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Technical Free Skiing Videos - Page 17

post #481 of 495
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NECoach View Post

 

To put it another way. Is Heluva intentionally using his very bent inside leg to remove pressure from the extended and stacked outside leg?

 

No. That's a recipe for a hip check or a high side... neither of which are fun at 35-45mph.

post #482 of 495
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdgeByter View Post

Heluva's video is the closest I've seen to how I think I'm skiing. Maybe not in every detail but certainly how I move around groomed slopes at times.

 

I learned a long time ago that it is unwise to look at a skier and say "that is how I look when I ski" unless you actually have verified that you indeed look like that skier. Those who have not spent a significant amount of time doing self MA are usually pretty shocked at what they see when they are finally filmed. Generally, perception is quite far from reality. Why do you think NCAA D1 teams film AND time every practice run?

post #483 of 495
Thread Starter 

To those who keep harping on turn shape and variation... The turns are actually made on 4 distinctly different pairs of skis: 27m GS ski, 12.5m SL ski, 17.5m all mountain ski, 15m all mountain ski. I haven't brought this up yet, but the radii skied with each ski is pretty much the tightest arc I can get the skis to make given the speed, terrain, and snow surface. In the carving-specific clips there are turns based on GS, SL, and short swing turns (I call them instructor turns). Add in the short tun clip made as a result of the "versatility" criticisms, and there are quite a lot of different turn shapes, radii, and types shown.

 

To put the GS turns in perspective; they are much tighter than a typical 27m set... probably closer to a 20m turn. Although I've never measured my tracks with a range finder, I have skied plenty of 23m-27m sets that were set with a range finder, so I have some basis for comparison. This applies to all of the turns... they are all much tighter than the natural radius of the ski, and much tighter than anyone I've ever skied with can arc a ski of comparable radius. Some here who have skied with me can attest to this.

 

Based on experience, I'm of the opinion that using the ski to tighten the radius is far a more challenging task than "varying" a turn shape/size/speed by adding or subtracting pivoting and pushing. Watching a skier make a 25m GS turn on a 17m all mountain ski while the ski is engaging and releasing throughout the whole turn, is not impressive to me. Watching the same skier then tighten their turns, not by engaging the skis, but rather by pivoting or pushing the skis [to me] is equally less impressive.

 

Each to his own I suppose... but those who mentioned that I am a skier who doesn't understand how they ski would be wrong. I am often skeptical of those who cannot "do" [or have no measurable proof that they "can do"; this being the internet and all] but can always tell everyone, with certainty, "how to do it". When the "do-er" contradicts this kind of person, the response is always "well, you just don't understand what you're doing".

 

Thanks again to those who find value in these videos. For me, that makes the effort involved in gathering the footage and compiling it, worth while.

 

Cheers.

post #484 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

To those who keep harping on turn shape and variation... The turns are actually made on 4 distinctly different pairs of skis: 27m GS ski, 12.5m SL ski, 17.5m all mountain ski, 15m all mountain ski. I haven't brought this up yet, but the radii skied with each ski is pretty much the tightest arc I can get the skis to make given the speed, terrain, and snow surface. In the carving-specific clips there are turns based on GS, SL, and short swing turns (I call them instructor turns). Add in the short tun clip made as a result of the "versatility" criticisms, and there are quite a lot of different turn shapes, radii, and types shown.

 

To put the GS turns in perspective; they are much tighter than a typical 27m set... probably closer to a 20m turn. Although I've never measured my tracks with a range finder, I have skied plenty of 23m-27m sets that were set with a range finder, so I have some basis for comparison. This applies to all of the turns... they are all much tighter than the natural radius of the ski, and much tighter than anyone I've ever skied with can arc a ski of comparable radius. Some here who have skied with me can attest to this.

 

Based on experience, I'm of the opinion that using the ski to tighten the radius is far a more challenging task than "varying" a turn shape/size/speed by adding or subtracting pivoting and pushing. Watching a skier make a 25m GS turn on a 17m all mountain ski while the ski is engaging and releasing throughout the whole turn, is not impressive to me. Watching the same skier then tighten their turns, not by engaging the skis, but rather by pivoting or pushing the skis [to me] is equally less impressive.

 

Each to his own I suppose... but those who mentioned that I am a skier who doesn't understand how they ski would be wrong. I am often skeptical of those who cannot "do" [or have no measurable proof that they "can do"; this being the internet and all] but can always tell everyone, with certainty, "how to do it". When the "do-er" contradicts this kind of person, the response is always "well, you just don't understand what you're doing".

 

Thanks again to those who find value in these videos. For me, that makes the effort involved in gathering the footage and compiling it, worth while.

 

Cheers.

That's quite a statement...
anyway, the short turn video is much better than the others. your skiing looks more fluid even if i still think its a bit rigid from the waist up (but that's personal preference i guess)
your right arm is lazy tho, not as much movement during pole plants as the left and it often hangs on the side.
waist done is solid, not much to be said about it.

post #485 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

That's quite a statement...
anyway, the short turn video is much better than the others. your skiing looks more fluid even if i still think its a bit rigid from the waist up (but that's personal preference i guess)
your right arm is lazy tho, not as much movement during pole plants as the left and it often hangs on the side.
waist done is solid, not much to be said about it.

Heluva

To my mind great skiing. I liked all your videos and thought you were very fluid in all of them. I did especially appreciate the short turn video and around 2:35 I counted 15 turns in about 9 seconds. That's 0.6 seconds per carved turn.

