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Blizzard Bonafide and Rossignol Experience 88 - Page 2  

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

Having skied both the Bone and E98 of these a bunch, I did find that both were pretty stout for my weight, both less than ideal. I don't know what the construction differences were between the E88 in 178 and the E98 in 180, but I found the former to rip under my feet, be super nimble, quick, easy to ski, powerful. One of the best all-around skis I have ever tried. The E98 in 180cm felt good in wide open crud and new snow, but a tank in short turns, less than ideal in bumps.  Kevin loves it though in 188cm, he has 40lbs on me, he also likes the Bonafide, whereas I lean toward the softer E88 and Kabookie.  

 

I would say the E98 is more technically oriented than the Bonafide. It feels more powerful at the top of the turn, a better carver, more powerful at speed, but yes, also more demanding.  The Bonafide has a larger sweet spot, is more playful and soft-snow oriented.  I think which one you like would depend on how you ski and what you like to feel in the turn, feedback (more or less).  

The difference between skis like the E98 and the Bonefide on the one hand and skis like the E88 and the Kabookie on the other: the metal maybe? The E88 has none, I believe, nor does the Kabookie.

 

Also, in my experience, the stiffness of a ski is relative to its lenght. A longer ski of the same construction always seems more forgiving, flexible and pliable to me. I suppose metal sheets inside the ski only grow with it in one dimension (length), and not in thickness as well. 

post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post

If you REALLY want useful advice, listen to qcanoe and mtcyclist.  You've got "over-excited, out-of-control, I-wanna-buy-skill" written all over you. 

As someone once said..."It's not about the bike".  Same goes for skis. 

Take your E88's to a shop for a good tune and wax job, then spend some quality time with them.  There's nothing wrong with them that a new ski will fix.

Agreed.

 

OP you need to slow down.....you mention multiple crashes with some being at high speed one being on your head.....I think you should slow down and work on basics for a bit.

 

My $0.02

post #33 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swerny View Post

Agreed.

 

OP you need to slow down.....you mention multiple crashes with some being at high speed one being on your head.....I think you should slow down and work on basics for a bit.

 

My $0.02

Well maybe you should have read the whole post before giving your 02. I appreciate all the responses so don't get me wrong. I have had a TOTAL of 5 falls since I came back after 16 years on skis. I fell 3 times the FIRST DAY out. So out of the 5 falls 2 where on jumps. I have had 1 high speed crash that I hit my head out of the total of 5. I don't think 2 crashes over jumps to be a get back to basic issues myself. So maybe I'm wrong, but I don't feel that way. Im almost 40 and jumps are not what Im looking for. They found me. LOL Like I said Thank you for the response though.

post #34 of 55
Thread Starter 

My dealer helped me out by taking the Bonafide back. I ended up going with E98 in a 172 and love it. If I went by the weight chart I would be in 180 or higher. Not sure why I like my skis short, but I do I guess maybe they are easier to move around. Im happy so all is good.

post #35 of 55

Ya they are easier to move around for the most part.  

 

I loved the Bones but went with the E98 (180cm) because I got such an awesome deal on a new pair.  Sadly, the season is done around here.  SIGH.

post #36 of 55

I just got the E88s in 186cm yesterday.  They're an awesome ski!  I picked them up while skiing at Sugarloaf.  Love those skis!

post #37 of 55

Those may be good skis but I think you are going too wide for your local conditions.  Skinnier skis will work better on the hard-pack.

 

Check out this thread

 

 

Skis over 75mm underfoot in the East...why?

http://www.epicski.com/t/118885/skis-over-75mm-underfoot-in-the-east-why

post #38 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medium Al View Post

Those may be good skis but I think you are going too wide for your local conditions.  Skinnier skis will work better on the hard-pack.

