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Killy 1968

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

An acquaintance emailed me the link to this footage of Killy in the Grenoble Olympics that I thought a few might enjoy.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhvgSMHAZgw&feature=player_embedded

post #2 of 13
Thanks for that! That was the cleanest copy of the DH I recall seeing.
post #3 of 13

That was/is a great reminder of what once was.  Remarkable racing, great competitors, controversy, what else could you want at one event.  I'd forgotten about the little flags on wires that were used to outline the course, before the invention, or at least use,  of blue dye.  In 1973 or '74 I skied the Roche Cup DH  after the final racer snatching up the flags as I skied down the course.  I think I just got those on the right side of the course.  At least one of the Mahres was entered in the race for the first time ever.  I'm sure it was an eye opener for him as far as tough racing went.

 

Slats

post #4 of 13
Luxuriating in bittersweet nostalgia is one of the great benefits of advancing age.
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Luxuriating in bittersweet nostalgia is one of the great benefits of advancing age.

Hmm, I don't see anything bittersweet in this, just some beautiful skiing!

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTNSKIS View Post

That was/is a great reminder of what once was.  Remarkable racing, great competitors, controversy, what else could you want at one event.  I'd forgotten about the little flags on wires that were used to outline the course, before the invention, or at least use,  of blue dye.  In 1973 or '74 I skied the Roche Cup DH  after the final racer snatching up the flags as I skied down the course.  I think I just got those on the right side of the course.  At least one of the Mahres was entered in the race for the first time ever.  I'm sure it was an eye opener for him as far as tough racing went.

 

Slats

Well put, JTNSKIS.  It was also the first time a skier wasn't afraid to stand up to Avery Brundage, who I believe was so pissed off that he  missed the medal ceremony. The  Killy win was the inflection point...the beginning of the end for Brundage's anti-commercialism stance.  Soon after skiers could be photographed with manufacturer logos.  A few years later the IOC realized it was ridiculous to have a well-paid Italian postal worker (Gustavo Thoeni) who was skiing within the IOC's silly rules race against a US competitor who was poor since he had no state sponsored job.  All this "commercialism" crap started to end with Killy, allowing a few men and women racers to become rich every year from endorsements. 

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

Well put, JTNSKIS.  It was also the first time a skier wasn't afraid to stand up to Avery Brundage, who I believe was so pissed off that he  missed the medal ceremony. The  Killy win was the inflection point...the beginning of the end for Brundage's anti-commercialism stance.  Soon after skiers could be photographed with manufacturer logos.  A few years later the IOC realized it was ridiculous to have a well-paid Italian postal worker (Gustavo Thoeni) who was skiing within the IOC's silly rules race against a US competitor who was poor since he had no state sponsored job.  All this "commercialism" crap started to end with Killy, allowing a few men and women racers to become rich every year from endorsements. 

If I'm not mistaken Brundage was so outraged he demanded the French (Killy and Perillat, I think) return all their medals. Killy is supposed to have responded by daring Brundage to come and try  taking them back.

 

I think the IOC gave in to commercialism a few years later because it was itself interested in getting a cut of the television proceeds.

 

It was pretty ridiculous. The great Finnish xc racer Mantyrata was supposed to be a "customs agent" or something, being paid by the government during his racing career and I think a lot of other countries' ski racers got similar support. I remember some kid on the US team nearly getting kicked off the team because he had made a Christmas present of his team sweater to his father. Here was one of the best skiers in the world who was so broke he couldn't afford to buy his father anything. They got rid of Brundage about that time.

 

The attitude goes back. Grace Kelly's father, one of the best rowers in the world and an Olympic medalist. was denied the opportunity to compete at Henley because he had once worked as a bricklayer (in his own construction company). His boat club was banned because they had once publicly raised money to travel to compete there. Sports were held to be only for wealthy gentlemen who had never engaged in a trade or any kind of business.

post #8 of 13

Great footage.  Had forgotten about Schranz's bug-eye goggles.  

 

Was 68 the year the competitors were supposed to cover all the logos (it was a great year for masking tape)?  They came at a moment when the times and attitudes of Europe and NA were changing so fast.  All sports were changing as the TV coverage exploded across our living rooms. Wonder how much of this was pushed by the media seeing this whole new source of commercial sponsors?  The Wide World of Sports, was an American staple in those years.

