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No Mercy Critique of my Skiing?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi Folks,

 

Due to a motorbike crash I have been off the skis until last year but now I'm getting back out there and looking to improve my technique. I find I am at the point where I just can't get rid of a few final bad habits and my skiing doesn't improve. Let's not even talk about what happens in the bumps!!

 

Can anyone offer any pointers? There's something slightly out of angle with my inside ski on left turns (overcanted?) and I think my body position is out on the cross over from right to left turns (too much knee angulation on left turns?). Am I using too much hip?

 

Definitely going to book some kind of coaching for next years but if any Bears can offer tips it is greatly appreciated!!

 

 

post #2 of 12

Hi,

 

Glad you're back on the skis. What did you damage in your crash?

 

So you look pretty comfortable on that run, not struggling for speed control, what were your goals? Are you trying to get max angles with a clean carve? Or something else?

 

What I'm seeing is a clean carve to the right, but then a skid to the left, you flex your right leg well to develop angles on the right turn, but to the left you keep your legs a more similar length, whole body incline and push the skis away from you to develop grip. This may be injury or alignment related, it's hard to tell, do you have a bootfitter? 

 

With the right turn, it seems that you push your inside leg forwards and then drop the hip in, a stronger movement would be to try and hold your inside foot back a little more, but like I said, you do get some good angles on that side.

 

I'd work on making sure you can tip onto the little toe edge cleanly (without skidding/rotation) at initiation (some were sequential), and then try and get you flexing your left leg some more. To that end it might be an idea to develop more of a 'cross under' movement, so you don't fully extend both your legs in the transition. 

 

Hope that makes sense, you ski well and seemed to have a good grasp of what was going on, so I described that relatively technically, if you don't know some of terms, just ask.

post #3 of 12

First, those are turns a lot of skiers would aspire to. I'm having some challenges analyzing from the wobbling in the video, but will do my best.

 

As you turn right, you create a platform, roll on edge, and unbend your joints to load the ski and turn. Fantastic! As you turn left, you're creating a platform, but there's less edge engagement and less lateral lengthening through your joints to load the ski (your skis aren't travelling out sideways, they're staying under your body). Your stance also appears to be narrowing up just before you start your left turn, which makes it harder to get on edge and displace laterally. Check out these shots: 

 

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01 versus LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

 

 

Can you carve larger radius turns that are more completed (ie turning farther up the hill at the end of the turn)? I'd like to see you doing large radius carves before tightening it up. 

 

Could be a few causes and solutions - First I'd work on opening up your stance a bit with some cowboy turns. A wider stance will increase your confidence on higher edges (more margin for error if your balance is off), and will increase your potential for edge angles.  

 

Then I'd take you through creating those edge angles with either power plows or j-turns. Really want to see more turn completion as well since that will set you up for getting lateral on the next turn. 

 

To create more lateral extension, we would work on Bend and Stretch turns - bend all joints through the end of the turn, and stretch in all joints as you enter the next turn. The stretch happens more forward-laterally than up. Regular radius. Gradually shorten the radius, but continue to complete each turn. 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 3/24/13 at 1:38pm
post #4 of 12

Is the hill slanted to the left?  That could explain why your right hip gets closer to the snow than your left. 

post #5 of 12

SJ,

 

What was injured in the crash?

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi guys,

 

Cheers for the replies. I broke and chipped my navicular bone in a few places which has limited my lateral foot movement and slightly the range of flexion I have. Boots are a complete nightmare to get in and out of on the left foot (Doberman WC Softs) but it doesn't stop me trying the bumps.

 

Yes, hill is slanted to left a bit, it's a super smooth blue run so not exactly steeps but good for filming on.

 

Re Jim: "Your stance also appears to be narrowing up just before you start your left turn, which makes it harder to get on edge and displace laterally"

 

Yeah that definitely seems to be the case and I hadn't really noticed it before. On the steeps I sometimes get myself caught out on hard carves when the skis suddenly shoot me out from one and turn and I end up in the backseat so maybe need to let them cross under more and absorb it.

 

I really like this video so the aim was to compare and see what I was doing wrong

 

 

What are cowboy turns? J Plows or Power Plows? (Going to google them)

 

Thanks for the feedback

 

 

Simon

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by S J View Post

Hi guys,

 

Cheers for the replies. I broke and chipped my navicular bone in a few places which has limited my lateral foot movement and slightly the range of flexion I have. Boots are a complete nightmare to get in and out of on the left foot (Doberman WC Softs) but it doesn't stop me trying the bumps.

 

Yes, hill is slanted to left a bit, it's a super smooth blue run so not exactly steeps but good for filming on.

 

Re Jim: "Your stance also appears to be narrowing up just before you start your left turn, which makes it harder to get on edge and displace laterally"

 

Actually that was metaphor, but we're saying a similar thing, I just think you could get good performance with that narrow stance, rather than widening it. Often people mistake vertical separation (what I was talking about with flexing the inside leg) with a wide stance, you just need to use that inside ski/leg better. 

 

As for the drills, cowboy turns are very wide stance turns, which allow you to get high edge angles at lower speed as the inside leg holds you up, power ploughs have a similar goal, except in a snowplough/wedge, the inside ski is flat whilst the outside ski is edged and pressured heavily, an element of steering is involved here. J-turns are carving to a stop. All very good things to learn.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Cheers Jim, I think a photo like this one perfectly illustrates what you mean by none wide stance, his actual stance is pretty narrow he's just getting so far over, ah I'll keep dreaming

 

How do racers get their thigh lower than their inside leg, are they actually counter rotating that inside leg or what? Looks painful

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 85

post #9 of 12

The biggest benefit of Cowboy turns is that they reward movement of the center of mass to the inside of the new turn as an enabling movement for tipping. Depending on how your navicular has healed, this could be no big deal or excruciatingly painful. The whole idea is accentuate the feel of rolling the foot onto the new edge. One thing you will find about Cowboy turns is that an up unweighting move to release the old turn (like we see in the clip) does not work because the new inside ski being outside of shoulder width blocks movement into the new turn when the move is a lateral lean into the new turn. The trick with Cowboy turns is to collapse the new inside leg to allow the hips to move over the new inside ski, then tip the skis into the new turn instead of trying to go up and over.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by S J View Post

are they actually counter rotating that inside leg or what? Looks painful

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 85

 

 

The pelvis... It's not painful. Ted just has an extra level of an accessable range of motion (combined with the given strength, athleticism, balance, etc.... that they all share) that has many of his competitors scratching their heads over. 

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by S J View Post

Cheers Jim, I think a photo like this one perfectly illustrates what you mean by none wide stance, his actual stance is pretty narrow he's just getting so far over, ah I'll keep dreaming

 

How do racers get their thigh lower than their inside leg, are they actually counter rotating that inside leg or what? Looks painful

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 85

 

Tip him upright on flat bases without moving his skis--how wide is his stance then?

 

How wide is his stance at transition? Look at frame 3:

 

post #12 of 12

Dude, that guy just skied right into you! 

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