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Why I'm never buying Volkl again with pictures! - Page 5

post #121 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post

I definitely agree with the notion that the skis are beat to hell. From what the OP described I have about the same time on my new Bacons this season, and they still look new... Regardless, those bases do look very thin, you can see through to the core in picture no?

 

 

Saw a new pair in a shop. You could see the black stringers underneath the white ptex, but was not as defined as the above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Let's not forget this guy... they're triplets...

 

 

I hope his mirror has built in Photoshop. (That can't be real....please no...An apt analogy for the condition of the skis in question. Wait....is that the owner???)

post #122 of 128

^^ It's a mug shot and yes, it's real.  Went viral about 8-9 years ago.

post #123 of 128

A couple of things.....

 

First, ski manufacturers use base material that comes on large rolls. While it is possible that a small section of a roll of base material was somehow out of spec, that is not likely. Therefore, were the base material to have been out of spec, it would be reasonable to assume that they got a whole roll of out-of-spec material and, thus, the problem would be more widespread. Note, unless they are publishing an extraordinarily in-depth array of specifications, there is no way to know what "spec" is for this model, during this particular production run, at the time it was made. And were they to have spec'd a thinner base material for this run, there is no guarantee that such a decision would create an arguable fitness for purpose issue, as the product is for skiing on snow, not rocks (undesirable is not necessarily unfit, from an implied warranty perspective).

 

Second, just because it is unlikely (though not impossible) that a single pair of skis would have out-of-spec base material, that does not mean the base could not be out of spec. Skis do not come out of the press finished, nor do they always come out flat. It is entirely possible that this pair, or even one of the skis, could have needed (or gotten, even if not needed) extensive grinding at the factory, before the OP ever got them.

 

Overall, though, I would say that we do not have nearly enough information to make any sort of intelligent assessment. Yes, the skis are in rough shape. Yes, there are obvious maintenance issues. None of those really has anything to do with the OP's question, which is essentially along the lines of "should my bases be this thin without having been ground?" Again, not enough information. The best repair would be to cut out that section and base-weld in a new piece (well, actually, at this point it needs more than base work, so assuming the restorative work were done...). Were the OP to do this, he could then measure the base material thickness and provide some meaningful information. A 2-D picture from the top is not illustrative.

 

In short, it is entirely possible that the base on this ski is abnormally thin. But not likely. We cannot offer any meaningful assessment of this from the information given.

 

The fact that the carbon stringers are visible through the bases has no bearing on this question, nor does it offer any meaningful insight. The translucence is simply a function of the pigmentation in the plastic.

 

Just because the fine folks in warranty departments hear things like "I was just skiing along" and "I never even hit anything" so often that they even have pet acronyms for these lame excuses for obvious damage, doesn't mean that every now and then it isn't actually true. However, absent some obvious empirical evidence, the prevalence of skier fault returns means they are not likely to believe it. Obvious neglect and poor maintenance are only going to strengthen the likelihood of that negative response.

post #124 of 128

@ Lemming. Are you a lawyer?biggrin.gif A fair assessment indeed. To the point. I purchased a pair of Atomic SL skis a number of years ago on line. Had them mounted and skied them a few months. Took them in to a friend/ski tech. for a tune. He calls me said the bases were ultra thin. Really. Sent them in and got a new pair. A happy ending.

post #125 of 128

He may be, but he started a ski company.

See this post in the East Coast Tree Ski thread:

Originally Posted by Lemming View Post
 

Couldn't one tell roughly from the thickness of the metal edge? Everytime the base is ground/sanded the edge is also.

post #126 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

He may be, but he started a ski company.

See this post in the East Coast Tree Ski thread:

Originally Posted by Lemming View Post
 

Couldn't one tell roughly from the thickness of the metal edge? Everytime the base is ground/sanded the edge is also.

 

Not a lawyer, but I spend a lot of time with them in my day job (ski co. doesn't even pay its own bills just yet.... :-)

 

Edge thickness would be a good proxy, but since they look like they came off the wreck of the Titanic, we may not be able to get a very precise reading there. (Hyperbole, yes, but we have to have some fun with you, OP  ;-)

post #127 of 128
I vaguely remember one manufacturer's video saying something to the effect of they don't use the first and last few feet of the rolls because they aren't consistent. Maybe this was the case here.
post #128 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemming View Post

 

Not a lawyer, but I spend a lot of time with them in my day job (ski co. doesn't even pay its own bills just yet.... :-)

 

Edge thickness would be a good proxy, but since they look like they came off the wreck of the Titanic, we may not be able to get a very precise reading there. (Hyperbole, yes, but we have to have some fun with you, OP  ;-)

Coming soon!

Discovery and NatGeo channels to make 30 minute show titled "The Bridge Down Under". Show will examine in excruciating detail the Volkl Bridge and it's tendency to rust in salt water. How deep can it go and how fast will it rust??

Also, stay tuned as we look into the questionable base material and indifferent response by the manufacturer.

Nancy Grace to host and will get to the truth of what the owner really did with this ski. Was a backyard belt sander used after an internet purchase?? Tune in as Nancy gets to the bottom of this.

 

Nancy interviews owner of thrashed or defective Volkl Bridge:

nancy_grace_036.jpg

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_local_namesblog/2010/01/nancy-grace-hypocrite-extraordinaire.html

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