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BMX 108 vs Cochise (or other Tahoe Crud ski for a big guy, 6'3" 220)?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

After a relatively mediocre season at Squaw/Alpine in Tahoe I found myself skiing crud and bumps most of the time, which I guess is what you do in most normal years at Squaw, but I've been spoiled by pretty good powder days there last March/April and the entire year before.  Days where skis like my DPS 112 RPCs are completely at home and a ton of fun, but are too light and not damp enough to be a true crud buster days after a storm and are def. too stiff for bumps.

 

This year, obviously has been all about crud and bumps on 3 month old snow.  For the last two years, I've been a huge fan of the 187 Bonafides in any sort of soft-ish conditions off-piste a few days after a storm, or even on soft to frozen groomers, but after picking up some 188 Kästle MX 88's for 50% off MSRP on the clymb, I realized what an amazingly smooth ski that is--and it's much more the type of ski *feel* on snow I'm preferring as my ability progresses.  Obviously, neither are great bump skis in that length, but they aren't horrible either.

 

It's a bit of a catch .22...at my size 6'3', 220lbs I love the "playful, light, easy to turn" feeling of the Bones, but start getting bounced around in crud and find myself wishing for more dampness and stability at speed.  I'm pretty sure this is because of the soft-ish shovel on the Bone and it is just overall a very light ski.  On the 188 MX 88's I can't believe how smooth they are in rough snow and crud, but I long for just a tad more width and some tip and tail rocker to make turn initiation and slarving easier.  

 

So....the BMX 108 sounds like it might be the perfect ski for me, IF it had metal.  I'm also looking at the Cochise, but I've heard that they may not be quite stiff enough either for a guy my size, but probably perfect if I dropped 20-30 pounds.

 

Is there a ski out there that's made for bigger guys--something like a true Big Mountain comp ski, that's going to bash crud bowls but also still be playful/slarve and not be useless in the bumps?  

 

186 Bodacious, 191 Katana, Dynastar Cham 107, Head Rev 105, Moment Governor or something of the sort?  Which of these would be the best for still being able to get through the ultra-steep bumps at the top of Headwall, Northbowl, etc. then open up into nice S turns at speed down the fall-line through the rest wide open crud bowls?  At my size/weight I'm assuming a comp ski like this would probably be more manageable/accessible than it would be to most skiers?  Ability-wise, I consider myself Advanced--I can ski the whole mountain at Squaw and Alpine pretty well and with good speed but still struggle a bit in steep bumps and narrow chutes.

 

I've read a lot of reviews of skis by guys like Dawg, or the guys over at Blister, which are all great by the way, but I see very few reviews of skis by or for bigger heavier guys like me.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 22

The Cochise are a lot of work in the bumps - for me - but I'm much smaller than you at 5" 11" / 170 pounds.

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

Just read a review of the old (2012) now discontinued Legend Pro Rider 105.  Sounds exactly what I'm looking for.  Is there a modern ski coming like this for next season?  Cham 107 is def. not it.  

post #4 of 22

At 6' 244# My 186 Bodacious are very quick.

 

They spin from full lock to opposite lock like snapping a finger.  I'd expect the Cochise to perform in a similar fashion.

 

PS, the LPR 105s are more of a full flat tail ride that completes turns(and hooks tails) with less slarvability.

 

I did love the 184 Cham97, it was very turny and would vary the radius with a subtle input.  Their main drawback is in big mountain stability at mach speeds, I was wishing for another 8-10 cm in length but it is just not there. Perhaps the Helldorado would be worth a look.

post #5 of 22

Cochise in 193. It will give you all the top end you need, super damp, yet still easy to pivot, slarve, etc. for its size.

post #6 of 22
Moment Belafonte or Kastle BMX 108. Here are some links to some good reviews of the Moment. BlisterGear is a very reputable ski review website, and they highly recommend the Belafontes. I also own the Moment Governor, and it will ski exactly like what your looking for, with a dash of playfulness on the side, its an amazing ski, it just might be a bit wide for what your looking for.

