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2012 Fischer Motive 88

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

2012 Fischer Motive 88

Length Tested: 176 cm

Dimensions/Turn Radius: 128/88/115mm  19m @ 176 cm

Camber :  Early Rise Tip/Rocker & Tail w/camber

Binding: Tyrolia Railflex FSX 12

Mount point: Rail center mounted to Ski center mark - skied both 28.5 boot to center mark and boot mark to -1.5 cm

 

 

Environment & Conditions:

Location of Test: 3 days Mammoth, 2 days Snowbird, 2 days Alta, 1 day Snowbasin, 1 day Solitude

Number of Runs: lots

Snow Conditions: ALL - boilerplate, hardpack, softpack, slush, wet fresh cement, setup refrozen, POW

Demo or Own: Own

 

Tester Info:

Username: moreoutdoor

Age: 64

Height/Weight: 5' 10+", 167 lbs

Ski Days/Season: 20-24

Years Skiing: '65 to 98'  then '2009 to date

Aggressiveness: tend to charge, prefer to ski with a light touch, but will power if the situation demands

Current Quiver: '09 Fischer Cold Heat 176 cm, '10 Rossi Sickbirds 185 cm, '09 Elan 99 w

'wood finish' 185 cm, '07 K2 Outlaw 181 cm, '00 K2 Axis Mod X Pro 188 cm, Nordica HR Burner Pro 178 cm

Home Area: Mammoth CA

Preferred Terrain : steeps, off-piste, trees

 

Deciding to purchase, without demo, the Fischer Motrive 88, was based on some extensive history riding Fischer Skis, as well as some very good reviews here in Epic.

What I was looking for?  A quick scan of my current stable shows I prefer skis on the longer side and with a high degree of stability and firm edging, and all have been traditional full camber. I've demo'd both early rise and full rocker models, but have not spent enough time to get comfortable or confident on them.

So I wanted to commit to finding a way to adapt my skiing to the characteristics and possible benefits of an early rise ski, somewhat shorter than I would normally choose.

My first 3 days on the Motive 88 were at Mammoth, 2 days after a 6 inch snowfall on top of 3 week old hard surface. So I had quite variable conditions, from well tracked soft pack on steeper sections and very firm hardpack on heavily skied sections.

I started skiing with my 28.5 boots mark centered to the ski mark.

What I found was a very fast turning, almost hooky ski when on edge. A bit too much swimming on low edge angles or flat running, and had a tough time finding the balance point around which I could vary the turn radius predictably. Considering the short length - 176 cm - with the additional shortening effect of the early rise tip, I felt any detuning would be a further detriment to turn predictability.

They were certainly easy turning and on the plus side, I can;t remember the last time I skied heavy mogul sections as easily and quickly. The Motives skied long radius turns well, but required just a bit more attention than I like. They reminded me of the quick reactions I could expect from my Nordica HR Burner Pros - a very fast turner, but also a ski not real easy to relax on when pressing the pace.

Thanks to my railflex setup, changing boot position is a 2minute operation. I could use either the gross adjustment provided by the 1.5 cm fore or aft single screw setup, or do 2.5 mm steps using the individual toe and heel piece adjustment.

Long story, short - after fooling with boot position, on the 1st afternoon, I found that adjusting the boot mark to be -1.5 cm behind the ski mark provided the adjsutments and improved' 'feel' I was looking for.

AT -1.5 cm, the skis now were no longer 'hooky', less swimming on flat running, and excellent almost no perceptible speed limit on long radius carved turns. Hard conditions edging was just a hair less than my Fischer Cold Heats and Rossi SickBirds, which both offer extremely tenacious edge hold on hard surfaces.

Overall the slight rearward set eliminated almost all of the reservations I had, without any significant loss in turn initiation or mogul performance.

The following 8 days on this ski just confirmed how good and versatile this ski really is.

