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Stockli Laser SX vs Head i.Titan vs Blizzard Magnum? - Page 3

post #61 of 71

Hmmm. So I can increase dampness with a glued plate, at the cost of some loss of longitudinal flex. Which in the absence of a plate is somewhat compensated by a good elastic heel spring, anyway, I'd guess. 

 

I may have to try this in the summer with a pair of old skis. If I can find the appropriate gear to produce and measure resonance. What's the actual glue to use? 

post #62 of 71

The 3M Weatherstrip stuff dakine mentions works OK, is still relatively peelable by normal humans if you decide you do not like.  There are stronger barge cement/rubber cement/ neoprene contact type adhesives out there, pick whatever has reasonable duty temps.     

post #63 of 71

OK, thanks. Ah, a summer project to avoid real work. :D

post #64 of 71

Re; Glueing plates.................IME......................notsomuch.

 

In the last two weeks, we've had skis in our shop from top 10 racers at the recent US Nats, all of whom have WC or EC starts. None of them have glued plates. This is not to say that is isn't done on an individual basis or might not be done occasionally on a broader stroke but it is not a highly common practice.

 

Re: Rye vs. pumpernickel.............

 

Great analogy and go it another lick. I think of the very best ski laminations (Ie: micro-laminates) as being like a nice grilled cheese sammmich. Put your sourdough and swiss/cheddar combo together cold and it pretty much sticks together. Stick that baby in the pan @ 4 mins/side and it's different. After cooking, that GCS reacts like a micro laminate in a ski. The top layer and the bottom layer of toasted bread are stuck together by the viscous cheese but if you push on the top slice a little, you can get it to slide a little relative to the bottom slice. That's how a micro laminate works.

 

Hmmmmmm........gotta go make lunch..........:D

 

 

SJ

post #65 of 71

^^^^ I'm on a diet. So thanks for the visual; gotta go pretend my non-laminate yogurt is deeply appealing. :nono:

post #66 of 71

On the diet thing....I hear ya. Try the Tomato soup.....higher than yogurt on the comfort scale.

 

SJ

post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 


The old Derbyflexes had 2  ~5mm beads of  (butyl-based?) adhesive under them.       The quick and dirty way to get them off was to hammer a long thin screwdriver under the rubber,  then chuck it into a drill on the other side, squeeze the trigger and pull back under the plate.       Electricians' pliers on the handle side.

 

This trick also worked nicely on Vist WC plates and EPBS, not so much on the Blizzard semi-integrated plates from the Sigma era.


Nothing quite like true professional technique.

You could probably take the plate off in one whack if you froze the thing in liquid nitrogen to make it brittle.

Probably......

post #68 of 71

Ackshewallly........BITD when we did a lot of that stuff, the trick  was a bit of fine piano wire with a dowel handle on each end. Then ya slipped it under the forward edge of the DF plate and using the handles like a garrote, worked it toward the rear. It also worked famously on your business associates of Sicilian heritage.

 

SJ

post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

Stiffness is a combination of many things... You can have a non-metal ski like the Steadfast that will be very stiff ( tickness,construction, type of wood,...)...They can also play with the tickness of the metal layer: there is a difference between the 2012 fx serie ( 2 sheets of 3 mm thick) and the more recent ( 2x4 mm) or the mx serie (2x5 mm) and the rx serie (5+8 mm)... they can also cut the metal sheets  ( Prophet) or drill holes in them (I can not remember which ...)...

 

Just a note here. You  left out the decimal points on the metal layers. They would be 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8mm. A ski with 5mm + 8mm metal layers would truly be something. Bulletproof!

 

Question on the Stockli FIS race skis.  Slalom, GS. Do they make a layup for level beyond U-18? What do the college racers go to if on Stockli?

post #70 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

 

Just a note here. You  left out the decimal points on the metal layers. They would be 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8mm. A ski with 5mm + 8mm metal layers would truly be something. Bulletproof!

 

Question on the Stockli FIS race skis.  Slalom, GS. Do they make a layup for level beyond U-18? What do the college racers go to if on Stockli?

Oups! no more need for wood core with that much metal!:rolleyes

Can't answer your question...

post #71 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

 

Just a note here. You  left out the decimal points on the metal layers. They would be 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8mm. A ski with 5mm + 8mm metal layers would truly be something. Bulletproof!

 

Question on the Stockli FIS race skis.  Slalom, GS. Do they make a layup for level beyond U-18? What do the college racers go to if on Stockli?

 

The word that we get is.....no. This is unusual to be sure but that's what we are told. There are a couple of very high level skiers set to test out here and we have the test skis already. If there is any difference between these and the skis we had on the wall, we can't see it or feel it. When skiers at this level have tested with other brands in the past, the skis were noticeably different. There are almost certainly some different skis for WC but up to that level, apparently one production run of race skis.

 

SJ 

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