 

Look what had happened to skiing in the 8 years since Squaw Valley,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBtFvcrYXCw

 

The 60's = "The Times They Are A-Changin' ".  Bob Dylan.  

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Great footage.  Had forgotten about Schranz's bug-eye goggles.  

 

Was 68 the year the competitors were supposed to cover all the logos (it was a great year for masking tape)?  They came at a moment when the times and attitudes of Europe and NA were changing so fast.  All sports were changing as the TV coverage exploded across our living rooms. Wonder how much of this was pushed by the media seeing this whole new source of commercial sponsors?  The Wide World of Sports, was an American staple in those years.

 

Look what had happened to skiing in the 8 years since Squaw Valley,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBtFvcrYXCw

 

The 60's = "The Times They Are A-Changin' ".  Bob Dylan.  

Wow! That is an amazing change in only 8 years! I hadn't realized how old fashioned the skiing was in 1960. I wonder how much it (the change) had to do with the new equipment, metal and composite skis, plastic boots?

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Luxuriating in bittersweet nostalgia is one of the great benefits of advancing age.
Hmm, I don't see anything bittersweet in this, just some beautiful skiing!

The skiing is the sweet part. The aging is the bitter part.
post #11 of 13

Time keeps on slipping, slipping, slipping...

 

 

Seems to go by faster with every passing year.

 

Hard to be The Man, and then not. This film captured it better than any I can think of...

 

Everybody's All-American

 

 

Feel compelled to include a bump for this excellent thread started by WVSkier a couple years ago...

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/103370/a-blast-from-the-past-sports-illustrated-1969-article-on-how-killy-skis

 


Edited by jc-ski - 3/17/13 at 10:12am
post #12 of 13

   It was windy up there at the start...KIlly admits he was damn lucky to win that DH. Made several adjustments up high, got pounded with ugly head winds out of the start right turn. Slow on bottom. Plus ski wax loss issues. Guy should have been 1st. Makes what Shred did at Worlds even more impressive in todays comp levels... The '68 GS win was a forgone conclusion. He had it in the bag if he stayed upright. The Slalom..well, another important race run in dense fog for TV. I would have liked to see Karl win that clean He was good! A great all around skier. A bit unlucky, but one tough, durable bad ass right there. Killy has done alright. Read up on Michel Arpin...he has a lot to do with all this!

   No one remembers who won or came in 4th in the 1964 Innsbruck slalom. Kidd & Huega became famous overnight. Pepi Stiegler won and Michel Arpin was soooooo close 4th to Huega. Arpin is a class act and a master of ski development in that era. He is significantly responsible for the KiIly success in the late 60's. They have moved together on several ski development projects, HEAD, etc.

   For you gear hounds, I have several pair of those 60's 200cm "black & blue" VR17' s downstairs right now.   &  No...I won't. Vail 1968! God, those were the days! Profile on those Arpin designed VR's is 87, 69, 78. A decade old Atomic GS11 is 101, 64, 90!. Amazing we all did not get killed racing next to trees on skinny trails, rocks, ledges, and those nifty wood and wire snow fences for "potection" in those days.  Oh. And NO sponsors. Officially...right? Avery? Sure...if you say so. Like Jean-Claude paid for all his goods, girls, cars and travel working part time on a customs sheriff paycheck... ; )  ;)  He's still wearing that smile after al these years!

 

   "Let Brundage come over here himself and try to take them from me!" Avery was finished within a year. The times had changed. I suggest the FIS smarten up too..Those Old Boys are pissing off the talent, their Meal Ticket. 195-35 meter GS skis. Keep that up, we will be back on those VR17's. Halfway there already ! My 1997 Atomic 9.28's in only 188cm are now FIS World Cup Master ILLEGAL! WTF??? Those are 15 years old! What about BMI ski length like ski jumping? NO, Let's just pull "195" 35m out of someones ass. How did that work? Slowed  'em right down it did...Ted had to rent an extra plane seat to haul his gold stash back to ParkC.

post #13 of 13

You know what's really interesting is how 'modern' Killy's GS looks compared to even the Stenmark/Mahrer/late Thoeni era. Avalement!!! Rahh!!!

 

('68 olympics were the first I watched... JCK was my childhood hero! smile.gif )

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