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Does It Really Snow 23% More on the Weekends?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Or, are the ski areas guilty of false advertising?  Thanks to another gem found at www.academia.edu, (there is a lot of scholarly papers no one reads there) we have an answer:

 

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~ericz/wintertime.pdf

post #2 of 18

No no noooooo!!!!!!!!   They actually UNDER report snow on weekdays so that the locals and employees have the fresh tracks all to themselves without having to fight the Powder Fever sick day visitors..

post #3 of 18

Someone did a study and wrote a 29 page college paper about how ski resorts over report snowfall?  Really, this is what is happening in college these days?  I won't even bother reading until it has been analyzed by EpicSki Ski Scientists.  I think this topic has been beaten to death in a few other threads too.

post #4 of 18

All the major snowstorms here happened during the week, we must be an anomaly.

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

Someone did a study and wrote a 29 page college paper about how ski resorts over report snowfall?  Really, this is what is happening in college these days?  I won't even bother reading until it has been analyzed by EpicSki Ski Scientists.  I think this topic has been beaten to death in a few other threads too.

 

It's normal in university to study things that appear to be "common sense" so that we can validate that our assumptions are true. I think the research prompts more interesting questions: what are the forces driving over-reporting on weekends, and what volume of influence can these forces exert over the mountain and the public? 

post #6 of 18

It only snows 23% more the day after I leave a ski resort.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

It's normal in university to study things that appear to be "common sense" so that we can validate that our assumptions are true. I think the research prompts more interesting questions: what are the forces driving over-reporting on weekends, and what volume of influence can these forces exert over the mountain and the public? 

Not to mention that I assume this was done by Dartmoth students, not a research professor.  Students are often asked to study and write about topics that are often already beat to death in order to get the research process down, so if they do move on to more "breaking" topics, they are already  familar with the process.

post #8 of 18
Bad assumption. You can google the author and find its an associate professor in economics. Hes got a lot of other articles written up in the similar vein of applying scientific/economc analysis and principles to day-to-day for mainly entertainment/recreational value, and not meant to be overly rigorous.

Quite a few books along these lines get published, the most popular being freakonomics, which got a documentary movie a few years back that illustrated a few of the chapters. It makes for the quick odd-news segment in periodicals.
post #9 of 18

in any case, i don't think it needs to be overly rigourous (i'm not saying it's not, since i didn't read the whole thing) to illustrates a trend, wether it's 15% or 23% makes no difference to the actual point.

 

Still it's interesting someone puts a number on things most of us supsect.

 

however, i always get fed up with the language of academia... it always ends up turing relativley simple things into complex hard to understand concepts.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by yann View Post

in any case, i don't think it needs to be overly rigourous (i'm not saying it's not, since i didn't read the whole thing) to illustrates a trend, wether it's 15% or 23% makes no difference to the actual point.

 

Still it's interesting someone puts a number on things most of us supsect.

 

however, i always get fed up with the language of academia... it always ends up turing relativley simple things into complex hard to understand concepts.

They usually come out with the paper first, so the nitpickers can have at it (just like the heated debates here,, there are the "show me the numbers" crowd).

 

Then should they be interested in this line of more entertaining research, they will write it up in more regular language.

 

Do check out freakonomics, the movie version, or other similar books.  I think that is exactly what that you are looking for without the jargon. They got a website here if you just want to spend a little bit of time.

http://www.freakonomics.com/

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

Bad assumption. You can google the author and find its an associate professor in economics. Hes got a lot of other articles written up in the similar vein of applying scientific/economc analysis and principles to day-to-day for mainly entertainment/recreational value, and not meant to be overly rigorous.

Quite a few books along these lines get published, the most popular being freakonomics, which got a documentary movie a few years back that illustrated a few of the chapters. It makes for the quick odd-news segment in periodicals.

 

Bah, facts.  Who needs em?

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by St Bear View Post

 

Bah, facts.  Who needs em?

 

Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

 "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics."  Attributed to Disraeli

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by St Bear View Post

Not to mention that I assume this was done by Dartmoth students, not a research professor.  Students are often asked to study and write about topics that are often already beat to death in order to get the research process down, so if they do move on to more "breaking" topics, they are already  familar with the process.

 

That report is a well written piece of poop.  It makes me sad someone probably spent a fair amount of time putting it together.

post #15 of 18

Dumps happen more during the weekdays than weekends, really 5 weekdays vs 2 weekend days...simple logic.  You could ski a few days after a dump inbounds during the weekdays and still have fresh lines, on the weekends it's usually tracked out by noon.

post #16 of 18

So who read the whole thing?

post #17 of 18

This is a 3 1/2 year old story.

http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=8199

 

I'm surprised it didn't get picked up here when it was first written. Maybe it did but I tried a search and couldn't find it.  I remembered analyzing it on FTO and found the thread above easily.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

 "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics."  Attributed to Disraeli

 

Statistics are like a bikini. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.

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