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Colorado or bust

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

planning a trip to co.  next year.  i have a timeshare in the Interval timeshare system that shows properties in vail/winter park/breckenrige areas.

i have a more than a few detals to finalize...

1. preferred ski area

2. list passes.   buy them in advance,  now, in the fall?... etc

3.ideas?

 

btw, i consider my self an intermediate + east coast skier (ha)...   with limited powder experience.

 

thanks a bunch,

 

gerry

post #2 of 23

Noticed this thread after I answered in your other one.  Better to continue here . . . 

 

 

Are you thinking of taking advantage of the MCP, or just want to get out west with the hope of catching a snowstorm?  People who have done the math are finding that usually needs 5+ days of skiing to make the MCP worthwhile if only going to one destination on the list for one trip.

 

For Colorado, people talk about the Epic Pass as a good deal if skiing enough days.  Definitely worth considering sooner rather than later if those are the places you want to go.

 

http://www.snow.com/epic-pass.aspx

 

What month are you thinking about?  Although I have RCI timeshare weeks, I tend to use  VRBO more for ski trips out west.  Mostly because I'm spoiled and would rather be in a house/condo with full kitchen and washer/dryer for a ski week.  Being retired gives me more flexibility about timing.  Also, if I have friends who can join me then having 3BR/3BA works out well for everyone.

 

Going to a place that isn't as close to Denver might be worth the extra travel time/cost.  For instance, Steamboat or Crested Butte.  What is the reason you are set on Colorado?  Does II have anything in the SLC area?  Although plane fare is slightly higher, the SLC airport is a lot closer to major ski resorts than Denver.  Plus there is less likelihood of travel delays due to snow . . . unless you change planes in Denver. wink.gif

post #3 of 23

MCP = Mountain Collective Pass

http://www.themountaincollective.com/

 

The MCP is unlikely to be useful to you.  Getting everyone on board this far in advance to buy one would be hard.

 

For your timeframe, Park City is an obvious destination outside Colorado for a mixed ability group that is intermediate and beginners.

 

Have the people in your group been at high altitude before, as in over 8000 feet?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

looking to go late jan/feb.  figuring there will be enough snow by then.

 

it'll probably be a group of 4-6 people; the timeshare would cut down thwe costs drastically.  Also, some of the croud have less experience than others, so i thought those areas would have enough other things for them to do if they weren't upto skiing every day.

 

btw, MCP?

 

G

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

probably not.  a few have skied europe, but nothing extreme.

post #5 of 23

Most people are fine at high altitude if they are sensible and read up a little on what to do to avoid problems, but it's something I consider when planning ski trips out west.  All I get is a headache the first day or so.  But I know that I can't ski all day long until the second or third day just because I'll be more winded until I adjust.

 

That may be a reason to choose to sleep some place lower than Breckenridge.

post #6 of 23

Ref: the altitude issues. I had trouble with the altitude during this past Christmas week trip. Arrived Denver 7PM (from coastal New Jersey, 17 ft above sea level), drove to Summit county (8500'), tossed and turned through the night (thought it was due to excitement, later learned it's one of the symptoms of altitude "sickness"), skied (not very well) Breckenridge the next day.

 

Spoke to my MD about my experience after getting home - he's also a skier - who suggested that spending the first night in Denver at 5,000 ft to help your body get acclimated seems to help. I'm going to try that during upcoming trip at spring break. Keystone/Breck/Copper are close enough to Denver to get up early the next morning and not miss too much time on the slopes. And because Friday and Saturday are off nights for the airport area hotels (their prices are higher Sunday through Thursday nights when they cater to business travelers) there are reasonable prices at some pretty nice places.     

 

I'll let you know how this works for me. 

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

thanks for the heads up.  let me know if it works out better for you.