If I were you, I would go with either of the Moments (Governor or Belafonte). I bet they'd be a match made in heaven for you. Moment is selling a 196 Bibby Special (same as Governor, the year before it was called Bibby Special) for 399$, but it has been sitting there for a while so I bet you could get them to do it for 350$ http://www.momentouterwear.com/collections/skis/products/bibby-special-196

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/review-moment-belafonte

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2nd-look-moment-belafonte-182cm

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/3rd-look-moment-belafonte-182cm

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/moment-belafonte-187cm
Edited by SkiSafe - 4/3/13 at 7:12am
post #7 of 22
Neither the BMX 108 or Belafonte have metal, but they're burlier than the Cochise. A ski doesnt need metal to do what you want it to do, it just has to be built specifically for a high BURL-Factor. Adding metal, IMO, makes a ski less agile. The Belafonte 192 is " A cochise with an attitude", yet still can handle the bumps and trees better.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 

That's funny, I almost impulsively pulled the trigger several times already on the BMX 108 since they are still on the clymb for 50% off msrp which is a great deal, I just wasn't sure if they'd be burly enough but it sounds like they might be.  If it's anywhere near as damp and smooth as the MX88 in crud, that would be the ticket.

 

Belefonte is really really tempting too, I just don't like this year's top sheet--too much going on and you're going to be staring at that like all the time and this will be my new daily driver.  The base graphic on the Belefonte is SICK though--I wish that was the topsheet! (I like the Bibby topsheet too).  Bibby's sound very very close to what I'm looking for but might be too wide for a daily driver in Tahoe, no?

 

Next year's Cochise also looks pretty bitchen http://shop.starthaus.com/store/pc/2014-Blizzard-Cochise-Big-Mountain-Ski-p11356.htm, but it's definitely the priciest of all options...  I really need to demo it, because it doesn't sound like it's any "burlier" than a Bonafide at all, just a different flex profile and different snow feel.

post #9 of 22

^^ You can find a 2013 Cochise for a lot less in several places.  Same exact ski.

post #10 of 22

I'm also having trouble deciding between the skis brought up here - Blizzard Cochise 185, Kastle BMX 108 188, Moment Belafonte 187.  I'm leaning towards the Cochise, mostly due to Blister's glowing reviews, price point, and the fact that I've demo'd the Cochise and not the other skis.

 

I have a pair of Dynastar LP 105 192 and am looking to replace their position in my quiver with something that's easier to pivot and break free without sacrificing too much top end.  I think the Cochise could do it for me.  I'm shying away from the Belafonte due to Blister's claims that they take a good bit of detuning and persuasion to break free.  I also have reservations about the BMX 108 after reading snofun's comparison to the old MX108 - I think I would've liked the old metal layup better.

 

So, how much burlier is the BMX 108 compared to the Cochise?  The fact that there are comp skiers having success with the Cochise leads me to believe they are sufficient, even for the bigger guys?

 

While demoing the Cochise, I noticed the tips catching a bit in crud, and had to adjust and ski them more centered, but that's the only criticism I had, if that even counts as criticism.  I never really got them going fast enough to really test stability. 

 

I also tried the Katana a couple seasons ago and was blown away by that ski, fwiw.

 

I haven't been able to find very many direct comparison's between the Cochise and BMX 108.  I'd love to hear some more opinions.

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

Hi all,

 

After a relatively mediocre season at Squaw/Alpine in Tahoe I found myself skiing crud and bumps most of the time, which I guess is what you do in most normal years at Squaw, but I've been spoiled by pretty good powder days there last March/April and the entire year before.  Days where skis like my DPS 112 RPCs are completely at home and a ton of fun, but are too light and not damp enough to be a true crud buster days after a storm and are def. too stiff for bumps.

 

This year, obviously has been all about crud and bumps on 3 month old snow.  For the last two years, I've been a huge fan of the 187 Bonafides in any sort of soft-ish conditions off-piste a few days after a storm, or even on soft to frozen groomers, but after picking up some 188 Kästle MX 88's for 50% off MSRP on the clymb, I realized what an amazingly smooth ski that is--and it's much more the type of ski *feel* on snow I'm preferring as my ability progresses.  Obviously, neither are great bump skis in that length, but they aren't horrible either.

 

It's a bit of a catch .22...at my size 6'3', 220lbs I love the "playful, light, easy to turn" feeling of the Bones, but start getting bounced around in crud and find myself wishing for more dampness and stability at speed.  I'm pretty sure this is because of the soft-ish shovel on the Bone and it is just overall a very light ski.  On the 188 MX 88's I can't believe how smooth they are in rough snow and crud, but I long for just a tad more width and some tip and tail rocker to make turn initiation and slarving easier.  

