EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New skiier, looking to set up clothing for next year
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New skiier, looking to set up clothing for next year

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I am new to skiing and to this  great site.  Went skiing in late Feb for the first time, then twice more in March. Mid- Atlantic region. Completely in love at this point, and sad that the Mid-Atlantic season is over for me. I am looking at setting up my clothing for next fall over the spring/summer. Will be skiing mid-Atlantic for the most part, but possibly a trip or two either to North East US resorts or possibly Canada next season.  I am pretty set with jacket and pants. Even though I am planning to ski, I got a 686 Smarty Static jacket ( 3-1)

and 686 Smarty pants. I liked the look, price, features, fit of the pants and jacket so I got them even though I am planning to ski  ( might try snowboarding - but primarily ski)

I also have some LL Bean long underwear that  did a good job at Snowshoe in Feb, but my mid layer was a  50% cotton 50% poly turtle neck. Not the greatest when it warmed up.

My main question is who to categorize the zip out liner in the jacket. Should I consider it a mid layer?  I am thinking either of getting a  ski specific mid layer to use with LL Bean base layer, or getting a Hot Chillys La Montana base top. I also have a few quarter zip fleece tops from Kohl's that could work. My thinking with the Hot Chillys is I can use it as a base layer or under the LL Bean base layer, then use with the jacket and liner depending on temp. If additional layer is needed, throw a Kohl's fleece over the base layer- hot chillys.

Just looking for a few pieces that will give most flexibility depending on temps. I  am middling when it comes to being hot or cold in general. Not a shorts in the middle of winter but also not someone who is always cold.  I know youse may not be familiar with the weight of the items I have now, just looking for some advice. Mainly  need to know what value to put on the liner of the jacket so I can build around it. At 50 degrees I had just the turtle neck, no base layer, and the jacket w/liner and was pretty warm.

post #2 of 13

Hey dave j! 

 

First things first... it's very important that you avoid at all costs cotton, cotton simply doesn't work as it will retain moisture and get you cold! Base and mid layers have to be either synthetic (patagonia capilene, polartec power dry) or wool (merino wool). It will really depend on personal preference. synthetic are usually 100% polyester and will dry faster than wool, but also get stinky after a day skiing. Merino wool tends to take a little bit more time to get dry and eliminate moisture but it doesn't/takes a long time to get stinky!

 

You 3-1 jacket is pretty much a set of shell+mid layer, the zip on jacket is a mid layer.

 

Good mid layers are pretty much all fleece or down, there are some synthetic jackets as well, but mostly you are gonna find fleece jackets and down jackets.

 

Unfortunately you kinda gonna have to learn by yourself what do you need in terms of warmth and layering... some people get warm and comfortable with a micro weight base layer, fleece and a shell. Others will need more layers or a heavy weight base layer plus a shell with some insulation like primaloft or down.

 

In your case I would invest some money on baselayers either a capilene or merino wool. You might be able to find something on sale at Patagonia, also sierra trading post (send me a PM if you want to learn how to find coupons) has some pretty good deals on merino wool (smartwool and icebreaker) base layers.

 

Other than that you are good to go with your 686 jackets and pants, although you might have to replace your pants down the road because they don't offer any cuff guards or protection against ski edges which tend to be pretty rough on pants!

 

Also don't forget to give up cotton socks! Get some ski specific socks, smartwool and icebreaker make great socks!

 

About your comment at 50 degress, it would be best if you keep a base layer and give up the fleece liner! since base layers will help to wick away moisture from your body!

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post

Hey dave j! 

 

First things first... it's very important that you avoid at all costs cotton, cotton simply doesn't work as it will retain moisture and get you cold! Base and mid layers have to be either synthetic (patagonia capilene, polartec power dry) or wool (merino wool). It will really depend on personal preference. synthetic are usually 100% polyester and will dry faster than wool, but also get stinky after a day skiing. Merino wool tends to take a little bit more time to get dry and eliminate moisture but it doesn't/takes a long time to get stinky!

 

You 3-1 jacket is pretty much a set of shell+mid layer, the zip on jacket is a mid layer.