 

Check out this thread

 

 

Skis over 75mm underfoot in the East...why?

http://www.epicski.com/t/118885/skis-over-75mm-underfoot-in-the-east-why

If thats the case why would the 98 and the Bones get such good ratings for hard snow grip in all the magazines ?

post #39 of 55
Wr
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

Hmmmm.
Wrong wax
post #40 of 55

Skinnier skis work better on the hardpack if you know what you're doing and have solid technique.  Gotta stay on top of them, drive them, high energy, can be a bit touchy on occasion.  Depends what you want though, I like a few 98s on the hardpack if I want to dial things down a bit and relax instead of digging trenches.  Nothing "wrong" with that compared to skinny skis, it's just different.

post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Royce View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Medium Al View Post

Those may be good skis but I think you are going too wide for your local conditions.  Skinnier skis will work better on the hard-pack.

Check out this thread


Skis over 75mm underfoot in the East...why?



http://www.epicski.com/t/118885/skis-over-75mm-underfoot-in-the-east-why


If thats the case why would the 98 and the Bones get such good ratings for hard snow grip in all the magazines ?

I have friends who think the Nordica Hell and Backs are good on hard pack. I own the skis as well, but grew up on eastern ICE and all I say to them is, compared to WHAT? Yeah, you can ski them on hardpack, but it is more tiring than using the right tool for the job. Skinnier skis are much faster edge to edge and require way less work to get that edge in. Stiffer skis hold better as well. Just because I can use the H&B's to ski the stuff.. And even enjoy myself.. doesn't mean I don't have MORE fun with the right equipment. You have to evaluate the mountain and the day and then pull out the right skis from your locker. Fortunately I have a locker and can always change my mind.. If you're going on a vacation and don't want to bring more than one set of skis, it's a tougher decision, you bring what will handle anything okay, even though some things might not be handled the best.
post #42 of 55

Ice can be challenging no matter what you are skiing on.  Good technique helps.  Give your current skis more time.

 

I have skied the Bushwacker, an 88 width version of the Blizzard, off-piste and really enjoyed it.  Don't know if it would be my main ski on the east coast though.  I think I would prefer something with a more traditional camber profile. 

 

I did not like the Rossi E98 at all, again skiing it mainly off-piste.  Felt very stiff although it did change directions very quickly.  If I was on the groomers maybe I would have enjoyed it more. 

 

 

I agree with the others that at 5'9 and 250 lbs, a 170 length might be a little short for you. (I am 175 lbs and ski on 178.)  I also agree that the E98 is going to be a more technically demanding ski than the Blizzards. 

post #43 of 55

i say in addition to the rossi  E88 (not 98) esp for out east, also consider

the nordica steadfast...sure it's not as burly or damp or heavy as the E88, but wow what a carver for its width

....head rock and roll at 93 is supposed to be a fun ski, too.

 

best thing is to demo a bunch of them for a few hrs at a time to really get to know them in different conditions...a few runs on each doesn't cut it, imo.


Edited by canali - 3/25/13 at 7:34pm
post #44 of 55

I busted out the Skiing Magazine 2013 Gear Guide just for kicks.

 

The skis you are considering, Rossignol Experience 98 and Blizzard Bona Fide, are top performers in the "All Mountain Explorer" category. The magazine describes this category as for powder, chop, groomers, trees, bumps, and bowls. Most of these skis are in the mid-90's underfoot.

 

The category before this in the magazine is "All Mountain Surgeon". These skis are designed for slicing up the front-side and are generally in the 80's underfoot. This group includes the Rossignol Experience 88, the Rossignol Pursuit, Line Prophet 85, Volkl Kendo, Elan 888, Nordica Fire Arrow and others.

 

While all of these skis will work... I am going to make a generalization here and say that the top (wider) group is better for a West coast skier and the more varied terrain they encounter while the bottom (skinnier) group is better for an East coast skier. You should pick a tool based on the conditions you are most likely going to encounter.

post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Royce View Post

Well maybe you should have read the whole post before giving your 02. I appreciate all the responses so don't get me wrong. I have had a TOTAL of 5 falls since I came back after 16 years on skis. I fell 3 times the FIRST DAY out. So out of the 5 falls 2 where on jumps. I have had 1 high speed crash that I hit my head out of the total of 5. I don't think 2 crashes over jumps to be a get back to basic issues myself. So maybe I'm wrong, but I don't feel that way. Im almost 40 and jumps are not what Im looking for. They found me. LOL Like I said Thank you for the response though.