 

So....the BMX 108 sounds like it might be the perfect ski for me, IF it had metal.  I'm also looking at the Cochise, but I've heard that they may not be quite stiff enough either for a guy my size, but probably perfect if I dropped 20-30 pounds.

 

Is there a ski out there that's made for bigger guys--something like a true Big Mountain comp ski, that's going to bash crud bowls but also still be playful/slarve and not be useless in the bumps?  

 

186 Bodacious, 191 Katana, Dynastar Cham 107, Head Rev 105, Moment Governor or something of the sort?  Which of these would be the best for still being able to get through the ultra-steep bumps at the top of Headwall, Northbowl, etc. then open up into nice S turns at speed down the fall-line through the rest wide open crud bowls?  At my size/weight I'm assuming a comp ski like this would probably be more manageable/accessible than it would be to most skiers?  Ability-wise, I consider myself Advanced--I can ski the whole mountain at Squaw and Alpine pretty well and with good speed but still struggle a bit in steep bumps and narrow chutes.

 

I've read a lot of reviews of skis by guys like Dawg, or the guys over at Blister, which are all great by the way, but I see very few reviews of skis by or for bigger heavier guys like me.

 

Thanks!

If you can think through this question of priority, you'll be close to figuring this out. Otherwise you're stuck.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

That's funny, I almost impulsively pulled the trigger several times already on the BMX 108 since they are still on the clymb for 50% off msrp which is a great deal, I just wasn't sure if they'd be burly enough but it sounds like they might be.  If it's anywhere near as damp and smooth as the MX88 in crud, that would be the ticket.

 

Belefonte is really really tempting too, I just don't like this year's top sheet--too much going on and you're going to be staring at that like all the time and this will be my new daily driver.  The base graphic on the Belefonte is SICK though--I wish that was the topsheet! (I like the Bibby topsheet too).  Bibby's sound very very close to what I'm looking for but might be too wide for a daily driver in Tahoe, no?

 

Next year's Cochise also looks pretty bitchen http://shop.starthaus.com/store/pc/2014-Blizzard-Cochise-Big-Mountain-Ski-p11356.htm, but it's definitely the priciest of all options...  I really need to demo it, because it doesn't sound like it's any "burlier" than a Bonafide at all, just a different flex profile and different snow feel.

You really should get some info on the Bmx series as they're quite different than the Mx. It is not damp and smooth like the Mx. (I thought it was lightish and dead)

Never tried the wide ones, but the Bmx 88 I thought was awful and I loved the Mx88. Bmx was super quick edge to edge in the fall line, but for turns it seemed to just want large. I didn't miss it a bit after a day. I'm about 195# 5 10".

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

You really should get some info on the Bmx series as they're quite different than the Mx. It is not damp and smooth like the Mx. (I thought it was lightish and dead)

Never tried the wide ones, but the Bmx 88 I thought was awful and I loved the Mx88. Bmx was super quick edge to edge in the fall line, but for turns it seemed to just want large. I didn't miss it a bit after a day. I'm about 195# 5 10".

 

I have the MX108's, and bought some BMX's for another quiver, but sold them within 3 days of buying them. Not the same ski, not even close, and sadly not available as an MX108 anymore. Managed to find another pair of MX108's for that quiver, and they'll stay there a long time.

post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Not to resurrect an old thread from the dead, but I do want to give a shout-out to my ultimate decision, which was the BMX 108 (12/13 model) in 188 mounted with STH 14's.  (And yes, somewhat disconcertingly and also unknowingly so, this combo wound up visibly matching my Lange RX 130's a little too well!)
 
Special shout-out to SkiSafe for pushing me to these over the Cochise!  
 
I bought these in a Clymb sale last summer, but just mounted them a few weeks ago since Tahoe only got enough snow to ski them until now.  
 
I've had them in the following conditions so far at Squaw and Alpine the last few weekends and here's my impressions:
 
1st Weekend:
 
1st day - Frozen crud on the back side of Alpine.  Skied in a normal GS-style, and they absolutely slayed this stuff!  It wasn't a "smooth" ride per say and I was wondering if there could be damper ski's in this category, but they were totally predictable.  I was actually skiing that shit with a smile on my face--it was fun!
 