 

Good mid layers are pretty much all fleece or down, there are some synthetic jackets as well, but mostly you are gonna find fleece jackets and down jackets.

 

Unfortunately you kinda gonna have to learn by yourself what do you need in terms of warmth and layering... some people get warm and comfortable with a micro weight base layer, fleece and a shell. Others will need more layers or a heavy weight base layer plus a shell with some insulation like primaloft or down.

 

In your case I would invest some money on baselayers either a capilene or merino wool. You might be able to find something on sale at Patagonia, also sierra trading post (send me a PM if you want to learn how to find coupons) has some pretty good deals on merino wool (smartwool and icebreaker) base layers.

 

Other than that you are good to go with your 686 jackets and pants, although you might have to replace your pants down the road because they don't offer any cuff guards or protection against ski edges which tend to be pretty rough on pants!

 

Also don't forget to give up cotton socks! Get some ski specific socks, smartwool and icebreaker make great socks!

 

About your comment at 50 degress, it would be best if you keep a base layer and give up the fleece liner! since base layers will help to wick away moisture from your body!

What mfa81 said, particularly about using synthetics and  Sierra Trading Post.  The only I would add is gloves and mittens.  If you have the money, warm mittens, gloves and spring gloves are great to have.  If you don't purchase mittens, using those hand warmers will keep your fingers ok when the temperature drops into the uncomfortable range.

post #4 of 13

my only comment about the base layers is they don't necessarily have to be ski specific-or expensive.

The baselayers for other sports-like your nike dryfits or under armor, or even your generics from Target work just fine for skiing base layers too.  

Just check that it is non-cotton, The label should say polyester or wool, maybe some spandex for stretch.

 

As you get better at skiing, you will also be warmer by

1) not falling into snow as much

2) being in better shape and able to output more bodyheat energy  

post #5 of 13

Nothing wrong with your LL Bean baselayer if it's synthetic. The fleece tops from Kohl's, again assuming synthetic, will work fine.  Buy as little as possible for now until you see what you already have that works. Sounds to me like you're already set pretty well. There's no law that says you can't ski in snowboard clothes or vice versa, And a lot of people have found good quality outdoor clothing at Cabela's for a lot less than ski-marketed clothing.  I personally don't like ordering clothes on line--hard to know what you're getting and how it will fit. And you don't need Mt Everest quality clothing for resort skiing--there's always the lodge and a cup of cocoa.  If you find you like skiing in storms--a lot of us love it--then you might invest in some top of the line clothing. The hardest thing to get right is probably gloves--I strongly recommend waterproof breathable.  (I use Kinco's 901 leather gloves--beloved by ski patrol but not by fashion conscious skiers, and have found them to work as well as nylon, goretex gloves that cost a lot more.) You may find you need mittens--up to you. Some light gloves for warm weather are nice--I've used unlined pigskin (not cow leather) work gloves or synthetic work gloves from Home Depot.  Or you can spend more.

post #6 of 13
Love the Hot Chiles as a base layer. I use the zip turtle necks.- micro elite zip t- is the official name. bombproof, warm and will last many seasons. Should be 1/2 price this time of year.
+ on Bean too. Inexpensive and works.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the good responses !

The LL bean long john top is synthetic. It's light weight and black. I 've had them for a long time so I forgot what bean called them.

My kohl's fleeces are 100% polyester

I did buy some Kombi Gore Tex mittens, but after using at App and Sugar in 30- 50 degree weather I fear they may be overkill most of the time. May look into a  Gore Tex glove that is not too warm to add to mix

 

Around here it was cool and rainy Thursday, upper 30's to maybe 40 with rain and a small breeze. I did a bit of experimenting as I walk 2 energetic young dogs twice a day.  Last night  ( upper 30's with a small breeze and light rain) I  had on only my LL Bean long john top and my jacket with liner. Was pretty comfy.  This morning, it was maybe 38 according to my outdoor temp sensor with a small breeze. I tried on only a Kohl's fleece as a base and the jacket shell and no liner. Was pretty comfy as well. The fleece is not baggy but comfortably loose and sized correctly for me. I didn't ( couldn't ) tuck it in my pants so I did feel a gap between it and me.  Not wanting to use a fleece like this as a base layer but wanted to  try and approximate what a heavyweight base layer under just the shell might feel like.  Granted none of this is like real live skiing situations, just trying to feel it out. Based on my comfort levels under the conditions described above, I am thinking a heavyweight base layer like a La Montana or Patagonia might be my purchase. Something that can go next to my skin or over the light weight bean base layer I have. Between  a light and heavy base layer, the shell and liner, I think I'd be good well into the 20's,maybe teens's,  and could throw a fleece on for the really cold days.