After Mammoth, there was my 1st day at Alta, a day of hard surface skiing not often found, even back East. For the week before The SLC resorts saw 5 days of temps into the 40 & 50's ON THE MOUNTAINS, subsequently temps drops to where my 1st day in the Wasatch was in temps then teens and 20's, high winds and extremely poor visibilty. I tried a bit off-piste and found out why NO ONE was venturing off the few open groomed runs. By 10 am, even those groomed runs turned into skating rinks from the excessive traffic. A tough day, but the Motives did their job and still had some fun finding how to carve them on this hard surface.

After 5-6 inches of snowfall that night, the next day at Solitude was fun, with some variability. WIth 3 to 6 inches on top of real ice, there were plenty of instances where the transition would be abrupt from soft snow to ice surface. The Motives handled the transitions well, and responded well to a light edge touch when moving through transitions. They reminded me a little of the way my VR17s would motor easily through tough transitions.

After a few runs on the frontside, I moved to Honeycomb area which magically had deeper accummulations of 8-10 inches, making for some super pow which was virtually untracked. Within a couple turns the Motives were figured out. Skiing decent POW on them was a snap.

Next day Snowbird offered everything from soft, tracked in the trees to firm setup crud on open slopes like Regulator. Early runs in Mineral basin offered a couple hours of nice untracked/light tracked sections before more skiers found the spots.

Next day at SnowBasin - rain for most of the day on the lower half and wet cement further up. Truly a good garbage bag day.

Then it snowed again - heavy and continued snowing for the next 2 days. Fresh, Deep POW at both Alta and Snowbird - the days I remembered from prior visits.

The Motives were GREAT in the deep. The Rustler/High & Med Traverse and Wildcat areas at Alta had sections well above boot-top with some areas at just below the knee. Catherines was in great shape again. Snowbird the next day, had further new snow, The cirque was filled in again so that rocks were less an issue, GAD area, especially the trees was awesome deep, and staying high, skiers right off Peruvian was awesome deep and dry.

The Motive 88s, as POW skis were really great. The early rise allowed a very centered fore-aft balance and still easily unloaded to transition the turn. The light feel of the low-rise tip allowed easy turning in even the deepest pow.

It's really hard to do this review, because I should be able to find something I don;t like about the Motives; but I can't.

They really are a fantastic ski. Easy and not real demanding, with no apparent limit when you push them hard. They cut through crud and tracked, they hold an edge well, vary the turn radius with no problem.

Thinking about my 9 days on them, I can honestly say that I could easily use only these skis. Sure 'specialty' skis will do things just a bit better - but the Motives do most everything really well. They're not a ski which does everything at 75% well. More like 90% well at everything, which is good enough for me.

I was looking for a ski with a really broad spectrum, and maybe replace some of my current quiver. I didn't expect these.

Now it's gonna be hard to really spend any appreciable time on any of the others.

One Ski Quiver?  In my 6 very crazy variable days at the SLC resorts, I never felt I wanted anything else. And the highest mark for a ski, for me, is when you can just look down the hill and go, and not think about the ski.

Re: boot location. An adjustable binding/plate would be a real advantage on these, allowing each skier to tune the skiing characteristics to their taste. The ski offers real versatility in characteristics with not large variations in boot position.

I really like em!


Edited by moreoutdoor - 3/26/13 at 11:15pm
post #2 of 11

Thanks for the very detailed review!  An amazing variety of conditions you had them on.  I just picked up a pair of Motive 88s online for a great price and they just arrived Monday.  Looking forward to trying them out next week in Vermont.  Your comments are further confirmation that the Motive 88 was a good choice for me.  It will be a replacement for my well used Dynastar 8000s for the days in Vermont when there is some fresh snow and to take to Colorado on vacation. 

post #3 of 11
Just wondering if anyone skis these regularly in New England? I'm looking for something to replace my hard snow skis (184 Mantras). The lack of metal is a bit of a concern. I've demoed the Rossi 88s and liked them but can't find them at the price point I'm comfortable with.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastie View Post

Just wondering if anyone skis these regularly in New England? I'm looking for something to replace my hard snow skis (184 Mantras). The lack of metal is a bit of a concern. I've demoed the Rossi 88s and liked them but can't find them at the price point I'm comfortable with.