I read the whole thread thanks.

 

By all means....keep skiing 60 MPH on your new skis coming off a head injury from a "HIGH SPEED CRASH".

 

"Slow down" is a perfectly reasonable response to this.

 

I'm by no means an expert, but it sounds like the skis you are on are all too short. I'm 3 inches taller than you but 40 pounds lighter and I ski 178's and would look within 2-3 cm of that size for any new all mountain/GS ski.

 

But what do I know, you have tried various skis and can't seem to settle on any particular one.

 

Happy hunting....and helmets are made to be replaced after absorbing an impact big enough to leave you with a lump on your head.

post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Royce View Post

It just seems slower then Volkl's and Rictors. I have a app for speed in some other info on my phone. The best speed I got was on the Volkl's at 64.5 and the low was 59.2. Then on the 88's I got 52.1 and 51.1.

I'm sorry, but nobody, not even Bode Miller, should be skiing 65 mph on-piste at a resort unless you are on a race course.  And you brag about that while self admittedly being overweight, not at 100% health and with only a few days under you after being away from the sport for 16 years, all while being a self-described INTERMEDIATE skier on DEMO skis!  

 

50mph+ is already dangerously fast on groomers, even for expert skiers, while there are other skiers around.  You could catch a rut and hit a tree, a child could come out of nowhere, someone could unexpectedly turn into you and you will KILL someone or yourself at that speed and your weight.  You are like a freight train coming down the mountain at that weight and speed and you do not have the training, athleticism or equipment to be able to shut down that kind of speed on demand.  For your own safety and the especially for the safety of others around you, please SLOW THE HELL DOWN!devil.gif

 

I can't believe anyone on this forum would ignore these above points before giving this guy any advice about ski choice at all!  

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

I can't believe anyone on this forum would ignore these above points before giving this guy any advice about ski choice at all!  

 

You obviously didn't read all the posts because some of us did point out that he sounds out of control and needs to slow down.

post #48 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

I'm sorry, but nobody, not even Bode Miller, should be skiing 65 mph on-piste at a resort unless you are on a race course.  And you brag about that while self admittedly being overweight, not at 100% health and with only a few days under you after being away from the sport for 16 years, all while being a self-described INTERMEDIATE skier on DEMO skis!  

 

50mph+ is already dangerously fast on groomers, even for expert skiers, while there are other skiers around.  You could catch a rut and hit a tree, a child could come out of nowhere, someone could unexpectedly turn into you and you will KILL someone or yourself at that speed and your weight.  You are like a freight train coming down the mountain at that weight and speed and you do not have the training, athleticism or equipment to be able to shut down that kind of speed on demand.  For your own safety and the especially for the safety of others around you, please SLOW THE HELL DOWN!devil.gif

 

I can't believe anyone on this forum would ignore these above points before giving this guy any advice about ski choice at all!  

Before coming on my post and bashing I guess you should know me and my ability. So shut the F--ck up !! Nobody asked where I got the speeds on GPS for all you know it was on closed course. Don't pick your point and bash me jack ass

post #49 of 55
To the OP: you mentioned avoiding bumps because of your knees. IMO it should not hurt your knees to ski moguls. You don't have to zip line them. You might be hitting them too fast, turning too abruptly and skidding into the next bump to slow down for the transition to the next turn. Moguls do require more flexion and extension than a groomer but it's still based on good technique.

Your L3 instructor friend may have given you some good pointers. It's probably not enough focused instruction IMHO. I think taking several lessons will help work out kinks and eliminate any bad habits, which may not be obvious to you. I know I've got mine.

BTW: welcome to Epicski. Listen , learn, have fun, be excellent.
post #50 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

 

You obviously didn't read all the posts because some of us did point out that he sounds out of control and needs to slow down.