I'll be checking out Sierra Trading  Post ! Thanks for that advice mfa81 and will hit you on PM.  Back Country also has some heavyweight base layers.
 

post #8 of 13

As far as the mittens/gloves go.  You just need to look for waterproof breathable.  The patent for goretex ran out about a decade back, so there's no bonus to specifically look for the goretex brand.

If you want to adjust to conditions, I would suggest having a pair of liner gloves to throw on, instead of going with chemical hand warmers.  

If you like to be on your smartphone all the time, you may want to look into gloves that have a conductive patch on a couple finger, or you can do your own modification with some conductive thread (search google).

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

As far as the mittens/gloves go.  You just need to look for waterproof breathable.  The patent for goretex ran out about a decade back, so there's no bonus to specifically look for the goretex brand.

If you want to adjust to conditions, I would suggest having a pair of liner gloves to throw on, instead of going with chemical hand warmers.  

If you like to be on your smartphone all the time, you may want to look into gloves that have a conductive patch on a couple finger, or you can do your own modification with some conductive thread (search google).

Do yourself (and everyone who rides a lift with you) a favor and leave the phone at home, or at least in your pocket.  Every minute you're on the phone is a minute that life is passing you by.

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Do yourself (and everyone who rides a lift with you) a favor and leave the phone at home, or at least in your pocket.  Every minute you're on the phone is a minute that life is passing you by.

 

I am with you oldgoat. In my 3 ski trips, it was left in the car or room. I may start to carry it at some point, but as a beginner I don't need the distraction.  And if/when I start  bringing it on the slopes it will be for emergency use only, or  if I feel comfortable listening to music. But to call and chit chat, naw.

I am there to ski, and enjoy mother nature.

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

So I am looking thru my closet and find a long sleeved workout shirt made by Champion. I buy my workout clothing mostly from Target and the Champion stuff holds up well without the cost of the big label stuff. This was a long sleeved shirt I bought for cool weather tennis but I don't think I ever wore it. It's heavier than the LL Bean longjohn shirt that is  100% polyester and is looser fitting.  The label on the Champion shirt says 90% polyester and 10% lycra. Here is my question. I see a lot of base layers made from a combination of poly and lycra. What makes a base layer? If it is simply the "ingredients then I have a mid wieght in the closet !  This top is a mock neck 1/4 zip too !

post #12 of 13

Cross out the "pion" so it says "Cham"--as in Chamonix--and you're good to go.  And seriously--should work fine.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave j View Post

So I am looking thru my closet and find a long sleeved workout shirt made by Champion. I buy my workout clothing mostly from Target and the Champion stuff holds up well without the cost of the big label stuff. This was a long sleeved shirt I bought for cool weather tennis but I don't think I ever wore it. It's heavier than the LL Bean longjohn shirt that is  100% polyester and is looser fitting.  The label on the Champion shirt says 90% polyester and 10% lycra. Here is my question. I see a lot of base layers made from a combination of poly and lycra. What makes a base layer? If it is simply the "ingredients then I have a mid wieght in the closet !  This top is a mock neck 1/4 zip too !

The fancier base layers have more complex weaves of the material, to increase the wicking power.  So it's not just about the ingredients.  It's like threadcount on sheets. As another example, powder and ice are also the same.  

 

But you are on the right track.  1st priority is just non-cotton.  It doesn't have to be ski specific or expensive.  

As I mentioned previously, you can do fine with clothes designed for other athletics. You can readup on whatever fancy tech nike/reebok/underarmour markets and it'll work for skiing also.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New skiier, looking to set up clothing for next year