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Vintage Head - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
 

 

 

I'm not sure exactly what year Head brought the Master to market. The combination of a higher end ski and a Marker cable binding says mid 60's to me.

 

One of our "veteran" members will hopefully chime in with a release date of that ski model, which will help narrow it down further.

 

Hi Ken, welcome to Epic.  I am old (thanks Rossi) and skied the Masters for Several years.  Believe that the Head Master showed up about 63, the Comp was 61.

 To date yours look at the bindings too.  The earlier marker toe pieces were flat on top and had an external centering device/spring metal/catch in front.  Around 66? they got rid of the catch in front and curved the tops of the toe pieces.  They added springs in the back of the cable bindings about 65 too.  

 

Think the Master went away about 70 or so.  I skied mine till about 69.  They were a good forgiving ski, very nice in the day in soft snow.  Hope that helped confuse the whole picture.

post #32 of 41

Question: What is the draw to vintage skis aside from nostalgia and aesthetics? Is there a sense of reward from carving with a more difficult ski? I'm honestly curious.

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post
 

Question: What is the draw to vintage skis aside from nostalgia and aesthetics? Is there a sense of reward from carving with a more difficult ski? I'm honestly curious.

 

 

These skis required a relatively long "technique" learning curve that once a relatively high level was reached was something to be quite proud of. I think this was also combined with, at least in the Northeast, far more challenging conditions than are routinely found today.

 

I still love to ski on the pre shaped gear. For me it's absolutely just as fun, just different. Going back and forth with the two styles highlights the different technique needed for each and frankly it just feels good to use those old hard fought skills again.

post #34 of 41

I see, so the same reason some people play Broodwar over Starcraft 2, for those who know what I'm talking about.

post #35 of 41

Nikoras, Nostalgia is the primary reason for me. I have skis that I raced on in the mid 70s and it brings back great memories. It is also a keen reminder of how things have changed.

 

4f586211_Hannes+S.+Cup+98.JPG

In the last 90s with 1940s gear. My brother (second from left) and I (second from right) raced dual format GS during this Schneider Cup at Mt. Cranmore. I won :) I think this was the only race I've had against my brother. He is a natural and likely could have progressed farther then me in racing, if he had had the inclination.

 

068b7e18_750000%20Waterville%20Valley%20SL%202a.jpg

1975 - Corcoron Cup SL, Waterville Valley - Rossi STs, Nordica Grand Prix, Tyrolia bindings, Kerma poles

 

racing.jpg

2010 Inaugural Jimmie Heuga Memorial Race, Beaver Creek - all vintage gear from the 70s. Rossi ROCs, Lange (model just below the Banshee), Marker M4-15 with Rotamat, Scott 'Pointless' poles

 

It is amazing how you instinctively return to the old ways. Surprisingly, the old stuff doesn't ski that badly, but as RossiSmash points out, the learning curve was long and steep to master the older gear so having been there once, its like riding a bike and you just make it happen like you used to.

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post
 

Question: What is the draw to vintage skis aside from nostalgia and aesthetics? Is there a sense of reward from carving with a more difficult ski? I'm honestly curious.

 

For many  of the same reasons many people are drawn to vintage cars.  Just a different passion.  I don't collect but enjoy seeing a lot of old friends (and a few POS) skis.

 

Rossi, the West was a very different place too.  There was pretty much no grooming here either.  Imagine a Cascade or Chugach dump after a couple of days of freeze and thaw.  For many of us a plaster cast was the new black.

post #37 of 41

I'm just trying to picture myself yearning to return to my 2004 racing gear in 20 years and I DO NOT see that happening hahaha.

post #38 of 41

Nikoras,

 

It is hard to imagine where we will be in 20 years in terms of ski design. I can't imagine much change, but I didn't expect as much change as we had 20 years ago or 40 years ago for that matter. Hold onto your 2004 race skis and check back in in 20 years. :)

post #39 of 41

Thanks for the reply Stranger, I believe that the Marker bindings are the older one's with the flat top. I'll try an attach photos, but my original post I couldn't get the pictures to attach. Yea they attached.

 

 

 

post #40 of 41

Best guess; early 60's based on the Markers.  Owned a couple of pairs of those toe pieces, they were nasty, but they all were about then.  Are those Marker cables?

post #41 of 41

Stranger, I had just assumed that the cables were Marker, but on closer inspection on one side of  the clamping handle it has the markings, B.S.G.D.G. France-Etranger and on the other side, Made in France. As a side note to the questions of why people collect or want to ski on vintage equipment, I for the first time in around 30 yrs. will ski my Dynastar Course super G's from 1984. They are 213 cm and I just remember them as being best ski I have ever owned for going REAL fast. Should be a fun experiment.

Ken


Edited by brewit - 10/13/13 at 12:50pm
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