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Would you ever quit skiing? - Page 4

Poll Results: Would you ever consider quitting skiing and under what circumstances?

Poll expired: Apr 16, 2013 This is a multiple choice poll
  • 60% of voters (49)
    Never under any circumstances short of death would I ever consider quitting skiing.
  • 6% of voters (5)
    I would consider quitting skiing if I got too old to ski anything but blue groomers.
  • 9% of voters (8)
    I would consider quitting skiing if I was badly injured and couldn't ski anything but blue groomers.
  • 2% of voters (2)
    I would consider quitting skiing if my partner/ski buddy quit.
  • 24% of voters (20)
    I would consider quitting skiing for another reason (please explain)
81 Total Votes  
post #91 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

When all I can ski is blue groomers I'll call it a life and move on to fishing and other past times.  Might go out once in while with my girls assuming they still will have me but I've got no interest in cruising groomers on regular basis.  I guess it depends on what you call "Quitting".  I ski ~60-70 days per year and anything less than 10 days would be quitting in my book.  It would be like going to the movies or visiting the museum.   It would become something you do every now and again instead of a way of life...that's what a I consider quitting.  So maybe I should have voted no I'll never quit.

That was a funny stream of consciousness. But I know just what you mean. 

 

I don't know what I'll do, it depends on a lot of things. I agree with UGA that I wouldn't ski as much, but I don't picture quitting completely unless it is wholly necessary. 

 

I have a kind of similar thing with tennis -- I used to play several times a week, but I have a painful foot, and it makes it really tough to play well, consistently. It often ends up being more frustrating than anything. So I haven't played much tennis lately.

 

It's hard to compare playing an hour or two of tennis with spending a day skiing, though, on so many levels. Especially if it's an indoor tennis court, or it's hot outside. I don't like heat, and the draw of being outdoors is lost on an indoor court. At least with skiing I can still go out in a brisk wind on a mountain ... even if I'm just riding the lift around and around, I think that would make me pretty happy. :-)

post #92 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebag View Post

Coming of a knee injury that required three surgeries, I have found a new lease on skiing by shortening up my skis.

 

 

Good move. I dialed my equipment back after struggling with back issues the last few years. It felt great to not have to push my skis so much to get them to work. My body thanked me! I should have done it sooner but my ego didn't even realize it was an option.

post #93 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Would you continue skiing if you weren't able to ski like you are now? For instance, when you get older or get injured and can't ski the rad lines you do now, do you think you'd continue skiing even if you're only able to get down blue groomers or is that prospect too boring to contemplate? 

 

As I near the sunset years it's a question that occurs to me often, especially as I see my older friends having to dial back. Can I be satisfied with less thrills, or will the thrill-theshold keep sinking incrementally lower so that I don't notice that my experience is any less exciting?

 

I'm bumping up against the old thing and plan to continue to look for ways to up the thrill threshold until I can't push it no more. I'll worry about what comes next when I can't push it no more or until I can't keep up with the grand kids or something.

post #94 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


That's a repugnant statement. totally ignores the twists and turns in life. and people, quit bragging about what is essentially genetics. it's as self absorbed as saying: I'm just so pretty. (I'm just so fit.)

while I totally appreciate black diamond curmudgeon-itude, and the point that sometimes things are out of our/your hands. We do make choices, many of which either do or don;t contribute to using potential within us.

While I don;t take Nolo's statement as repugnant or self-absorbed, I do appreciate that along the way, choice is sometimes taken away from us, and genetics conspires to foil our intent. But hey, whatz that sayin ? 'Shit Happens!'

Since the geezers are dominating this thread, I wonder if there are the younguns reading and taking note ??

But back to the topic. Everyone has their circumstance, and choices are made. There is no podium or medal at the end result of these choices, just how one spends their time and energy. A very personal thing. 

Not being noted for my far-sighted planning; I think I've now accummulated enough newer equipment to hold me for the next 25 yrs or so... I guess I better make some use of it.

now ask me if I could give up Golf ... (given I don; tthink I'm actually playin golf... ;-)

post #95 of 112

Well, if I ever quit skiing, I'll come to EpicSki to live vicariously through the rest of you!

post #96 of 112

Cold dead hands for me.  

 

Frank Walter is my hero.  He turned 90 this ski season and Copper Mountain threw a party for him on opening day. He has skied over 100 days/year at Copper for decades.  I love seeing him on the hill and am occaisionally lucky enough to catch a chair with him.

 

Last ski season, he racked up 2.2 million vertical feet in 159 days; his high a few years back was little over 7 million.  "Franks Fav" is the run at Copper they named after him, and he's been featured in a Warren Miller movie.  

