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How to widen a ski boot cuff?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
What is the good way to widen ski boot cuff without compromizing integrity of the boot?

My current plug boot cuff was widened to accomodate my cuff muscle via cutting "V" in the back of the lower boot and putting two rivets around the cut. This modification did provide me with needed space, but degrated performance of the boot as I can feel the twist in the cuff of the boot when riding very wide or race skis. Because of the "v" cut, lower boot lost integrity and proper dynamics. The right and left parts of the lover boot flex in different direction as you innitiate the turn ( the outer half flexes forward, while inside half goes back). All that movement of lower boot tears appart the upper boot with the rivets transfering force on opposite directions. I am not even going to mention condition of my shins from all that friction.

So the question is: is there a good way to widen upper part of lower boot and upper boot to accomodate larger cuff muscule?

P.S. womens boots are not an option for the desired level of performance.
post #2 of 11

http://southernski.com/toe-jam-spreader-ultimate-cuff-stretcher.html

 

Check the above site out---we have been doing this service for over 5 years so far

We heat the upper shell just above the ankle bolts horizontally this plastic then stretches vertically and

once it cools the boot cuff will have a more upright stance.

 

If you want to send us your boots with a measurement of the circumference of your calves at the top of 

the liners we charge $60.00 to position the cuff to accommodate your legs.

 

Mike

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Mike,

Thank you for the responce! Two questions:
1. If I understood you correctly, you streach the back of the boot to allow more space for the cuff muscle, but leave the angle between lower boot and tibia intected. Is that right?
2. This streach must soften the boot flex a little... How much?
3. In my particular case, it is not enough to streach the upper boot. Since I am skiing in plug boots, the upper part of the lower boot raises higher then my cuff muscle starts. Is it possible to streach the upper of the lower boot as well?
4. If you will streach the upper part of lower boot, does it mean that you will have to streach the whole upper boot, not only the top of it? Is that possible?

Thanks in advance!
post #4 of 11

how big is your calf muscle?  what model of boot are we dealing with? answers to these would be a starting point, stating that it would not be possible without giving us any dimension is a bit presumptive 

 

for example i have used the tool Mike supplies to stretch the upper cuff on my race boots Head raptor B3 and RS130 my calf measures 17.5" around the top of the boot, i managed to get the RS 130 to the point where i could stand and take photos at the side of a race course for 5 hours in comfort... no affect on the flex whatsoever, merely a shift of the cuff material back in  curve to stop the car being shunted forward

 

(i am assuming that your calf muscle size is the problem! or is it that you have a "thick ankle")

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by stroller View Post

Mike,

Thank you for the response! Two questions:
1. If I understood you correctly, you stretch the back of the boot to allow more space for the cuff muscle, but leave the angle between lower boot and tibia intected. Is that right?
2. This stretch must soften the boot flex a little... How much?
3. In my particular case, it is not enough to st reach the upper boot. Since I am skiing in plug boots, the upper part of the lower boot raises higher then my cuff muscle starts. Is it possible to st reach the upper of the lower boot as well?
4. If you will st reach the upper part of lower boot, does it mean that you will have to st reach the whole upper boot, not only the top of it? Is that possible?

Thanks in advance!

1.----We can stretch both the upper cuff and the spine (clog)  of the boot if needed.

 

2.----Does not affect the flex of the boot!

 

3.---yes.

 

4.---yes---as mentioned in answer #1

 

As CEM mentioned this has a profound effect on the COM position over the boot sole center (think of this as a good thing)

we have done this for folks who sent there boots in with the correct info about their calf circumference and had excellent results,

 

read through the post below.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/89407/calves-pushing-toes-forward-what-to-do

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Does somebody in illinois, Wisconsin or Michigan has your tool?
post #7 of 11

So far, the whole idea of forward lean affecting skiing is not accepted by many----consequently the tool has not sold into many markets as yet

 

no one in your area has the tool

 

we can turn your boots around in one day---shipping from your area is only 2-3 days---- send them on Monday get them back on Thursday or Friday.

 

glad to help if you see fit.

 

mike

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am 100% sure that skiing is very much affected by forward lean. What I am not entirely clear about is how to marry these two concepts of forward lean in skiing:
1. 12 degree (or 14 degree?) forward lean is optomal;
2. Plumb line from the knee bone should fall to the toe of the boot, while on nutral position.

Both can not be true for people with different length of the tibia.

So, if I have smaller foot in relation to the tibia (which I do), if condition #2 is true,I will end up skiing in more upright position, which will in turn decrease rotary range of motion ofmy femur and result in inability to produce high edge turns.

Now, if condition #1 is hels true, the plumb line from my knee falls far ahead of the toe ofmy boot, I do high edge turns, but my quads hurt like hell.

So, where is the happy medium?
post #9 of 11

Great that you are thinking about this so much but I'm not certain I agree with your conclusions although you are right to look for happy medium, but it is a medium that may only apply to your particular preferences, strengths and weaknesses.  More forward lean will obviously push your knee forward and in fact it may be in front of your toe, which then requires major quad activation to even stand let alone withstand ski forces.  But you say this position gives more rotary motion of the femur and I'm not certain I agree.  The more forward or bent position will give more translation of your knee laterally with a given rotary angle at the hip, but is it possible (I think so) the more bent position with substantial more muscle activation and sometimes more rearward hip and upperbody position leads to the availability of less rotary motion at the hip?

 

Lou

post #10 of 11

If on the return of the boots with a more upright stance you decide you don't like the effect, you could

 

always add a spoiler in between the shell and the liner to go back forward---but in all our experience we haven't seen

 

anyone do this.  So nothing lost and everything to gain?

 

I agree with Lou about the rotary thing by the way.

 

Also the more forward lean in the boot, the less absorption left available to you.  In other words if you start out in a low position

 

you can't much go lower.  Starting out in a taller stance relaxes the Quads more and still allows for plenty of rotary action.

 

mike

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Now when I am thinking about it more carefully, it is not that more upright stance limit rotary of the femur - it is actualy does not affect it. However, the same degree of rotated femur produce higher edge if knee and concequently ankle are more flexed
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