I seem out of control did you read all my posts ? I said I was out of control on 1 ski and one 1 condition. People really should read all the posts and comprehend what i'm saying then post.

post #51 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

To the OP: you mentioned avoiding bumps because of your knees. IMO it should not hurt your knees to ski moguls. You don't have to zip line them. You might be hitting them too fast, turning too abruptly and skidding into the next bump to slow down for the transition to the next turn. Moguls do require more flexion and extension than a groomer but it's still based on good technique.

Your L3 instructor friend may have given you some good pointers. It's probably not enough focused instruction IMHO. I think taking several lessons will help work out kinks and eliminate any bad habits, which may not be obvious to you. I know I've got mine.

BTW: welcome to Epicski. Listen , learn, have fun, be excellent.

Thanks for a nice post. Giving solid advice not bashing. People take notice I thought that was what this site was for.

post #52 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swerny View Post

I read the whole thread thanks.

 

By all means....keep skiing 60 MPH on your new skis coming off a head injury from a "HIGH SPEED CRASH".

 

"Slow down" is a perfectly reasonable response to this.

 

I'm by no means an expert, but it sounds like the skis you are on are all too short. I'm 3 inches taller than you but 40 pounds lighter and I ski 178's and would look within 2-3 cm of that size for any new all mountain/GS ski.

 

But what do I know, you have tried various skis and can't seem to settle on any particular one.

 

Happy hunting....and helmets are made to be replaced after absorbing an impact big enough to leave you with a lump on your head.

Still not sure about that.  I was going 60 on skis I had since the end of October Thanks.  By the way I had gotten a new helmet I do read the little white label on the helmet when you buy one. Since when do I need one ski for all conditions ? I was looking for advice on a ski and was looking for advice back not to be bashed. Maybe my bad for not giving a better 02 on my ability.

post #53 of 55

If I can be so bold ,I ski a lot of the places you ski and my findings have been that skis of varying width are best suited for the conditions of the day....soft snow....go with the Blizzard ,hard snow go with the Rossignol. (and this is based on the two skis you have (Bonafides vs. Experience 88) This may vary trail to trail so you kind of have to plan your day out....the Bonafide is going to be hard to beat on soft snow days (fresh and spring) but with spring comes boilerplate base,plan your trip and trails accordingly.    You want to rip the groomers? Go with the Experience 88, got a fresh dump of late season pow ? Go with the Bones, these are both all mountain skis but terrain and tactics dictate where one ski is better than the other....oh and about the speed thing....hard snow is faster.....all other variables being equal it may not be the skis but the conditions of the day.......that's my two cents.

post #54 of 55

62mph is the speed Travis Ganong hit winning the Super G at Nationals last week. 24 years old, extremely fit, closed course with double safety fences, speed event rated helmet, skiing since he was a little kid.

Sorry you feel bashed when people tell you to slow down, but some of us or our wives, kids, and friends are likely to find ourselves on a ski run with you.  We have the right not to have you kill us. EVERYTHING about your post screams out-of-control, over-your-head. For your sake and ours, I hope your speed app is way off.

post #55 of 55
I'm not a ski shop person or an instructor, and I haven't seen a video of your skiing. But, I don't think someone living in NH needs a ski with 98mm under foot. Like I said before, it's just that much more ski to move from one edge to another on conditions that demand reaction time. Add to that the early rise and those things ski "short". If the conditions you want to ski on are bullet proof groomers, why would you look at a ski designed for deeper snow (more 3D skiing) rather than solid edge control? You are making things hard on yourself.

Now, add to that an absence from the sport for long enough that ski technology, and therefore technique, has evolved, and your muscle memory is not just rusty, it's out of touch.

Now let's further complicate things by adding in conditions which take finesse and precision, not speed and brute force.

My recommendation? SETTLE on a pair of skis, figure out what they like and don't like and where you have to adjust your technique to get the most out of them. Then start doing controlled, "perfect" turns on all types of terrain. You will learn far more doing this than trying to overcome technical flaws with testosterone.
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