New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tips on waxing equipment??

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'm hoping save some money on ski waxing and thinking about getting my own iron and stuff. I would greatly appreciate any recommendation on gear..e.g., what works well and last..thank you in advance!!
post #2 of 23

nochaser:

 

First off, welcome to EpicSki.

 

Plenty of information around here, but your thread should be in the Tuning area, not Ski Gear Discussion.  You'll get more responses there.

 

One of the moderators can move this thread if you let them know.

 

Mike

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I'm hoping save some money on ski waxing and thinking about getting my own iron and stuff. I would greatly appreciate any recommendation on gear..e.g., what works well and last..thank you in advance!!
post #3 of 23
Minimal investment

1) a used cloth iron, the thicker the bottom the better. 5 dollar
2) a piece of fine diamond stone. It is used to sharp the edge and remove debur. 10 dollar
3) paper towel, coffee filter or fibrelene 2 to 8 dollar
4) hertal super hot sauce wax. Best thing is low iron temperature needed for this wax, less tha 100 c. With no risk to burn the base. 20 dollar for 12oz.
Wax with fibrelene mothod.
post #4 of 23

Just start with Hotwaxing, 

Iron,

Wax,

Scraper

 

I would suggest though, the $30 to get a ski-specific iron is worth it. 

 

Next step are brushes, which are pricey for what they are.  You could get by with supercheap scrub brush/scotchbrite and the school of thought of  "snow will clear out the skis" 

 

=======

Edges, agree just stick with deburring and minor tuneup.   You can get by freehanding with just the diamondstone, or pick up a quick edge tool.  

===============================

Leave all the other sharpening to the pros in a once-in-a-season tuneup (usually have tuneup deals early season)  

 

After you get comfortable with the above basic techniques, then you can decide if you want to invest further in more tools.

post #5 of 23
I've been using a cheap clothing iron for a few years and it works fine, but if you can get a waxing iron for $30 go for it, I didn't because the cheapest is $60 here.

As for edge, get a guide (they aren't expensive) or don't sharpen them, there's no way you (or anyone) will have the precision to free hand within a degree.
post #6 of 23

I have an unconventional suggestion. 

 

Spend a little more and buy the iron with the digital readout on the handle.  Not because you need the precision temperature control - unless you are racing or using super fancy wax you don't.  But I thought that I was a brilliant value-operator to save some $ and get the simple Toko with a dial - and guess what, I can barely read the dial (the numbers are way too small and the dial is buried under the handle). 

 

I don't wear readers. . . . yet, but it is a complete pain twisting around a hot iron, at exactly the right distance, trying to read and calibrate the thing.

 

If you are under 40 you are probably saying  confused.gif ?    If you are over 40, you are probably nodding your head laughing.

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thank you everyone!
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewyM View Post

I have an unconventional suggestion. 

 

Spend a little more and buy the iron with the digital readout on the handle.  Not because you need the precision temperature control - unless you are racing or using super fancy wax you don't.  But I thought that I was a brilliant value-operator to save some $ and get the simple Toko with a dial - and guess what, I can barely read the dial (the numbers are way too small and the dial is buried under the handle). 

 

I don't wear readers. . . . yet, but it is a complete pain twisting around a hot iron, at exactly the right distance, trying to read and calibrate the thing.

 

If you are under 40 you are probably saying  confused.gif ?    If you are over 40, you are probably nodding your head laughing.

That's my next step... a heavier duty iron (for my snowboards)

 

the cheapo Swix which I have works fine (on skis)... the dial is just a reference point anyway, that you'll be adjusting as needed... puddle & smoke references.....

 

back to the OP....

 

during the off-season... spend some money here and there and build up the supplies needed

- Iron

- Scraper

- Gummi Stone

- Vise

- Cheap warm temp wax (for base cleaning)

- your actual wax you'll be running

- brushes (minimum of brass & nylon, imo, unless you're racing... then you need more)

- those giant rubber bands for the ski brake

- painter's tape

- sharper guides & diamond stones

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
I actually train/race with he local masters, and I do need some quality/durable wax iron and other accessory--any recommendations on the wax iron? Where do you get these supplies typically? Thanks!
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I actually train/race with he local masters, and I do need some quality/durable wax iron and other accessory--any recommendations on the wax iron? Where do you get these supplies typically? Thanks!

 

I have a Holmenkol iron.  I have used it since 2002.

 

Most of my waxes are from Holmenkol.  The wax is simple: Beta (red) for most conditions.  Alpha (yellow) for warm conditions. If you want to play with all the additives, go at it.

 

The best sources for tuning and waxing items are race shops.  Start Haus out of Truckee has a good selection.

 

Dennis

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Holmenkol makes some serious equipment...thanks for the suggestion.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I actually train/race with he local masters, and I do need some quality/durable wax iron and other accessory--any recommendations on the wax iron? Where do you get these supplies typically? Thanks!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/390566981860?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:VRI&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2661  Hard to beat $40 +free shipping, Continental Electric CP43001 Classic Dry Iron/polished aluminum sole plate, 1000 watt. 

post #13 of 23
Why buy a $40 clothing iron when you can get a dedicated wax iron for the same or less money? I think I paid $25-30 for my Toko iron and it works great.

