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Do you feel like your life is on hold with an injury with a long recovery?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Today I scheduled surgery and physical therapy for a few months out. 6-9 months rehab. Maybe see the slopes in February.

Then, I had to put in my PTO requests (I don't get sick days) and then canceled my summer vacations.

Then, I took my planned weekend outings off the calendar. (Such as outdoor hiking photography workshops.)

 

Won't be buying a season pass.

Won't be trying to apply to get into the ski house.

Won't be looking for weekend lodging.

 

I bought a new helmet really cheap, but have put off other purchases.

 

Do you feel like you've had to put your life on hold and that your new job is PT? Or do I just feel like this since I'm single, no kids, and one furkid?

post #2 of 20

I'm not one to dwell too much nor wear it on my sleeve, but a few years ago I took what might have been my last run on an early January night. Conditions were pretty fabulous with about 12-14" of new snow and very few skiers on the hill for a night ski session. I got home, put the skis and ski gear away and started chemo the following day. Got back on snow the following season on January 9th skiing with an old and dear friend that I'd shared many miles of skiing with and was truly thankful. I was pretty weak and it took another couple seasons to really truly recover.

 

In the end, I pretty much view any day as a bonus, but it was very odd thinking back to that possible 'last run'. Skied the same hill during a night session about a month ago and got after it... Had a blast with a couple of friends, but still found myself transported back and thinking about where I had been and what I'd gone through. I guess in the end, chose you rehab goal, bust your rear end to achieve it, and you'll back on snow stronger than ever. Good luck and don't be shy about asking any and all that you know for support, and better yet, some training partners!

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the perspective check. I'm glad to hear everything is going well for you!

post #4 of 20
I had a long and difficult rehab after a skiing accident. Life definitey didn't stop. The secret is to make the rehab activities fun. For example I took up cycling, discovered an activity I really enjoy and made some new friends in the local cycling club.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

It's looking like cycling and swimming will be my best options for awhile. Have to stay away from my normal photography treks up a mountain.

 

And, of course, the furkid (beagle) will like the extra time with me.

post #6 of 20

I lost 2 1/2 seasons after my leg injury.  At the time it seemed like forever until I was able to get back on skis, but now it all seems like a distant memory.  Point being that in the grand scheme of life this will be but a blip on your timeline in the end.  All things will pass...

post #7 of 20
I am back this season after a full year off due to having a kid and having my ACL reconstructed. I remember feeling really bummed by the whole thing (the ACL, not the kid!), but now that I'm back on the snow, I don't really think about it.

To be fair, I've had some head games specific to the knee, but when it comes down to it, that leg is fine and (after MONTHS of PT) stronger than the leg with my original ACL. With all the focus on getting my strength back, I am 20lbs lighter than I was before I got pregnant, and the only head games I'm left with are the ones that were there all along.

Happy healing!!
post #8 of 20

^^^^^ Segbrown had posted some pics of you from Copper and Bumpfreaq and I were both commenting that you definitely looked like you had dropped a bunch of weight from the last time we had seen you (pre-baby).  Good to see you coming back even stronger after the injury.

post #9 of 20
Definitely on hold. My surgery was bigger than expected, so I just cancelled my scuba trip for the end of the summer. I should be able to ski by Christmas. Any chance of doing your surgery sooner?
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
I went with the end of April so I could get past a key deadline at work (I don't have a backup and don't need the additional stress of a software release.) I'm really glad I took the time to get a 2nd opinion and I don't think it delayed anything more than a week.
I have a tendency to do a lot of things alone (happens when your friends are busy with their kids.) I want to go on this one photo workshop up at RMNP, but meeting at 3 AM to climb a mountain to get good sunrise photos isn't exactly a wise thing to do during rehab. Other ventures alone just don't seem wise.

We have a family cruise planned over Thanksgiving, so that is my next vacation. I'm not one for sitting around on a boat but I guess it won't matter as much this time.

I don't want to lay out a lot of money on passes and lodging since I don't know how much I would use it. But if I don't get deals, I won't be able to do much skiing either. Not feeling like a win-win proposition at the moment.

First doc said I would be back at the beginning of the season--which I think was way too quick especially considering he wanted to do an allograft. The OS says February and he knows how to bring elite athletes back. I feel like he is being more conservative since he knows skiers and knows how I want to ski. (I felt like the other doc was a bit dissmissive of my intentions.) If I show good rehab and general fitness gains and lose weight, I think I could change his mind.
Going even more off topic, I am going to have some pre-op leg strength testing (Biodex isokinetic testing) just for myself with an athletic trainer or PT. I am a numbers gal so I want to quantitatively track my leg strength and compare quad to hamstring strength. I'm lucky that I can do the testing pre-surgery so I will be able to see where I need to get to initially and beyond.
post #11 of 20
The doctor I had for my surgery is on the conservative side for rehab, but he said I could probably ski by Christmas, although he'd like me to use a brace for next season. Can you get a pass with insurance in case you aren't ready?
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by valli View Post

The doctor I had for my surgery is on the conservative side for rehab, but he said I could probably ski by Christmas, although he'd like me to use a brace for next season. Can you get a pass with insurance in case you aren't ready?

 

I'm laughing since I'm saying to myself "didn't I respond to this" and then I realized it was on the Ski Diva. :)

 

I went back and looked at the actual insurance policy (not just what the web site indicated):

 

Pre-existing Medical Condition Exclusion Waiver
1. The season ski pass insurance is purchased within 30 days of making the initial payment for the season ski pass
2. All insured's are medically able to ski/snowboard when the season ski pass insurance cost is paid.

