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Racing MA please

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/s4dd5vuyua0q75v/Feathers%20Steve%20-%20March%202%202013.mov

 

53 years old, Been racing for 20+ in beer leagues.

Raced a couple of years in High school.

 

Thanks, Steve

post #2 of 11

Hi

 

Nice skiing Steve. We are racing in the same age group 50-54 even if I dont know what 20+ means. Anyway, going fast and looking fluid. Nice. What stands out to me as something you could improve on is how your skis track in the snow. Here two things come into play. Line and movements. You need to pick a line where you turn a bit sooner and rounder. Now you are going quite straight at the gate and then skidding as you pass the gate and try to redirect your skis up towards the next gate. You need to be on your new edges sooner and really try to carve all the time. To me it looks like the surface is fearly soft so you deffinetly need higher edge angles and more angulation. You need more tipping from your feet. Also in the tuck. Notise that you counter act with your hips a lot. This is not bad but you should also tip your feet. Otherwise you have bad tracktion. Try to work more with your knees. Especially your inside knee. Ive been doing the same and I have managed to bring that inside knee a bit more to the inside for more parallel shins, better traction and less A-framing. Something you seem to be doing as well. Check your alignment. In soft snow like this you could easily get away with one deg. Hope this helps.

 

T

post #3 of 11

Good skiing, too round, see what LeMaster has to say about cutting off the line...

post #4 of 11

A couple of observations.  Watch that inside shoulder, you are dropping it in the turn, particularly on the right footers which loses the pressure on the ski.  Also try to quiet the upper body, you are using a lot of upward motion in the transition rather than rolling the ankles onto the new edge.  This loses time and pressure and you get caught on the inside ski on a couple of occasions

post #5 of 11

Two things:

 

- All of the above comments are good, but there's a simple, fundamental way to improve what you're doing, and it's something our coach has us work on all the time. Basically, what you're doing is tipping in and then pivoting the skis to catch your momentum and regain balance. What you want to do is to not ever lose your balance. Start by getting the angles with your feet, knees, and ankles, then get against the ski to make it bend. Or, put another way, edge, then pressure.

LeMaster's four fundamentals: (1) Quiet upper body. (2) Early new edge. (3) Bend the tip to start the turn. (4) Pressure predominantly on the outside ski.

- Technique is important, line and tactics are just as important if not more so. I ski perfectly clean sometimes, but that approach often turns out to be perfectly slow. Yep, ya gotta carve turns, but you have to cut off the line, not by going straight and late, but by trying to make those clean turns down the hill.  Another way to think of this are "Aim out, turn down." Or as one of the coaches in one of the local program said, "The racer who spends the most time in the fall line is going to be the winner."

post #6 of 11

Looks pretty good. 

 

As stated previously, lots of wasted up and down motion.  Line is late and low.  See how you get into the back seat?  You are below the gate in the soft stuff.

 

Quicker edge to edge trasitions.  You appear to be holding the carve for too long.  You can straighten your line  - looks turny on the top - but you need to get on the gates. 

 

Best.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

TDK6, 

20+ = more than 20 years.

Believe it or not I have been trying to move my line up the hill....Late and straight has more or less always been my MO but when I was younger I could get away with it more.

I have been working on the parallel shins ( inside knee, big toe little toe ) for a while, but as soon as I step into the starting gate it all seems to fall apart....

 

ScottSkier.

The inside hand / Shoulder is another issue that i have been working on for years.

It is a bad habit that I picked up when I first changed to shaped skis.

My son was very young and I used to just ski behind him going slow, leaning over doing snowboard type carves on Sl skis. I do a fair amount of Schlopy type drills to try to correct this. Do you have any other drill suggestions?

 

 

SR55,

Good advice. I have lost my "pinch" and am rising out of the turn as opposed to moving down the fall line. Funny, I used to get comments on how much ankle and knee I used.

I sure don't see it there.

I agree, "too round". I like that "Aim out, turn down" Comment. It makes a lot of sense.

 

 

Pat,

Points taken.

I have actually been trying to ski very round and hold on to my carve longer this year and my times have sucked every time. The "round" to try to force my line further up the hill.

The holding of the carve on advice a few years ago  from someone MUCH faster than myself that also happened to be a PSIA examiner.

 

 

I obviously need to gate train more. Unfortunately that is almost impossible for me at this point in time.

