. Thank you.

post #227 of 230
Haha' I watched my first 2 episodes of Portlandia last night. Funny stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

One of my favorite Portlandia bits:


post #228 of 230

The Brunch Cutters episode with Tim Robbins is funny.

 


post #229 of 230
post #230 of 230

At least the water from the tap is palatable which is a lot more than I can say for many parts of the country. I've been watching the fluoride tizzy with interest from a safe distance.
 

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