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Rossignol 74 tuning help

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

Came back from the second trip this winter and decided to buy the axes. New to sking, I do green and easy blues. Just bought the Rossi 74 and atomic boots with 80 flex rating. Read a lot on the forum and the manuals, and was busy with adjustments. 

 

Put the forward pressure right (back indicator half - half), set the DIN to 4.5 according to my calculations. What else needs to be done on a new set for it to be ready.

 

PS : I will be taking it to the shop anyway before the next season to tune, just trying to learn the science, all the hobbies I have, I do everything connected to it, science is 80% right all the time, 20% is  the input of experience :) my view only.

post #2 of 15

I would suggest you have the DIN's set by a shop, take both boots and the skis and let them do it right. Think of it as, it's better to pay them then the co-pay to the hospital.

 

For tuning, you'll need.... well a few items, plan on spending around $400 if you hava good bench to clamp the vises too.

 

Read a few of the threads on here and then make a list of questions.

 

A good thread is the one about. whats the edge angles on K2 Rictors. A few of us give good info there on tuning a shaped ski.

 

Check out Tognar tools for a great catalog and tips.

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
I will take it to a shop anyway, not trying to save 25 bucks.

I am just trying to learn and I thinks here will be all the ski geeks here. When I started skiing the rental guy set the DIN at 4.5 and after getting better I asked him that according to DIN my number can be 4.5 to 5.5 for a beginner, should it be ok to set the number at 5 now since I am skiing some blues. The guy did not have a good explaination or didn't want to share, but he said leave it at 4.5, that's what the chart says.

I will look up the tools as I want to start waxing my own skis. I want a vise, brush set, 2 files for side and base, and probably a grind stone. I have been reading it a lot, and everything looks doable after the reads.
post #4 of 15

Also check out racewax.com

post #5 of 15

Yes, as you get better/stronger skiing, you'll want the DIN's higher. It's based on several factors. It's all on here.

 

You don't need a stone grind unless the skis are really messed up.

 

My 80+ day's Volkl Kendos have never been to a shop for a tune. I flatten the bases with a Ski Visions base flattener, I use a 1 degree metal guide to knock off the high burrs before I wax.

 

I use a Panzor file only when needed to clean up the 3 degree edge I set.

 

After every ski day the use a 100grit Moonflex diamond stone to touch up the edges with the steel 3 degree guide and a $3.00 clamp from Home Depot.

 

The secret sauce is only 50/50 denatured alcohol and water, I use a old tooth brush to clean the diamond stone.

 

The idea is to not take to much metal off. Also don't de-tune a shaped ski.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

Yes, as you get better/stronger skiing, you'll want the DIN's higher. It's based on several factors. It's all on here.

 

You don't need a stone grind unless the skis are really messed up.

 

My 80+ day's Volkl Kendos have never been to a shop for a tune. I flatten the bases with a Ski Visions base flattener, I use a 1 degree metal guide to knock off the high burrs before I wax.

 

I use a Panzor file only when needed to clean up the 3 degree edge I set.

 

After every ski day the use a 100grit Moonflex diamond stone to touch up the edges with the steel 3 degree guide and a $3.00 clamp from Home Depot.

 

The secret sauce is only 50/50 denatured alcohol and water, I use a old tooth brush to clean the diamond stone.

 

The idea is to not take to much metal off. Also don't de-tune a shaped ski.

Max  100 grit is too coarse for a person's only diamond stone as is a panzer file for routine maintenance.

 

If I had one diamond stone it would be a 200 or 400 grit. Side edge file a 4" Swix (1st or 2nd cut) or  Holmenkol (13 Teeth per Centimeter or 15). Personally I like the Holmenkol.

 

I only use a panzer when initially setting side edge bevel and back filing to start @ 7 degree 2 passes and then if I want a 3 degree, I use the panzer at 4 degrees until sharp. Then use my final bevel angle at 3 degrees with one of the 4"files.

 

Of course this process is used when initially setting the side edge bevel.  All you need to maintain is a 1st or 2nd cut file and a 200 or 400 diamond.

 

I would only use the 100 grit diamond for extreme nicks or gouges smooth out any impact hardened spots before using the file.

 

OP also needs an hard Arkansas or surgical or true hard stone and a hard gummi. stone, to remove hanging burr and final deburring of the edge.

post #7 of 15
totally agree, Atomicman! wish I had something useful to add besides parroting wink.gif

OH...! to the op, make sure to wipe down your skis after every time out, then lean them against the wall, bases facing out (this helps water run/drip off). this is one of the other ways to maintain your skis! smile.gif

p.s. DONT overdo it with the panzar!! removes considerable material...

zenny
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

totally agree, Atomicman! wish I had something useful to add besides parroting wink.gif

OH...! to the op, make sure to wipe down your skis after every time out, then lean them against the wall, bases facing out (this helps water run/drip off). this is one of the other ways to maintain your skis! smile.gif

p.s. DONT overdo it with the panzar!! removes considerable material...

zenny

 

You know how we are in the good old USA. If a little is good, more must be better!!!

 

Zen, just your agreement is good enuf for me! Thanks!

post #9 of 15

Oh yea, I only use the panzar a couple times a season if needed.

 

The 100 grit, I use for 3/4 passes with not much pressure.

 

I do use a 200 every now and then also.

 

My daily touch up takes about 5 minutes total. It's not like I'm taking off a lot of material.

 

Even my old AC40's have more metal left in the edges after about 150 day's on them then my buddies skis which get a season tune. He's getting new skis every year it seems. Our skis sit next to each other at the ski house in VT.

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the replies, I have been reading a lot and here his what I think I will need initially. I am looking at amazon since I have an account there.

3 brush set - brass, nylon and horse hair
Multi tuning tool with file and 3 grind stones
A vise ( don't know which one, but there are several choices)
Metal and plastic scraper
Iron ( not sure yet, I read some using Walmart $5 one, I have a te,p gauge and can set it to 110 F, any advice)
All temperature wax, herself

Am I missing anything, I will just start by waxing and sharpening, when needed.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
I meant hertel wax, not herself ( this is auto correct creating all confusion)
post #12 of 15

Try Lee Valley Tools for metal scrapers (better quality and cheaper) than ski scrapers.  Yes they are the same only one is for wood the others is "marketed" skis.

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitelight View Post

I meant hertel wax, not herself ( this is auto correct creating all confusion)

 

Should be fine, unless you're skiing in very cold, fresh snow (Breckenridge, northern Vermont) or somewhere with a lot of manmade snow.

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks,

What cold temp wax for Breckinridge etc should I use ?
post #15 of 15

I like Toko S3 Blue and Purl Blue.    Maplus Race Base Medium (violet-purple) has quite a few fans on this site.   

 

You'll probably get recommendations from the  Dominator, Holmenkol, racewax.com users shortly; I have very little knowledge of those.    There is also a separate hardener sold by Hertel  specifically for this application - I have not used it and so cannot comment.

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