 

thx,

gerry

post #8 of 23

Glad to hear about your trip out this way, FYI some of the areas are already offering next year passes of various kinds.  There are some season pass deals that are reasonable, Winter Park/ Copper Mountain unlimited all year for $419, includes six days at Steamboat and three at Monarch.  Must buy by 4/15 I think.  Vail/BC/Keystone/Breck/A-Basin for $529.  Four packs are popular out hear for ones that won't ski quite as much.  Some of these are available in the fall, but you get a few extra perks if you buy in the spring.  Whatever you spend, good idea waiting till late Jan to Feb.  If you avoid Presidents Day weekend, February can be great. Not warm enough to melt, but late enough to increase the base and maybe hit a big storm.

Hope your planning goes well, enjoy!

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

OK...  so i'm booked at breckenridge 2/8 to 2/15/2014

 

should i start looking at lift tix now, or wait a bit?

 

G

post #10 of 23

Might as well do the calculations now for the various pass options.  Even if your friends can react fast enough, you could take advantage of any deals that expire mid-April.  In general, pass deals end either before the end of this season, mid-summer, or early fall.

 

Have you ever looked at Liftopia?  That a good way to get tickets for certain places for just a few days.  Don't have to make a decision quite so early.

post #11 of 23

Altitude can be a problem . We had one person in our group that spent 2 days (and a $600 medical bill ) recovering. A lot of the issues were dehydration level. People just don't realise that they need to FORCE themselves to drink more than they want for the first 2-3 days. A night at Denver airport is a good idea if it works.

 

Re the ski passes.  I got the Epic ski unlimited which has gone up to $689 for next season. I will get the Epic local pass. For that (if you book ahead) you also get buddy passes or ski with a friend passes that can work for couples in your group. The buddy passes at present are about $81 for a day .

The great thing about a season pass is that you find yourself doing 3 hours skiing  , instead of nothing for a recovery day .

 

As you are at  Breck, unless you want the variety of Vail BC etc, I would get the Epic  pass that is good for Keystone, Breck and A Basin.

post #12 of 23

There are also Epic 4 & 7 day passes

 

http://www.snow.com/epic-pass/info/epic-day.aspx

post #13 of 23

You have two choices - buy a Summit Value Pass ($439 now with Buddy and Ski With a Friend discount tickets you can share) or wait and buy a multi-day ticket online before you go out.  Probably not a great difference for only a week of skiing.

post #14 of 23

GerryF - hope you're still monitoring this - just rememberedI I offered to let you know how spending arrival night at Denver airport hotel helped with altitude adjustment during my spring break. Happy to report that I think it helped a lot - I really didn't have too much altitude issues. I worked out a little extra in the weeks leading up to the trip also. 

 

Thought you'd also be interested to know that due to less altitude issues I was able to explore much more of Breck mtn this past trip and have to say I'm a convert - I was pretty impressed. Enough so that I'm putting Frisco on the short list of potential winter retirement homes.   

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sr31aj View Post

Thought you'd also be interested to know that due to less altitude issues I was able to explore much more of Breck mtn this past trip and have to say I'm a convert - I was pretty impressed. Enough so that I'm putting Frisco on the short list of potential winter retirement homes.   

 

Come visit in the summer too.  The weather is amazing, and there is some of the best hiking, mountain biking and road biking in the world.  You can even sail on Lake Dillon.  Summers are amazing in Summit County.

post #16 of 23

There's that saying about mountain homes. I came for the winter, but stayed for the summer. There's some truth in that. 

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

thanks...   but i wasn't able to get a stop-over in denver.   going directly to breck.   i'm hoping the pre-trip workouts and skiing will minimize the effects.

G

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

thanks...   but i wasn't able to get a stop-over in denver.   going directly to breck.   i'm hoping the pre-trip workouts and skiing will minimize the effects.

G

 



Ugh!  Don't count on it, unless you're coming from a location that has some altitude.

 

We went out at the end of March and I thought I was pretty good beforehand with all the skiing/running done prior, but to no avail.

 

We had Camelbaks as everyone says to stay hydrated, but even they didn't help.   Nearly passed out a few times after short runs down moguls.