Mike
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post

http://www.ebay.com/itm/390566981860?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:VRI&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2661  Hard to beat $40 +free shipping, Continental Electric CP43001 Classic Dry Iron/polished aluminum sole plate, 1000 watt. 
post #14 of 23
Those old irons have a lot more metal than your average ski iron, more stable temperature.
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I was thinking $140 digital From Toko based. It looks pretty legit. It has .5 inch base and a digital read. It's 2-3 times more expensive than recreational average irons--it's gotta be that much better in quality, no? Am I wasting money here? I hate to buy something and having to buy something else later. My budget is 150 or less for the iron. Any furter thoughts gents?... Skiing is no poor man's hobby...gees
post #16 of 23

IRONS

 

Firstly, be careful with clothes irons. Most newer models have a Teflon (or similar) coating that reacts negatively with Flouro waxes. Ask me how I know.

 

Secondly, simple old travel irons work great but their temperature settings are a guess. Unless you have a digital laser thermometer, setting temps to the choice of wax will be akin to being blindfolded, handed a dart, spun around a number of times, and asked to hit a bullseye.

 

The newer versions from the big players work great. The models advertised for "World Cup" have better electrics, and thicker base plates. They cost more, but will last a long time and give the best results.

 

VISES

 

Don't scrimp out here. While the consumer models work adequately, again the ones marketed for "WC" have a much better clamping design. The tip/tail stands are usually the same between "Consumer" and "WC".

 

BRUSHES

 

If you have  a Tack Shop in close-ish proximety, equine grooming brushes work very well and cost a lot less. Firm Nylon, Fine Brass, and Short Horsehair is what you need.

 

WAXES

 

Travel, storage, and hot scrape waxing can be done with cheap pure parafin found in the canning section of supermarkets.

 

I use a Low Flouro universal wax for my daily needs. I have a large selection of Low and High Flourocarbon, and Hydrocarbon waxes for more specific temperatures and conditions which get used for racing, or when I want to one-up my skiing peers on the cat-tracks. :D

 

TOOLS

 

You need a sidewall planer. It doesn't matter if you have brand new files, but if you don't get rid of the epoxy and/or fiberglass you will never get your skis sharp.

 

Use Chrome files. Initially more expensive, but they last considerably longer than cheaper ones.

 

Use machined aluminum file holders of the angles you will be using. Multi-tools are fine to pack along on a ski trip when you can't bring the tool box, otherwise keep it in the drawer. I use spring clamps to keep the file attached. Quicker to remove and clean the files and stones (and switch between them too) than a screw-down lock system.

 

SUMMARY

 

Spend your money wisely. Of course you can only get what you can afford, but if possible, buy the best where it makes sense. My old vise set ( SKIMAN Super Pro 3 point) was nearly 20 years old, had tuned 500+ pairs of skis and worked perfectly until someone thought it would be better on their work bench. I bought the newer version of the same brand to replace it. My iron is about a dozen years old. 

 

Don't lend anything out. Others won't respect your tools and will ultimately decrease their lifespan.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for itemized tips! What iron do you have?
post #18 of 23
The Toko T12 that you mentioned is a great iron. With irons its all about the base plate and the watts. The cheap irons dont have enough wattage to maintain temp once they hit a cold ski. T12 is 1200 watts and is pretty bomb proof.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post

Why buy a $40 clothing iron when you can get a dedicated wax iron for the same or less money? I think I paid $25-30 for my Toko iron and it works great.

Mike

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

Those old irons have a lot more metal than your average ski iron, more stable temperature.

That and i like the pointed front shape of a traditional clothing iron, i find it helps with drip accuracy of wax onto the ski. 

 

Also i would rather use a separate digital temp meter to take care of temp settings with just about any iron, one less thing to break on a expensive ski specific waxing iron - http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=235702-11906-IR607A%2fRL&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=3306066&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1 

post #20 of 23

I would tell you guy's if your just starting out and plan to do your own tuning for years, take the money you'll use to buy brushes and invest in the roto brushes.

 

I did back in 2000 and have not had to buy brushes yet.

 

They make brushing out the wax very easy. I do a few back and forth passes down the ski, then one full pass down one side (1/3), the one full pass down the other side (1/3), then full pass the down the center. Done.

 

 

I also use the $19.00 iron I got from Tognar tools years ago. I turn it on while I'm doing the bases. I found the setting where the wax melts and doesn't smoke. It works great.

 

Don't over think this.

post #21 of 23

There was video posted of Doug Combs doing a "quick and dirty" tune, really entertaining and using a simple pile of tools. You can do a fine tune using the tips above however. 

post #22 of 23
I would recommend buying good, but not necessarily the most expensive tools as cheap tools will annoy you for a long time before they break
post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I'm logging all of the specific tips on an Excel spreadsheet -- please keep your expert ideas flowing!!! At this point, I'm locked in on the iron at least -- Toko digital!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs