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Lubricant for Diamond stones

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I read repeatedly that denatured alcohol/water solution is the best lubricant for diamond stones. Some suggested Vodka, water, mineral oil, detergent and even saliva.

 

Where I live, denatured alcohol is not available at all.  So, I have a stupid idea - using WD40 as lubricant with diamond stones, is it a bad idea? 

 

What should I use as lubricant if denatured alcohol is not available?

post #2 of 17

Nothing grossly wrong with it, but I don't belong to the obsessive compulsive school of thought..  

 

WD40 is a light oil, basically kerosene.  It will have an odor and can get sticky/attract debris and dust when you leave it though.  You wouldn't be able to clean it off your stones unless you aggressively cleanup your stones with soap.  Some stones are porous and will absorb the oil and you cannot get the oil back out.

 

I would say just use water.   This is good enough to put a razor edge on a knife.  Yet somehow people get overly twisted up for ski edges, which is basically just steel.

 

If you use an oil lubricant, in general you've got the same function of clearing of debris away from the cutting surface, but also you are reducing the abrasiveness. But if you wanted to sharpen slower and more precisely, why not just use a finer stone.

post #3 of 17

I think the best lubricant is a brush. Every time I've used a lubricant I felt particles in the stone and the stone was harder to brush out. It has never felt right. High speed machines need lubricants but I doubt your generating that much heat.

post #4 of 17

I would not use WD40 for the reasons stated above plus it is not a good idea to get WD40 on your skin and if you use a spray bottle you are making a fine mist which you will be breathing, again not a good idea.

 

I put my diamond hones and stones in a cup of water on my tune bench where they are wet when I remove them and returned to the water after every use. I tune each edge one at a time, that is, I go through all the diamonds and stones I plan to use on that edge starting with coarse and finishing with fine. I find it faster/easier to change diamonds/stones in my edge guide than it is to flip the ski over and over again. The water keeps the diamonds cool when working and helps flushes the edge filings to the bottom of the cup.

 

I have used the commercial diamond/stone lubes from SVST and ARTEC and while they work, they are quite expensive and I have seen no disadvantage to using water.
 

post #5 of 17

I use Windex.  Works, sprays on easy, cheap.

post #6 of 17

isopropyl alcohol and water in a 50/50 mix.

post #7 of 17
Just water
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scavenger View Post

I read repeatedly that denatured alcohol/water solution is the best lubricant for diamond stones. Some suggested Vodka, water, mineral oil, detergent and even saliva.

 

Where I live, denatured alcohol is not available at all.  So, I have a stupid idea - using WD40 as lubricant with diamond stones, is it a bad idea? 

 

What should I use as lubricant if denatured alcohol is not available?

Yes, WD 40 is a bad idea. It will get all over your bases and make a mess. You don't want that in your bases.

Having said that, I've used it with diamond stones on metal items, just not skis. I would then make sure to get rid of it before using on skis.

My vote would be for water, or the recommended solutions but:

I recently spoke with a former Wcup tech. We're talking 15 hour days of tuning skis when on tour. I asked him about the lubricant, and he said he didn't use any at all. Just cleaned the diamond stone after.

post #9 of 17

I use water with just a bit of dish detergent. I use an old detergent bottle and give the stone a shot before I use it, then wipe the edge with a rag before I move on to the next grade.

post #10 of 17

No lubricant is necessary.  The purpose of the water is to clean the stone. Use the water before, during, or after, doesn't matter. An old toothbrush, or the toothbrush of your teenage daughter's boyfriend who got kicked out of his house and moved in with you, is nice to scrub small stones. 

post #11 of 17

The friction of diamond on steel creates localized heat that expands the metal and contributes to the loosening of the stones and thus accelerated wear on (in other words shorter lifetime for) the stone.  Liquids will dissipate the heat and reduce wear.

The liquid will also help to move metal bits.

No expensive liquids are needed.  Water is fine.  50/50 water/alcohol will dry faster and is better in that respect.  I keep a small spray bottle in my tool kit box and that does the trick.

 

http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning-tips.diamond-ceramic-stone-care/

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post

The friction of diamond on steel creates localized heat that expands the metal and contributes to the loosening of the stones and thus accelerated wear on (in other words shorter lifetime for) the stone.  Liquids will dissipate the heat and reduce wear.

The liquid will also help to move metal bits.

No expensive liquids are needed.  Water is fine.  50/50 water/alcohol will dry faster and is better in that respect.  I keep a small spray bottle in my tool kit box and that does the trick.

 

http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning-tips.diamond-ceramic-stone-care/

   Yes. This is just so!!! icon14.gificon14.gificon14.gif Some WC techs also may have at their "disposal" MANY expensive diamond stones which, if they wear significantly, are promptly replaced. I was told by a former WC tech, however, that he uses lubricant.

 

   zenny

post #13 of 17
Yep!! I recently stole one of my sister's hairspray bottles an that has made a world of difference in my tuning abilities.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the valuable comment.

post #15 of 17

HOme Depot Lowe's both carry denatured alcohol as regular stock!

 

50/50 with water works great.

 

No oil thanks!

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post

The friction of diamond on steel creates localized heat that expands the metal and contributes to the loosening of the stones and thus accelerated wear on (in other words shorter lifetime for) the stone.  Liquids will dissipate the heat and reduce wear.

The liquid will also help to move metal bits.

No expensive liquids are needed.  Water is fine.  50/50 water/alcohol will dry faster and is better in that respect.  I keep a small spray bottle in my tool kit box and that does the trick.

 

http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning-tips.diamond-ceramic-stone-care/


   Yes. This is just so!!! icon14.gificon14.gificon14.gif Some WC techs also may have at their "disposal" MANY expensive diamond stones which, if they wear significantly, are promptly replaced. I was told by a former WC tech, however, that he uses lubricant.

 

   zenny

Yes, I would agree also.

I used to use the Svst secret sauce, then the Artech.

The little spray bottles the sauce came in were fabulous.  I ended up just using water with them. You could partly clean the stone by spraying it, then use the toothbrush.

I don't quite get why you want to use alcohol/water mix. Alcohol dissolves wax no? Why get that on your bases?

post #17 of 17

While some waxes may be only slightly soluble in alcohols, as a solvent water/alcohol is very different; it acts more like water.  It will have no effect on ski wax.

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