 

See him ski in this video from last November.  This is some of the most dangerous skiing in Colorado.  I'm way to chicken to ski on opening day.  Everybody in the state is skiing on three or four runs (one at each open ski area) with all ability levels combined.   Crazy stuff.

 

 

More about Frank here:

http://www.theskichannel.com/blogs/20111115/first-chair-first-run-at-copper-with-frank-walter-the-guy-in-the-yellow-jacket-who-skis-every-day/

post #97 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom View Post

If the choice is my spouse and I ski blue groomers together into the sunset, then I would rather hang 'em up and go snowshoeing. At least you're in the wilderness and not fighting crowds and the suburban virus that is trying to infect so much of ski country.

 

 

 

 

Yes!

 

How do these ridiculous people dare to come to our resorts and ruin our snow with their pathetic skidded turns. Bringing their money, buying gear and lessons and lift tickets. Clogging up our roads, eating in our restaurants, sleeping in our hotels. Who the hell do they think they are? Just stay home and leave the mountain to those of us who truly deserve it.

post #98 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebag View Post

 

 

Yes!

 

How do these ridiculous people dare to come to our resorts and ruin our snow with their pathetic skidded turns. Bringing their money, buying gear and lessons and lift tickets. Clogging up our roads, eating in our restaurants, sleeping in our hotels. Who the hell do they think they are? Just stay home and leave the mountain to those of us who truly deserve it.

 

Hahah!  Awesome.

post #99 of 112
This is a fascinating thread as it deals with personal attitudes about the aging process, recreation, life choices, life, the universe, everything.

I loved reading the variations of personal beliefs as well as the realities of this stage of life. Thanks Nolo for starting this thread and to everyone who posted.

I already quit skiing once, or rather neglected, an activity that has become very important to me. I don't intend to quit again. I'll take blues and greens. I say that now, anyway. Wait till a few things change medically and physically.

I have several times thought about what I would do if I went blind, or lost a leg, or was paralyzed. Certainly there is adaptive equipment and support; this does require other people to help. I was trying to visualize what it would be like to drive to the mountain on my own, somehow carry my gear from the parking lot, get onto the chairlift line, with one leg. A sit ski even more complicated. It would require friends and community to ski. Could I make it to a Gathering? The simplicity and freedom I enjoy now, of being able to load a couple pairs of skis in the Yakima box and boots and backpack in the Subie and just go, would not be so simple. In order for me to ski, others would need to schedule their lives around my desire to ski. Not sure how I feel a out that.

So I can talk now all I want about till death do part me from my quiver. The reality of my circumstances may change my mind.
post #100 of 112

On my way back from the last ski trip of the season. My friend and I who have been doing ski trips together for over 30 years discuss this topic periodically. At least for now, we intend to keep sking, Even if it ultimately turns to just sking blue groomers. I suspect it will still be fun getting outside and having the sensations of speed and control that you get with sking. Even if it's not deep powder runs. Of course, we also discuss the possibility of  life's surprises, which aren't always good, and which you can't anticipate. In the meantime, all you can do is try to stay in decent enough shape to delay those nasty surprises.  

post #101 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Fight it, people. Get fit, lift weights, get anaerobic several times a week, eat a healthy diet, get enough sleep, do something that raises your endorphins every day...Yep, every day!

 

All that and a bottle of Alleve is how I am approaching the abyss. I hate telling people my age so I won't, but I am in better shape today than I was 10 years ago. There's a story in the latest issue of Outside Montana magazine about an 80 year old triathlete. Or the lady who recently celebrated her 90th birthday by skydiving. That's what I'm talking about!

Mind, body and soul.......

Physical conditioning is such a vital part of keeping at it but I'm embarrassed to say I'm not as fit as I was when I worked construction, but I'm finding myself in a better mental place than I was a few years ago and I think that goes a long way towards skiing longer into my years. 

 

I voted 

 

 

Quote:

I would consider quitting skiing if I got too old to ski anything but blue groomers.

 

To clarify, I doubt that being relegated to blue groomers would detour me from skiing, but if I were old and feeble enough to be stuck on blue groomers, I'd imagine that I'd also be skiing in a manner that may be a safety risk to myself and others.  My biggest concern would be if I were a risk to the safety of my fellow skiers. 

post #102 of 112

Think is all about perspective. I love being in the mountains. They always calm me down. I cannot imagine not getting up in them. But skiing for me has also been connected to my ego. I still will take it as a bit of a challenge if I see anyone go past me who seems to be either quicker or has more finesse. The trick is to remember there is always a younger faster skier and not let it bother you. When the skills decline, if your body still is willing, and you still can enjoy moments of pure bliss, why ever stop. Skiing triple blacks, blues, greens or getting a magic carpet ticket is really irrelevant.   

post #103 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

My folks skied into their 80's out at Buttermilk. Buttermilk has a large cadre of old timers, some of them pretty famous like Klaus and Pete Siebert, primarily because of the blue groomers. 

I don't think a single one would say they weren't having fun skiing relatively easy groomers.

 

Anyone that thinks their last day will be on expert runs, is probably already suffering from dementia.

roflmao.gif

post #104 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 but if I were old and feeble enough to be stuck on blue groomers, I'd imagine that I'd also be skiing in a manner that may be a safety risk to myself and others

I think this thread reveals more about our fears about getting old than the reality of being old. (Speaking as someone a lot older than you. biggrin.gif) First, old doesn't equal feeble. Know some 80 year olds who run Masters just fine, thanks. Second, being on a blue groomer doesn't equal stuck. I know a bunch of folks who are on blue groomers, and some are young, some very old, some are just terminal intermediates who don't like to push themselves anymore but want the joy of gliding along in the white. In all honesty, the young intermediates scare me waaay more than the oldest guys. Who usually were petty good skiers, age and wear/tear has caught up with them, but they love it, so they stick with it. Just within their current capabilities. Ditto for the terminal I middle agers, who have always known their limits. So these guys are not the dangers to us out there. The idiot 19 year olds who think they're immortal and incapable of making mistakes are.

 

Put another way, you don't automatically become a hazard to yourself and others when you hit retirement. Or whatever "old" means to each of us. And older folks IME don't necessarily see dialing back as being stuck; it's just a fact of life, like realizing one day you can't see without glasses, or that your sprain takes two months to heal instead of two weeks, or that you can't party till 4 am and run out the door three hours later, like you did in college.

post #105 of 112

I don't see any reason to stop skiing ever. I would lap green trails just for the sake of being outside in the winter, I never really cared about how good or fast I want to progress. Skiing to me is mostly about being outside and enjoying nature, although I'll get rad and ski the deep while I'm still physically able.

 

My dads coming up on 70 in a couple years, still gets it done 60ish days each year, never missing a powder day. I want to be like him when i grow up....

post #106 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I think this thread reveals more about our fears about getting old than the reality of being old. (Speaking as someone a lot older than you. biggrin.gif) First, old doesn't equal feeble. Know some 80 year olds who run Masters just fine, thanks. Second, being on a blue groomer doesn't equal stuck. I know a bunch of folks who are on blue groomers, and some are young, some very old, some are just terminal intermediates who don't like to push themselves anymore but want the joy of gliding along in the white. In all honesty, the young intermediates scare me waaay more than the oldest guys. Who usually were petty good skiers, age and wear/tear has caught up with them, but they love it, so they stick with it. Just within their current capabilities. Ditto for the terminal I middle agers, who have always known their limits. So these guys are not the dangers to us out there. The idiot 19 year olds who think they're immortal and incapable of making mistakes are.

 

Put another way, you don't automatically become a hazard to yourself and others when you hit retirement. Or whatever "old" means to each of us. And older folks IME don't necessarily see dialing back as being stuck; it's just a fact of life, like realizing one day you can't see without glasses, or that your sprain takes two months to heal instead of two weeks, or that you can't party till 4 am and run out the door three hours later, like you did in college.

I think "Old" is a relative term.  I certainly don't think of retirement age as "Old". 

Example:  When my grandpa died in 1998, my grandma sold their house in Florida because "All those people down there are old".  She took the money from selling the house to buy herself a John Deere tractor with a rototiller, snow blower and big mower deck so it would be easier to keep up her property in Michigan, which has 2 ponds, a creek, a barn, grove, huge garden and sizable house.  She was 90, well past retirement age, before it became necessary for her to give up her tractor and guns (Yes, grandma is a hunter too).  

 

I'm going to drive my John Deere tractor until doing so is a risk to myself and others just like grandma did. biggrin.gif

post #107 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I think this thread reveals more about our fears about getting old than the reality of being old. (Speaking as someone a lot older than you. biggrin.gif) First, old doesn't equal feeble. Know some 80 year olds who run Masters just fine, thanks. Second, being on a blue groomer doesn't equal stuck. I know a bunch of folks who are on blue groomers, and some are young, some very old, some are just terminal intermediates who don't like to push themselves anymore but want the joy of gliding along in the white. In all honesty, the young intermediates scare me waaay more than the oldest guys. Who usually were petty good skiers, age and wear/tear has caught up with them, but they love it, so they stick with it. Just within their current capabilities. Ditto for the terminal I middle agers, who have always known their limits. So these guys are not the dangers to us out there. The idiot 19 year olds who think they're immortal and incapable of making mistakes are.