Day 2:  Smooth chalk all around Squaw, especially on Granite:  Again, they ski'd like a traditional wide GS ski.  Edge hold was phenomenal although they screamed like a banshee when the "chalk" was a bit firmer/icier and you were holding on for dear life in scraped out chutes.  This was disconcerting at first, but I never, ever felt need for more grip.  In fact, the screaming banshee sound was almost comforting after awhile knowing that was their "I'm not going to lose edge grip anytime soon sound.”  BTW, this was the factory-fresh stock-tune out of the box, tips and tails detuned by my binding installer.  
 
Day 3 - In the 50+ degree temps the last couple of days everything was softening up -- the crud was getting softer in places and later in the day there was practically spring corn and slush in places.  Again, no complaints.  They ski'd everything predictably well.  I’m wondering at this point if this is going to be my new daily driver?
 
2nd Weekend: 
 
Day 1:  Dawn patrol morning at Squaw, with 2 feet of fresh.  Avy bombs going off all morning lapping Shirley Lake while we were waiting for Granite to open.  Typical Sierra cement and hardly a POW day; it was wet, heavy, deep snow.  Snow was a little lighter at the top through the mid-section of Granite, maybe POW by Tahoe standards, but still thick.  My pole would easily pierce 2+ feet through the snow, but my ski's still sat firmly on top.  Even though it was 2 feet of fresh, when skiing it, you would drop down maybe only 6 inches or so into it.  I was having a hard time skiing these conditions on the BMX 108's, but it was 'effing challenging snow to ski in, especially since I was rusty having not skied in actual Sierra cement for about a year!  I was wishing I had brought something wider and naturally turnier like my DPS RPC's, but overall, once I figured out that the BMX's respond best to confident input at all times, they did fine.  I could easily scrub speed sideways when I started to get out of control or in the back seat.  
 
Contrary to several other reviews, I actually found the tails to be pretty stiff.  Definitely as stiff or stiffer than my Bonafides, Dynastar SpeedCourse and MX88's.  In combination with the relatively softer shovel, I found myself in the backseat quite a bit this day and those tails would send me flying down the hill at mach speed when this would happen.  I had to stay very forward and focused on them in these conditions all day.  It was here that the BMX's happily reminded me all-day of my true ability--I'm not quite an Expert--yet.    By the end of the day I could feel how friggin' heavy they are on my feet and frankly, once I was tired they were kicking my ass!
 
Day 2: Pussed out and brought my Bonafides.  It was pissing down slush and rain, with near zero visibility and monster winds.  There was a few inches of fresh on top of moguled out and cut up terrain and the visibility was so bad you couldn't tell where the bumps and ruts were.    I immediately noticed how much lighter the Bones were, but also much less damp. I was getting bucked around all over the place and was dreaming about being back on the BMX.  Don't get me wrong, the Bones are/were my favorite ski to date, they are much easier and more forgiving to ski while still being burly enough, but they also reminded me why I wanted the BMX in the first place!  I just never felt the Bones had what I was looking for in crud and unpredictable, variable conditions; BMX 108's are absolutely the most at home here, IMO.
 
Here's some of the random thoughts I've had so farwhile skiing them:  
 