Finally got a day on these today at Killington.  Temp was 30 at the summit at 9AM so everything was firm and fast.  Only took about 2 runs  to feel right at home on them.  I was VERY surprised at the grip on the icy conditions and how well they carved.  As the snow softened a bit later in the morning, I tried some bumps on Needles Eye.  I was concerned the width might be a problem but it wasn't an issue at all..

 

The afternoon was like a different day.  Temps warmed into the 40s and there was corn and soff bumps everywhere.  The Motive 88s took it all in stride.  The bit of tip rocker seemed to help with plowing through some of the piles of slush.  I made some runs on a couple of the double black runs I hadn't hit all year - Escapade and Downdraft in the Canyon.  Fun!

 

All in all, I am delighted with these skis.  Very good grip on the slick stuff, good in the bumps, versatile in a variety of conditions, and doesn't punish you for less than perfect technique.  Will have to wait until next year to see how they perform in some powder, but with my weight (145 lbs), the 88mm waist width, and the rockered tip, I think they will be very good.  I would have not trouble recomending these for regular use in New England.  For under $350 shipped with bindngs mounted, its the deal of the year.

post #5 of 11
Sorry to bump an old post but I'm wondering how the 88s stack up against the new Rangers. Metal and tip and tail rocker sound like a win for me.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastie View Post

Sorry to bump an old post but I'm wondering how the 88s stack up against the new Rangers. Metal and tip and tail rocker sound like a win for me.

 

 

Fischer doesn't make a Motive 88.  They do make a Motive 95, my favorite single ski ever, and a Motive 86.  I skied the Motive 95 back to back with the Ranger 98 and much preferred the Motive to the Ranger.  I use the Ranger 108 as a powder ski and like it a lot.

 

The Rangers don't have metal.  Neither the Rangers nor the Motives have tail rocker.  I'm not sure what you are getting at?  Both the Ranger and the Motives have a very well designed early rise in the tip.

 

I started a thread earlier this season comparing the Motive 95 to the Ranger 98.  You could search it out.

post #7 of 11

the Motive 88 predates the newer Motive 86, which is a little lighter than the 88 due to its air tec ti construction.  I never rode the older 88, but have nothing but good things to say about my motive 86.  so much so, that I'm thinking I made need to get a motive 95.

post #8 of 11
I was specifically looking at the 2015 Ranger 88. Saw your thread on the 95, but don't get out to rationalize refilling that slot in the quiver. The 86s look good, but I'm not a huge fan of a lot of metal in skis, despite the fact I'm using these in the east coast. I really love my old Motive 88s. Great skis.
post #9 of 11
I would guess the Motive 86 is pretty similar to the older 88. The Rangers seem to be more soft snow biased while the Motives are biased towards firmer snow. I wouldn't make a big deal about the metal (or not). It's how it performs not the construction details. Depends how you will use the ski.

Still skiing my Motive 88s. They will need replacing in a year or two as the days of use are racking up.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

 

 

Fischer doesn't make a Motive 88.  They do make a Motive 95, my favorite single ski ever, and a Motive 86.  I skied the Motive 95 back to back with the Ranger 98 and much preferred the Motive to the Ranger.  I use the Ranger 108 as a powder ski and like it a lot.

 

The Rangers don't have metal.  Neither the Rangers nor the Motives have tail rocker.  I'm not sure what you are getting at?  Both the Ranger and the Motives have a very well designed early rise in the tip.

 

I started a thread earlier this season comparing the Motive 95 to the Ranger 98.  You could search it out.

 

 

Yep.  The Motive 95 is also my favorite One Ski Quiver.

 

Fischer has made another step toward the paradox of a ski that carves well but is also easy off piste.  I think no other ski does it so well.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #11 of 11
Any feedback on the Ranger 88 vs 90?
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