 

Guess I'll wait to see how things are going in the fall and buy a pass then if it seems like I'll be ready. I'll lose out on some of the early savings and perks, but, since I don't meet their exclusion clause, I'll be in a better position to make a decision.

post #13 of 20
You know, you could always hook up the ski school and do some teaching. Just a thought that might pay for your pass
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

You know, you could always hook up the ski school and do some teaching. Just a thought that might pay for your pass

 

Thanks for the idea. Was actually thinking of helping out with the Adaptive Ski program.

post #15 of 20

Now this is nothing related to skiing just desperate. So sorry. Its been four months since i tore my ACL while sparring. Have no idea how it tore but it just did. ( The fight wasn't even mildly aggressive!! Had a MRI scan to confirm the tear. My doctor actually recommended surgery. But i won't be able to speak to the surgeon until this coming friday. Like WHAT??!! Read alot of post-op horror stories and was wondering if i should delay the surgery. I'm having an important exam in mid may (will have to delay my graduation for a year if i were to fail the exam) Won't be going back to muay thai or any form of sports meanwhile. I can't... I'm a female and i don't have strong quad and hamstring muscles. However it is strong enough for me to be misdiagnosed and for me to carry out most of my activities without much trouble. Still i'm not comfortable with weight bearing on my left knee after it gave out on me just recently. And now knowing that i've a torn acl and is risking damage to other parts of my knee i don't even want to put any weight on it. This is causing much strain to my right leg. Any idea if i should delay my surgery until after exam? I'm really afraid my right leg will take a toll on me if i do so, especially when i still have to continue relying on it after my surgery. Plus i haven't been able to focus on my studies after knowing that my ACL is torn and might not be able to do sports ever again if my reconstruction were to fail. ( At the rate i'm going i might fail my exam even without the operation.) Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Feeling so lost now :S

post #16 of 20
One thing to remember is that there is often a higher concentration of horror stories on the Internet than in real life. The people who have an uneventful ACL surgery and recovery are too busy getting back to their lives and sports to post much. I've had other surgeries and was nervous before based on reading stories on the Internet, but both of those went fine. I just had a more complicated surgery (ACL, LCL, meniscus repair), and I can tell you that even three days out I'm glad I did it. The waiting and the uncertainty can be the hardest part. I would recommend seeing a few surgeons and finding one who has done a lot of acl reconstructions, look to rx2ski's post from how to find a surgeon. ACL surgery done with an experienced surgeon, followed up by lots of physical therapy, has a pretty high success rate, much more so than say, back surgery.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by valli View Post

One thing to remember is that there is often a higher concentration of horror stories on the Internet than in real life. The people who have an uneventful ACL surgery and recovery are too busy getting back to their lives and sports to post much. I've had other surgeries and was nervous before based on reading stories on the Internet, but both of those went fine. I just had a more complicated surgery (ACL, LCL, meniscus repair), and I can tell you that even three days out I'm glad I did it. The waiting and the uncertainty can be the hardest part. I would recommend seeing a few surgeons and finding one who has done a lot of acl reconstructions, look to rx2ski's post from how to find a surgeon. ACL surgery done with an experienced surgeon, followed up by lots of physical therapy, has a pretty high success rate, much more so than say, back surgery.

Urban legends are everywhere, yet 99% of people find that they are better & more fit for the experience!
post #18 of 20

I tore my meniscus (thankfully not anything major) in late December, missed the second half of surgery and had to move back east. I just got the surgery, and am healing up phenomenally. I can put all my weight on it and Its not swelling/catching nearly as much as before the surgery, the only thing I can't do yet is run. I should be running in about a months time however, and I will be moving back out west in a few weeks, and spending this whole summer/fall on strengthening my legs and the rest of my body. I plan on having a full season next winter and plan on going bigger than ever, as long as I keep keep skiing to 4 days a week instead of 6, dedicating the other 2 active days to stretching and strengthening the body.

 

I made the mistake of skiing almost everyday and forgetting to stretch and do range of motion exercises to stay loose and nimble. My biggest regret was getting all locked up, after so many hours skiing Halloween-Christmas, without stretching every day and keeping the upper body balanced. Not stretching, and locking up while sitting in front of the computer for hours after long days of skiing, was the reason I was injured. Next season is going to be a whole different story. I'm not going to be stupid. 

post #19 of 20
Becky, if you get after the rehab in a obsessive manner, you'll probably be able to ski in December. I walked the fine line between over stressing the knee and playing it safe. I still rode 3k miles on the bike between mid-April and mid-September (my surgery was mid march) and was able to hike 100 miles in Yellowstone/Grand Teton in a week at the end of Sept. I also rode my first sub 5 your century in the early part of sept.

I bought a e-stim device to do more retraining of my quad than I could in PT. my PT is a cyclist who understood my objectives.

Yes, your rehab might take longer, but you can control your part of the rehab.

I was skiing at the beginning of November. My OS recommended taking it easy at the beginning -- I interpreted that as the first run. That being said, I'm still skiing in a brace.

Mike
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

I know once the surgeon is done, it's 100% on me to rehab the knee and get in shape. Not sure why exactly my surgeon says slopes in Feb., when the initial ortho said December. The surgeon I'm going to use was able to diagnose my second problem--torn meniscus. I need to call the doc this week and ask how long I'll be non-weightbearing so I can set expectations at work. When I said I was a writer, I told him I can work at home initially. But as you know, it's actually a collaborative process. I spend a lot of time kicking people's butts to get things out of them and if I'm not physically in the office, it's not as effective. :)

 

It's up to me. This happened Feb 3. It's only two months ago, but it feels much longer. I'm ready to get started, but scheduling at work had to take priority. I have a concert planned with friends mid-April and I need to do some kind of getaway/mental vacation before surgery so I can go into this fresh. 

Although, the hardest part this week will be dealing with not skiing if this storm comes through as planned. ski.gif

 

Karen

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