Groomers:  They LOVE groomers and mach speed.  I'm perplexed by other reviews that say they aren't great here.  I'd argue they are as good as my Dynastar Speed Course.  
Crud:  They LOVE crud and I was seeking it out every chance I got and I have NEVER done that on any other ski--they absolutely seek and destroy crud.  
Bumps: I’m not the best bump skier around, but I felt better on them in bumps than I have on any other ski in my quiver.  They seem to handle bumps really, really well.  For me and my bad bump technique, they are definitely better than my Bones and my MX88’s in 188, believe it or not.
All Mountain/Big Mountain capability:  They are an amazingly consistent ski all over the mountain.  They are as good of an all-mountain ski for me as something 88 under foot like my old Volkl Kendos.  At the same time, they seem to be a scarily capable BIG mountain ski.  Definitely more ski than I will ever need in that particular regard anytime soon.
Short radius turns:  They can make any turn shape with little effort.
Traditional ski:  They need to be ski'd with your shins on the front of your boots at all times.  They do NOT like, appreciate or want lazy skiing.  
Length:  I never really felt like they were too long in the 188 length except for one instance I was in a chute that was about as wide as they were and in other really really tight spots.  I am certain that more skilled pilots than I would have done fine here.  I honestly can’t imagine skiing these in 195 unless I was (yeah right) entering a Big Mountain competition or something.  
Tails: Again, contrary to other reviews I’ve read, I had a sense from the beginning that they had a really great feeling tail, and I prefer stiffer tails.  They also released so easily I never really noticed how stiff they were until I got in the back seat in the Sierra Cement conditions, and then they would take me for a RIDE.  That said, I was always able to recover -- either by just throwing them sideways, or having them bounce me back into a balanced position and I never once fell or crashed into anything.  It’s something to be said if the tail of a ski can handle a 6’3”, 205 pound driver and still be able to bounce me back up from a back-seat position!
Personality:  They don't seem to have much, at first.  They aren't really lively, or poppy or anything.  They just seem to respond to your input and ski whatever it is you want to ski.  As per other reviews, they just disappear under your feet when you are skiing them well and scream bloody murder when you are not.  They do come alive the more aggressively you ski them.  They love to go FAST, but absolutely don't mind short radius turns while going slow either, even if they do start to feel a little planky at times in that sense, especially when you are tired!  They never hooked up on me or did anything unpredictable a single time.
Built-in ski instructor:  I had this sensation for the first time on any ski of having a built-in ski instructor.  It's hard to explain, but when I am skiing badly, they humiliate the shit out of me; they will buck you when you get into the back seat.  When I am skiing well, it's like being the skilled driver of a track-ready Porsche 911 GT3.  By comparison, the Bone’s are way more forgiving of balance fore-aft and general technique errors (which isn’t necessarily a good thing either, right?)   The BMX 108 is not hard to ski, and is certainly pretty user friendly straight out of the box, but you will be definitely wasting it's capability if you don't ski it WELL!
 
Summary:  
 
Overall, if I could sum these skis up in one word, it would be CONSISTENT.  They ski exactly the same at any speed, in any condition, all over the mountain.  The only caveat is you do have to be DRIVING them at all times.  This is not a ski that you put on and feel like you have leveled up in ability (how I felt the first time I skied the Bones).  
 
Rather, this is a ski that you put on and they asses your ability and tell you exactly where you are and what you need to work on.  But they also seem to coach you into proper form and technique (as long as you at least understand the basics of how you "should" be skiing).  I had a sense that I will progress faster on this ski than any other ski in my quiver.  At the same time, they are certainly an accessible ski for any Advanced skier with fair to good “ traditional” All-Mountain technique.  (Groomer-only “Experts” and new-school back-seat driving slarvers need not apply).  This is a ski that will definitely push you to get better if you pilot it with the right intent.  
 
Cons, if any:  
 
Heavy:  They do feel heavy with my STH 14's--they are fine before Noon, but after lunch I really felt them on my feet when I started to get tired.  While tired, they can start to feel a little planky making short radius turns, especially at slower speeds. Nevertheless they *always* respond to confident input and happily make any turn shape you want.  Don't get lazy.  They do not respond very well, if at all, when “driving” them from the back seat. 
Dampness: I wouldn't mind a tad more dampness, but I wouldn't want them to be much heavier, so not sure how any ski would/could accomplish that!  Hmmm, the same ski with a sheet of titanal on top?  
Lack of personality:  Sometimes I was hoping for more "personality," but I had the same feeling from my MX88's:  like most Germans and Austrians, they can sometimes seem a bit too serious and stand-offish when you first meet them, a bit too "know it all", a bit too "engineer-like" in personality; but in the same way, once you actually get to know them and become good friends (which can take awhile), you'll find out they are very loyal, good friends and can actually be a ton of fun!
 

 

post #15 of 22

Lovethesteeps you summed this ski up as well as anyone on epic or elsewhere and I totally echo your sentiments as someone who has owned a pair for 2 seasons. 

Love the built in coach comment, that was priceless. I couldn't agree more, by contrast I find my MX83 more forgiving and requires less grunt to ski it well. 