 

Put another way, you don't automatically become a hazard to yourself and others when you hit retirement. Or whatever "old" means to each of us. And older folks IME don't necessarily see dialing back as being stuck; it's just a fact of life, like realizing one day you can't see without glasses, or that your sprain takes two months to heal instead of two weeks, or that you can't party till 4 am and run out the door three hours later, like you did in college.

I think "Old" is a relative term.  I certainly don't think of retirement age as "Old". 

Example:  When my grandpa died in 1998, my grandma sold their house in Florida because "All those people down there are old".  She took the money from selling the house to buy herself a John Deere tractor with a rototiller, snow blower and big mower deck so it would be easier to keep up her property in Michigan, which has 2 ponds, a creek, a barn, grove, huge garden and sizable house.  She was 90, well past retirement age, before it became necessary for her to give up her tractor and guns (Yes, grandma is a hunter too).  

 

I'm going to drive my John Deere tractor until doing so is a risk to myself and others just like grandma did. biggrin.gif

What?  Did those old muzzle loaders with the hexagonal barrels get too heavy for her?  She could have traded them in for lighter weapons you know, maybe a lever action Winchester.  Or did she not hold with the new technology. wink.gif

post #108 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

What?  Did those old muzzle loaders with the hexagonal barrels get too heavy for her?  She could have traded them in for lighter weapons you know, maybe a lever action Winchester.  Or did she not hold with the new technology. wink.gif

Oh, she had one of those, too!

My dad gave her a pellet gun as a consolation prize so she could still shoot the vermin that invaded her property, but she wasn't happy about it at all! 

 

She's still alive, but she's not always with us. frown.gif

This picture just 4 years ago playing fetch with my dog by one of her ponds. 

post #109 of 112
Thread Starter 

A while ago a friend posed this question when we were playing a round of golf. If you had to lose something physically, what's the worst thing you can imagine losing? I thought of the obvious choices -- sight, hearing, taste, touch, speech -- and picked sight. She said, I think the worst would be if I couldn't move. I had to agree with her. I can get around in the dark pretty well, but I would hate to be motionless.

 

Changing up the question a bit: If you had to give up one of your sports hobbies, what would be the one you would miss the most? For me there's no question what answer I'd give: SKIING! My other sports hobbies are golf, hiking, swimming, waterskiing, sailing/windsurfing, and an occasional game of tennis. I like doing these things but I need to ski. Skiing is why I work out every day, not golf, not swimming, not hiking. The other sports are what I do sometimes, but skiing is who I am. 

post #110 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

A while ago a friend posed this question when we were playing a round of golf. If you had to lose something physically, what's the worst thing you can imagine losing? I thought of the obvious choices -- sight, hearing, taste, touch, speech -- and picked sight. She said, I think the worst would be if I couldn't move. I had to agree with her. I can get around in the dark pretty well, but I would hate to be motionless.

 

Changing up the question a bit: If you had to give up one of your sports hobbies, what would be the one you would miss the most? For me there's no question what answer I'd give: SKIING! My other sports hobbies are golf, hiking, swimming, waterskiing, sailing/windsurfing, and an occasional game of tennis. I like doing these things but I need to ski. Skiing is why I work out every day, not golf, not swimming, not hiking. The other sports are what I do sometimes, but skiing is who I am. 

 

Interesting. I was occasionally party - directly or indirectly - to some of your informal coaching last month when we were at the Gathering. One of the things that struck me was that you often made a gentle point of incorporating principles and perspectives from the non-skiing and even non-athletic part of life into your comments. For example, you made an analogy for one student between the pitch of a slope and the tempo of a piece of music - it was more nuanced than that, but this is what I remember of it. You suggested to the student - again, this is my coarse gloss - that she didn't always need to jitterbug; sometimes it's good to mix things up with a pavan or whatever. You and I had a whole chairlift conversation about confidence, in which we hardly mentioned skiing, even though a comment I'd made about my own comfort level with certain kinds of terrain was clearly the context. Probably you are good at that because you have put major time and effort into lots of different non-skiing parts of your life. With this kind of attitude, I expect you will be among the first of us to thrive if and when you find yourself unable to ski for a while.

post #111 of 112
Thread Starter 

That's really a nice thing for you to write for me, qcanoe. Thank you. This is a fact: one of the best ski coaches in the history of ski coaching was at best an intermediate skier. (See [Article] Kruckenhauser On Ski Teaching)

post #112 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

 This is a fact: one of the best ski coaches in the history of ski coaching was at best an intermediate skier. (See [Article] Kruckenhauser On Ski Teaching)

Amen to that one, he was good enough to know what he could not do.  One of the fathers of modern skiing.

 

Hearing could go (since it is already pretty well shot). biggrin.gif

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