 

Be careful and take it easy until you realize your condition.  Hopefully it doesn't hit you too hard.

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

thanks...   but i wasn't able to get a stop-over in denver.   going directly to breck.   i'm hoping the pre-trip workouts and skiing will minimize the effects.

G

 

Being fit will help, but some people are just better/worse at acclimating than others.  There are medications you can take, but they have side effects, so that's usually only worth it if you know you have trouble otherwise.

 

Lots of water and avoiding alcohol and caffeine will help.  I had more trouble in Summit County than other places, probably because you're above 9K feet even at night (and I didn't stay in Denver the first night).  Just listen to what your body is saying and don't push it too hard the first few days.  Keep an eye out for anyone in your group who might be having symptoms of altitude sickness.

post #20 of 23

As a flat lander who has spent many a night in high altitude places such as Breckenridge, Telluride, Aspen and Keystone, I have grown to LIKE staying at the high elevation places.  BUT (and this is important), I highly recommend you start drinking a ton of water a day before you make your trip to the mountains and continue doing so throughout your trip.  At first, you will be making tons of trips to the bathroom but that's okay.  My first day of skiing is usually interrupted numerous times by having to take pit stops but those become less frequent each day.  The headaches are almost always due to dehydration so as soon as you start feeling one coming on down 12 oz. of water and you should be okay.

 

As for why I like staying at high elevation, I am a runner and I have found that even a four day trip can make a difference in running performance/fitness when I return to sea level.

post #21 of 23

My understanding of altitude sickness is that it is not something terribly related to conditioning- Olympic athletes can get laid out, morbidly obese couch potatoes can have no issues.

 

If you are not going to take an acclimation day,  try to have your first day be lower in intensity.  It starts a trip off on a very bad note to feel sick and then have the malaise hang around the entire trip because members of your group pushed to too hard day 1 trying to make the day "worth it."

 

Its also a really, really bad idea to drink when you get up there for the first night or so. I'm 1) acclimated and 2) have never had altitude sickness issues even when sleeping at 11,000+ feet, but I definitely become more and more of a lightweight the higher up I am. At 5,000, 7,000 feet, I normally start to feel a buzz around 3-5 beers, depending on whether I am drinking Budweiser or real beer. At 10,000 feet, drinking 2 of anything gets me feeling it.

 

At sea level, I've put away a 12 pack in an hour, felt a buzz for 10 minutes, and was right back to sober.  I gave up on drinking to feel intoxicate dbecause it was a full time job. I'm sure BAC would have shown a different story, I'm just talking about how I feel, and I feel a DEFINITE correlation with effects of alcohol and altitude, field tested over and over and over...

 

If you want the worst hangover of your life, fly in, drive up, don't drink water, ignore the signs of altitude sickness, and get smashed to celebrate the start of your ski vacation.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

planning a trip to co.  next year.  i have a timeshare in the Interval timeshare system that shows properties in vail/winter park/breckenrige areas.

i have a more than a few detals to finalize...

1. preferred ski area

2. list passes.   buy them in advance,  now, in the fall?... etc

3.ideas?

 

btw, i consider my self an intermediate + east coast skier (ha)...   with limited powder experience.

 

thanks a bunch,

 

gerry

 

 

if you can ski the toughest stuff in the east the toughest inbound stuff in Co is going to be easy. It will only look harder.

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GerryF View Post

thanks...   but i wasn't able to get a stop-over in denver.   going directly to breck.   i'm hoping the pre-trip workouts and skiing will minimize the effects.

G

Being a low lander who goes to Colorado frequently all I can say is don't count on it.  Altitude sickness is a funny thing.  There have been times when my wife was sick as a dog and I felt fine.  In fact I had been to CO many, many times and never felt the slightest bit of altitude sickness, and then BAM, I went with a friend of mine for a week long trip and almost couldn't function for three days.  The last few times I have been I have had no problems at all.  Best advise is take it easy for a few days and drink lots and lots of water.

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