 

The biggest takeaway for people considering this ski or reading other Mag reviews is that most of them are fiction. From someone too light for the ski (Blister Gear - great reviews but they should have had a 178 not 188 at 155lbs or 183 if only Kastle could do a bigger size run...) or someone expecting to roll their ankles and have it pull them across the hill in a 13m arc (a la instructor or intermediate). For someone with a diverse skill set and some athleticism this is a very quick, extremely versatile ski for someone on a bigger mountain that doesn't putter around. There are way less compromises in this skis design than most of the 5 point skis and trendy stuff out there but you do have to show up to ski them. 

 

The one ski that might pull me off the 108's is the new FX104 because they had to go and sprinkle MX series magic all over it and the 184 would be a tad quicker in the trees and chutes.

post #16 of 22

I really enjoy my 187 MX108's.  All my shop friends tell me I'd like the FX-104's even more.  I've held off trying them, because I already have way too many skis.

post #17 of 22
Quote:
It's a bit of a catch .22...at my size 6'3', 220lbs I love the "playful, light, easy to turn" feeling of the Bones, but start getting bounced around in crud and find myself wishing for more dampness and stability at speed.  I'm pretty sure this is because of the soft-ish shovel on the Bone and it is just overall a very light ski.  On the 188 MX 88's I can't believe how smooth they are in rough snow and crud, but I long for just a tad more width and some tip and tail rocker to make turn initiation and slarving easier.

 

Great thread. This subject is my latest ski "obsession" and I am trying to work out what I should be skiing on. I am 6'4" and 250lbs, expert level. I ski the east coast and want to keep my quiver small and simple. That has meant a race ski for hard snow days (I own a 175 cm SL and a 192 GS ski) and a wide ski for soft snow days (a Ski Logik Ullr's Charriot, 101 mm wide, 178 cm). I recently skied conditions that made the charriots feel just too short for me (dense, rough, packed groomers with small moguls at high speeds). It has me thinking about what would be better as an all around east coast wide ski. The Charriot in a 188 cm length would probably be great, as I like the ski a lot even at 178 cm (quick turning, good stiffness for a wide ski, good width, great edge hold and carving "really" on ice). They are not that damp, though, I would describe them as fairly lively.

 

Anyway, I am thinking about the Bones, Brahama, Mantra, and just recently the Kastle FX 94. The FX 94 is beginning to catch my eye as a great all around ski for softer conditions and can handle bad conditions as well. (We rarely have a day with just one type of snow, especially without some ice). I am also coming to the conclusion that going a little narrower for the soft snow ski (94 versus 101), and maybe adding a really wide (130 ish) ski for fresh snow days would be even better. Uh oh, I caught the bug, please don't tell my wife. 


Edited by bttocs - 3/25/14 at 4:57pm
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

I really enjoy my 187 MX108's.  All my shop friends tell me I'd like the FX-104's even more.  I've held off trying them, because I already have way too many skis.

 

My WB  shop rat friends are also pushing me in that direction, and I'll be back there in April. Let's see if they'll be in the quiver for next year.

 

BTW, the Kastle rep for west Canada says if MX108's ever become available, they'll be NO problems selling them. Mine will go down to son #2 in Santa Fe.

post #19 of 22

I also really liked the resurrected MX98 that I demoed last week.  So many skis, so little time.

post #20 of 22
Very old thread but checkout the Ninthward THA's going for$159 at LevelNine sports.
I have a pair, am 6'3", 220lbs and love mine. I've used them in heavy NZ snow, on same when frozen over and in Japan
post #21 of 22

Next year Cochise (with camber) sounds like a legitimate contender in that category.  I'd love to compare the BMX108 with the new Cochise.  

P.S. One good big-mountain ski for the heavy guys is Nordica ElCapo.  

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
 

Next year Cochise (with camber) sounds like a legitimate contender in that category.  I'd love to compare the BMX108 with the new Cochise.  

P.S. One good big-mountain ski for the heavy guys is Nordica ElCapo.  

I'm really curious about the new cochise, I've heard blizzard messed up with the demo production and they don't have the same profile as the final version that's a bummer since there shouldn't be any demos available right now, it's kinda preventing me on pulling the trigger on this late season sales going on right now. I'm also looking at some info available on the on3p vicik and praxis freeride, good thing about the praxis is that you can get a custom stiff layup which might be good for heavy guys!

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › BMX 108 vs Cochise (or other Tahoe Crud ski for a big guy, 6'3" 220)?