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tallest mountain New Hampshire?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I was driving up from Boston to Quebec the other weekend on the 91 and saw a fairly large mountain range still covered in a lot of snow? Is that White Mountain or Mt Washnington or something else? I'm presuming there's some decent ski areas around there this time of year if it's still covered?

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post #2 of 16

Mt Washington is the tallest mountain in NH (actually the highest in the Northeast @ 6,288'), which is in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains.

post #3 of 16

91 is in VT and seeing Mt. Washington from it might be difficult.  Where you on 93?

post #4 of 16

Most of our ski areas are closing this weekend for the usual reason-lack of customers. Wildcat, which is directly across Pinkham Notch from Mt. Washington (great view) may stay open longer. Otherwise you can walk up Mt Washington and ski Tuckerman's Ravine.

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

91 is in VT and seeing Mt. Washington from it might be difficult.  Where you on 93?

If you were driving up I93 you'd have seen Mt Lafayette and the Franconia Ridge. They're snow capped this time of the year. The road passes between these and Cannon Mtn. but you'd likely have seen Cannon Mtn ski area close to the road.

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

91 is in VT and seeing Mt. Washington from it might be difficult.  Where you on 93?

 

Seeing Mt. Washington from either 91 or 93 is going to be a stretch.  Washington is way over near the Maine border on Rt. 16.  You can't even see Washington from Cannon Mountain due to it being blocked by the Franconia Ridge.

 

Not sure what you'd have seen from 91...  From 93, the most dramatic set of peaks you'll see is the Franconia Ridge, which usually stays snow capped quite a while into spring.  That's Mt. Flume, Mt. Liberty, Haystack (minor peak), Mt. Lincoln and Mt. Lafayette being the highest peak in that ridge (5,260 feet).  You'd kind of "know it" if you were in that stretch as 93 narrows down to one-lane-each-way when you're in the notch (i.e., you're looking straight up to see the tops of those).

 

So, OP, whereabouts on 91 (or 93, as the case may be) were you?

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

91 is in VT and seeing Mt. Washington from it might be difficult.  Where you on 93?

yep, must have been, not long before reaching the border. I mixed up the 91 and the 93.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

Most of our ski areas are closing this weekend for the usual reason-lack of customers. Wildcat, which is directly across Pinkham Notch from Mt. Washington (great view) may stay open longer. Otherwise you can walk up Mt Washington and ski Tuckerman's Ravine.

so, no ski lifts? :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

If you were driving up I93 you'd have seen Mt Lafayette and the Franconia Ridge. They're snow capped this time of the year. The road passes between these and Cannon Mtn. but you'd likely have seen Cannon Mtn ski area close to the road.

yep, saw Cannon Mtn, looked like a pretty small place from the road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 

Seeing Mt. Washington from either 91 or 93 is going to be a stretch.  Washington is way over near the Maine border on Rt. 16.  You can't even see Washington from Cannon Mountain due to it being blocked by the Franconia Ridge.

 

Not sure what you'd have seen from 91...  From 93, the most dramatic set of peaks you'll see is the Franconia Ridge, which usually stays snow capped quite a while into spring.  That's Mt. Flume, Mt. Liberty, Haystack (minor peak), Mt. Lincoln and Mt. Lafayette being the highest peak in that ridge (5,260 feet).  You'd kind of "know it" if you were in that stretch as 93 narrows down to one-lane-each-way when you're in the notch (i.e., you're looking straight up to see the tops of those).

 

So, OP, whereabouts on 91 (or 93, as the case may be) were you?

yep, must be Franconia Ridge then? Any small resorts round there is is it all touring territory? I uess Jay Peak is still closer to Montreal though.

post #8 of 16

What you can see of Cannon Mountain from the road isn't the whole thing; it's a decent sized area:  http://www.cannonmt.com/.

 

What most people "see" of Cannon is the five trails dropping to the road, but that's far from the whole place.

 

Some guy by the name of Bode Miller grew up skiing there...

 

There are a bunch of other ski areas in those mountains.  Loon is a bit to the south.  Most of the White Mountain ski areas are nearer to the Maine side though (Attitash, Wildcat, Black Mountain, Cranmore).

 

A lot of the mountains in New Hampshire get skied; you just have to hike for your turns on many of them.  Mt. Washington's Tuckerman Ravine is the most famous spot, but far from the only one.

post #9 of 16

you can see mountain washington easily from 91 near saint johnsbury......

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

you can see mountain washington easily from 91 near saint johnsbury......

 

I guess it makes sense that the line of sight works from there.  Does Mt. Washington look like much from St. Johnsbury or is it just a smudge on the horizon at that point?

 

If the OP was "near the border", then he was probably near St. Johnsbury...  Lafayette and Cannon are a good 30+ miles south at that point.

post #11 of 16

If he's driving from Boston to Quebec, he would be on 93, which dead ends at St Johnsbury and becomes 91.

 

That would be Franconia range he went right by, the mountain comes up straight from the road. 

 

Kevin was right. 

 

Actually, I'd be curious as to how much longer Wildcat will still be open. I might be going up to the southern Whites the next 2 weekends for a day of white water each. Could easily skip over to the Cat for a bit of spring skiing, provided they continue to spin their lifts.  

post #12 of 16

The Presidential Range is very easily visible from the stretch of 91 in the NEK just above the merge with 93. If you take Route 2 from Montpelier across to St J, it stares you directly in the face for miles. However, if you are traveling North on 93 or 91, both highways angle northwest, which is away from the Pres. Range, so it wouldn't be directly in your face, but it would be easily visible if you're looking for it. 

 

I think the virtues of Mt Washington and Tuckerman's Ravine have been seriously understated. Tuckerman's is legendary for the blindingly massive amount of snow it gets, and how long it lingers in the springtime. Tuckerman's is a glacial circque, and due to its orientation and the extreme winds that hit Mt. Washington (Mt Washington is the windiest place on earth), Tuckerman's get's a huge amount of snow... think about 50+ feet in the base of the ravine at the height of the season. That, and the 45-50 degree lines that come off the headwall make Tuckerman's the most popular backcountry skiing spot in the country. (For you Westerners, can you name a single spot that gets more visits than Tucks? didn't think so).

 

Due to the massive amount of snow Tuck's gets, people typically don't even start skiing it until March, since the avalanche danger is too high midwinter. April and May are the best times to ski Tucks, and its routine to be able to ski Tuck's until the Fourth of July.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
Due to the massive amount of snow Tuck's gets, people typically don't even start skiing it until March, since the avalanche danger is too high midwinter.

Because March onwards melts some of the layers making it bond better?

post #14 of 16
Freeskier I think loveland pass over the course of the year probably gets more people than tucks....
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post

Because March onwards melts some of the layers making it bond better?

Most people would find winter conditions wretched, not that there aren't some great days. Think high winds, cold, snow that may be ice, crust, wind slab. By early Spring snow in the Ravine itself is frozen into a very solid mass with maybe some new snow on top. Usually it is not until warmer Spring weather appears that the underlying frozen mass produces some wonderful corn snow on the surface. Often rain actually helps by stripping away the mush that tends to accumulate.

 

Here's a link to the current summit conditions:

http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

post #16 of 16

Re: Tuckerman's Ravine (see above); here is a link to the avalanche center for current conditions:

http://www.mountwashingtonavalanchecenter.org/

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