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TST vs. Jeffery vs.Gotama

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi All,

I'm looking for a new all mountain/ big mountain ski to replace my '09 line blends. I love my blends but want something a little more stable at speed and have more crud busting power.

My stomping grounds are pretty exclusively Tahoe and Aspen Highlands. I'm 5' 8 160lbs and an expert skier, raced in college and spend my time now either in the trees or hiking the bowl. However I do also love a ski i can lay on edge and carve some great turns on as well as get into the bumps with. I get about 14-21 days in a season but am not local enough to ski pow consistently. I've kind of narrowed it down to the armada TST, on3p Jeffery & Volkl Gotama. Ideally I'de like an early rise tip but don't need a tail rocker, I don't honestly ski switch.

I'de love to hear what you guys think!
post #2 of 7

Curious to know what made you pick those three choices.  I'm asking because you say you don't care about tail rocker and only want tip rocker.  However the Jeffrey has a fairly significant amount of tail rocker and the Goat is a full, continuous rocker.  So, what attracted you to those 3?  Knowing that would probably help understand what you think you're looking for.  Also, tail rocker doesn't just allow you to ski switch, but will change the way the ski feels and releases from turns.  There are plenty of valid reasons to like some tail rocker without skiing switch. There are also reasons to dislike it, depend on your personal preferences.

 

That said, I've only skied 1 of the 3 in your list (the goat) and therefore probably can't give you a whole lot of advice comparing them.  Have you had a chance to demo any of the 3 or anything else?  Will you be able to?

post #3 of 7

I'd say the Jeffery would have the most appeal for someone with your background, and conditions where you are. I say this by elimination, have skied the Goats and TST's briefly. Former is a nicer ski than the previous versions, but still not much on hard surfaces. The TST will not like variable snow at the speeds you're likely to produce. OTOH, if you're willing to consider other skis, plenty to choose from. 

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help Guys. 

 

@Jaobrien I picked these skis just based off of research and word of mouth. It's too late in the season for me to demo and I want to pick up a pair on sale. Plus I never ski the PNW so demoing the jeffrey's is not really an option, which sucks as they are my first choice right now. I've never actually skied a rockered ski so dont really know the difference in feeling. 

 

@Beyond The Jeffrey's were my first pick anyways but I'm worried they are going to be too stiff and not quick enough in the bumps and trees, plus as I said earlier I can't demo a pair. Just fyi I'm not much of a charger off piste, for me its all about sweet turns. What other skis would you suggest? I'm open to pretty much anything.

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desiomedia View Post

Thanks for the help Guys. 

 

@Jaobrien I picked these skis just based off of research and word of mouth. It's too late in the season for me to demo and I want to pick up a pair on sale. Plus I never ski the PNW so demoing the jeffrey's is not really an option, which sucks as they are my first choice right now. I've never actually skied a rockered ski so dont really know the difference in feeling. 

 

@Beyond The Jeffrey's were my first pick anyways but I'm worried they are going to be too stiff and not quick enough in the bumps and trees, plus as I said earlier I can't demo a pair. Just fyi I'm not much of a charger off piste, for me its all about sweet turns. What other skis would you suggest? I'm open to pretty much anything.


FWIW I spent half of last season on what was the proto for the current year's Jeffery. I found the combination of the elipitical sidecut, and the rockered tips and tails to be very sweet and fun off piste. It's not a really stiff ski, it has a real round flex that keeps it from being a noodle, but doesn't turn it in to an i beam. That is the effect of the bamboo, and carbon fiber

I know many skiers of all types locally that use it as their daily driver.

 

If they make a 191 version I will probably be back on the Jeffery at some point. It's a seriously fun ski.

post #6 of 7

I've been skiing on the TST off and on all season. Have not been on the others. I didn't chime in at first because I thought Beyond was right on the money, given your initial statement that you "want something a little more stable at speed [with] more crud busting power". The TST is probably not that ski, much as I love it for what I do, where and how I do it.

 

However, in your most recent post, you appear to flip-flop, and say about the Jeffrey that you are "worried they are going to be too stiff and not quick enough in the bumps and trees ... Just fyi I'm not much of a charger off piste, for me its all about sweet turns". Well, that's a different kettle of fish. You can't have it all. This really feels to me like one of those cases where you are trying to use "book knowledge" to answer a question that can only be addressed by physical experimentation. You need to demo. You don't have to demo these exact skis, but if you demo a range of 3 or 4 candidates and then come back to this board with your responses, someone will probably be able to say, "Well, if you liked the Soul Rider out of that group, you will probably also like the TST," or something like that.

 

My two cents.

post #7 of 7
I gave my 2012 Line Blends to my father, and replaced them with a pair of 188 Moment PB&Js and 192 Armada TSTs. The PB&J is going to be my swiss army knife of some sort, that can handle everything rather well and still ski switch/park laps. I hear it is a very fun ski because of the mustache rocker profile, while still being able to handle higher speeds, crud and chop due to the medium-stiff flex (8 on Moments scale, just like the Bibby, which is basically a wider version or the PB&J). I'm thinking you might like the PB&J for what your talking about, giving you really like the Blends (I did too)and would like a similarly playful ski that can handle higher speeds and crud/chop much better. That's exactly the ski I was looking for, and the Pb&J came out on top..

I also went with the 192 TST because I heard they're a very playful big mountain ski, rather than a crazy stable crud-buster. I also hear they ski very short, so the 183 will definitely not be too good in the chop and chunder if its skiing more like a 170cm ski, and I heard the 193 is the way to go if you need to handle some crud. However, it's still rated very highly for steep terrain and deep snow, due to the tip being 95% the size of the JJ, which is 14mm wider underfoot. It's just designed more for having fun bounding of small-medium terrain features and cliffs and pivoting through trees on that steep terrain (perfect for Alta/Jackson/Big Sky), more so than charging huge open lines at 60 mph (more like alaska or South America). Im pretty confident that the 193 TST will still be decent in the crud and chop, although I have a much stiffer, burlier 192 Belafonte if I ever find a place to blast down massive open lines (most likely not the situation for most skiers, especially in the lower 48). I was afraid that the TST would be too soft as well, but after diving into TGR Forums and web reviews, I am pretty confident it has enough burl-factor underfoot to handle what I can put it through. I really bought it for a ski that is extremely playful, while still having a directional profile to take those playful shred sessions to the next level and a little bit faster and a little bit bigger.

Here is StartHaus review of the TST, which really was my deciding factor in purchasing these skis. They pushed me over the edge to buy.
"Strengths: Playful and fully capable in the powder, thanks to big rockered and tapered tips that don’t dive or hook in 3-dimensional snow. Camber underfoot keeps these skis capable on the hardpack, moderate flex for an easy-going feel.

Weaknesses: Softer flex than some in this group gives up a little edge grip on hard snow, big rockered tips make for a shorter running length, so size up.

Who it’s for: The Armada TST is a playful powder oriented big mountain ski that’s best for someone who likes to surf, smear and pop off terrain features rather than straight-lining down the fall line or laying down trenches on the groomers."

If the TST can handle what the late Travis Steeger could put them through (his daily driver for the deep @ Whitewater, BC), and as the all-mountain/Big-MTN ski for the rest of the Armada Pros, im pretty confident they can handle what You or I can throw at them.
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