 

Since when is a "quiet" upper body "rigid". I see it as a sign of good A&E. I also liked the distance you keep your skis apart in the moguls. I think I only saw one real pole plant in the entire video. I'm not critsizing that, as long as you can get away with it, and don't fall, but I think you are going to need pole plants in steeper moguls that you just can't cruise through. As Jzamp says you do seem to hold your right arm a little straighter at the elbow and with the right hand lower. I don't see a problem with that though. Are the taps you make with the poles a timing device for the turns? I don't usually do that skiing the groomed slopes so I wonder what your purpose is.

 

Unfortunately the season is essentially over here, but I'll remember 0.6 seconds when I try to time how fast I can make quick carved turns. I suspect it is quite a bit faster because there is no way I can use my poles as fast as I can make snake like carved turns with my skis, but then those quick turns don't go as wide as yours do. Essentially my head stays pretty close to a downhill line and my skis whip back and forth under me as fast as I can throw my knees side to side to change edges. No back and forth and little ski to ski weight shifting to slow me down.

 

Again, do you ever boot-out using high edge angles (like you do--especially when using your narrow slalom skis)? If not, do you do anything special to prevent it. I fell twice this year from boot-out but there were many more times I could feel the boot buckles scraping or hanging up on the snow but managed to recover before falling.

 

Have you tried Ligety Circles? If you can do them, then you can legitimately tell other skiers that you could ski circles around them.


Edited by EdgeByter - 5/20/13 at 11:55pm
post #486 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdgeByter View Post

 

Unfortunately the season is essentially over here, but I'll remember 0.6 seconds when I try to time how fast I can make quick carved turns. I suspect it is quite a bit faster because there is no way I can use my poles as fast as I can make snake like carved turns with my skis, but then those quick turns don't go as wide as yours do. Essentially my head stays pretty close to a downhill line and my skis whip back and forth under me as fast as I can throw my knees side to side to change edges. No back and forth and little ski to ski weight shifting to slow me down.

    So your skis are equally weighted when you ski--off of your tails, no less???

 

     zenny

post #487 of 495

It has been suggested that we separate this into two threads starting at post 487 and name the off-shoot thread EdgeByter's Tail Carving Technique.

 

Given the thread has diverged from the Technical Free Skiing Videos subject, I'm inclined to agree.  We can re-merge the threads or individual posts if this is a problem.  Please communicate any objections to me by PM rather than post in the thread.  If you feel any of the posts should be returned to this Technical Free Skiing Video thread, please let me know by PM and provide the post number and author.

post #488 of 495

I know I'm coming late to the party here, but I just saw the videos and wanted to add my 2 cents about the first one (GS turns).

 

So: this is beautiful skiing.  The combination of power, balance, athleticism, and control brought a smile to my face.  Essentially, you're dominating those blue runs.  I think I saw mostly C-shaped, rather than comma-shaped, turns, but that could have been a choice on your part, as both are entirely functional for the skiing you were doing there.  The pole plants do seem a bit passive (especially the right one = viewer's left) -- I didn't see much active reach compared to what I've seen from most WC racers freeskiing on similar terrain.  Also, I wonder if you might to want to start your turns with more whole-body inclination before you progress to hip angulation, which I'm guessing might help change them from C-turns to comma-turns (http://youcanski.com/en/coaching/incline-to-win.htm).  But broadly speaking, I should leave technique recommendations to the professional coaches here.  Instead, I'd like to offer a general comment:

 

For an optimum MA, it's best to see two things -- what you can do, and what you can't.  The first video you posted is useful because it clearly shows the former.  But to complete the picture, I think it would be helpful to see you making GS turns under much more challenging conditions, which would reveal any weaknesses you might have in much greater clarity and detail.  In particular, I think it would be great if, this upcoming season, you could post a video of yourself making GS turns on a steep, icy face -- ideally, in a steep section of a well-prepared and challenging Masters' GS course with unevenly-spaced gates, where you'd want to make comma-turns to preserve speed and avoid skidding.  The steepness would also enable us to see your more strongly cross-over-type turns; it appears the turns in the current video, while combining both cross-over and cross-under, are more strongly cross-under in character, I'm guessing because of the shallower terrain. 

 

And since this thread is so long, if you decide to create and share that new video, you might want to start a new thread, in which the new video is posted alongside the current one.

 

I hope I've been helpful.


Edited by chemist - 10/14/13 at 5:41pm
post #489 of 495

Okay.  Freeskiing?

post #490 of 495
Really Jacque?
post #491 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Really Jacque?


Freeskiing!

post #492 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Freeskiing!

 

 

no, just poor video

post #493 of 495

   Well chemist, I'm not sure that you've read this entire thread or not--if you had you would've noticed that it was at times, rather ummmm....contentious :rolleyes. Perhaps it's best we just let sleeping dogs lie here, if you take my meaning....

 

    zenny

post #494 of 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Freeskiing!

 

 

no, just poor video


Don't be a stick in the mud.  Have you ever heard of "Levity" ?   My mother taught me not to be like you here.  Lighten up!  Have some fun.  Hey, maybe even post your "good" video!

post #495 of 495

Really?  17 pages? 

 

First off, it takes some balls to post video of yourself skiing.  Secondly, if you ask for feedback you can bet you'll get it.  ....grain of salt....

 

Intent is a big part of skiing.  Maybe that's why some people feel like they are ripping and others watch in dismay.  I think it is clear what Heluva's intent is with his skiing and he accomplished his goals pretty well. Also, the terrain in many ways will dictate your intentions.  I mean, what are you gonna do, pivot slip down the same groomer everyday?  No, you are going to tip 'em and rip 'em.   With new intentions and terrain, however, will come new moves.  Not entirely new moves, just subtle differences in things discussed, edging, pressure, flexing AND extending, counter, etc. 

 

If Helevu quit his job and moved out west for a season his skiing would change dramatically.  That is, if his intent also changed.

 

My two pennies.

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