 

Thanks all,

Steve

post #8 of 11

the Bizkit!

post #9 of 11

"Round" and "early" aren't the same thing. See what LeMaster says about cutting off the line...the green zone vs. the yellow zone vs. the red zone, where moving from the green zone to the red zone is moving your initiation further down the rise line. Doesn't matter where you are on the rise line, that's where you need to have the new edge and start pressuring the ski...later and you're late, sooner and you're turning into the gate and will have to double turn. Note that the further you are down the rise line, the quicker you'll have to be. One of the local Masters coaches said "Most Masters racers need to spend less time in the weight room and more time on plyometrics and other drills that improve flexibility and quickness."  Your technique can always improve, but it's pretty solid...just think about building the angles with the foot, knee, and ankle, then getting against the ski instead of tipping in and pivoting the ski. Outside of that, and it's not hurting you in a big way, you can make much more hay by improving your tactics than you can obsessing about technical minutae. Remember, ski racing is about going fast on the shortest line possible. I ski speed events because I like them, but they're also good for your GS and even your slalom. I make it a practice to get out on 201 SGs or bigger once a week when it's not crowded and the snow is clean to do what one of my teammates said: "Every day, I try to take at least two runs where all I think about is going fast."

 

cool.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Firby View Post

TDK6, 

20+ = more than 20 years.

Believe it or not I have been trying to move my line up the hill....Late and straight has more or less always been my MO but when I was younger I could get away with it more.

I have been working on the parallel shins ( inside knee, big toe little toe ) for a while, but as soon as I step into the starting gate it all seems to fall apart....

 

ScottSkier.

The inside hand / Shoulder is another issue that i have been working on for years.

It is a bad habit that I picked up when I first changed to shaped skis.

My son was very young and I used to just ski behind him going slow, leaning over doing snowboard type carves on Sl skis. I do a fair amount of Schlopy type drills to try to correct this. Do you have any other drill suggestions?

 

 

SR55,

Good advice. I have lost my "pinch" and am rising out of the turn as opposed to moving down the fall line. Funny, I used to get comments on how much ankle and knee I used.

I sure don't see it there.

I agree, "too round". I like that "Aim out, turn down" Comment. It makes a lot of sense.

 

 

Pat,

Points taken.

I have actually been trying to ski very round and hold on to my carve longer this year and my times have sucked every time. The "round" to try to force my line further up the hill.

The holding of the carve on advice a few years ago  from someone MUCH faster than myself that also happened to be a PSIA examiner.

 

 

I obviously need to gate train more. Unfortunately that is almost impossible for me at this point in time.

 

Thanks all,

Steve

post #10 of 11

There is not much that I can add better than those who have already posted except for an phrase that I have used in several sports and holds true here as well.

 

If in doubt...Attack.....if it kills you it was the wrong decision.

 

Point being is that attacking the course/pitch causes the body to shift forward which will help in your turns as your wt is transfered forward.  Lose that commitment and you automatically shift your wt slightly back and everything is late or set back (as SS, SR55 and Pat have indicated in a better fashion than I ever could).

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firby View Post

TDK6, 

20+ = more than 20 years.

Believe it or not I have been trying to move my line up the hill....Late and straight has more or less always been my MO but when I was younger I could get away with it more.

I have been working on the parallel shins ( inside knee, big toe little toe ) for a while, but as soon as I step into the starting gate it all seems to fall apart....

 

ScottSkier.

The inside hand / Shoulder is another issue that i have been working on for years.

It is a bad habit that I picked up when I first changed to shaped skis.

My son was very young and I used to just ski behind him going slow, leaning over doing snowboard type carves on Sl skis. I do a fair amount of Schlopy type drills to try to correct this. Do you have any other drill suggestions?

 

 

SR55,

Good advice. I have lost my "pinch" and am rising out of the turn as opposed to moving down the fall line. Funny, I used to get comments on how much ankle and knee I used.

I sure don't see it there.

I agree, "too round". I like that "Aim out, turn down" Comment. It makes a lot of sense.

 

 

Pat,

Points taken.

I have actually been trying to ski very round and hold on to my carve longer this year and my times have sucked every time. The "round" to try to force my line further up the hill.

The holding of the carve on advice a few years ago  from someone MUCH faster than myself that also happened to be a PSIA examiner.

 

 

I obviously need to gate train more. Unfortunately that is almost impossible for me at this point in time.

 

Thanks all,

Steve

  smile.gif  Wish I did!  That is a habit I unfortunately am guilty of as well frown.gif  

 

My preference is actually for airplane turns to discipline on this.  Also helps to minimize the upper body movements you need to work on.  

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