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Advice on 98mm Waist Options... Or Others. - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Well I'm used to tanks on my feet, so the current E98s should be light by comparison.  Prophet 98....too soft for me, but the OP might well enjoy.

post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 

Thanks for reviving this Makaiko!

 

Everything I've heard and read about the E98 says it's not the ski for me, but I'm willing to give it a shot if I get the chance.

 

Update:

 

Late last April I was able to demo the E88 and Bushwhacker, both in a 180, on the same day at Kirkwood.  Conditions were horrible!  Warm and sunny.  Wet and soft rapidly turned to slush.  With conditions the way they were I wasn't able to get a good feel for either ski at speed, but I was able to get a pretty good impression of both of these skis.  

 

I skied the E88 first. I found it very turny but at the same time dead.  When it got it on edge it came around fast but I didn't get much rebound out of it. If I didn't drive the tips I was able to lengthen the turns and it seemed pretty damp.  Overall, I came away feeling... meh.

 

The Bushwhacker, on the other hand, I found to be poppy and playful.  It got bounced around quite a bit in the sloppy conditions but I loved the feedback I got from it. I was able to vary turn shapes easily but felt like I was driving the ski through the turn, not being pulled through it.  I'd love to try the Brahma next to the Bushwhacker.  It would be interesting to feel the different skiing characteristics when the only variable is the added metal.

 

I learned a couple of things from these two skis.  1. I don't prefer a ski that's too damp.  However, put me in different conditions and I might change my mind.  2. I prefer a lighter, longer radius ski.

 

With new ski line ups out and after much reading and spec crunching, the next task is to demo more this year.  None of these have metal but all tout a frontside bias with the ability to venture off piste.  All would be between 177 to 180 in length and an 18.2 to 19.2 radius.

 

Short list:

Salomon Q98

Nordica Hell n Back

Line Sick Day 95

Atomic Theory

Scott The Ski (Probably only if Phil let's me borrow his)

 

I looked at the Sin 7 but a sub-16 radius ruled it out.

 

I really appreciate all the feedback,  Not just in this thread but everything in the Ski Gear Discussion.  There is a TON of knowledge and experience in here and just enough attitude to keep it interesting.  :)

post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rug wheelie View Post
 

I might get tarred and feathered for saying this but I was thoroughly underwhelmed by .... all of the Rossi Experience models.  Over rated.   Wouldn't ski them even if they were free.

 

 

QFT.  I demoed some E88s at Killington last spring.  Skied them only on the bumps on Superstar.  I thought they were horrible in that environment.  I actually like moguls although I'm no Z-liner, and I thought the E88 was totally unsuited for them.  No rebound, slow edge to edge, just lifeless.  BTW, my own skis that day were 94mm waisted Fischer Wateas and I couldn't wait to get back on them after 1 run on the E88s.  Ripping big turns on groomers?  Maybe that's where they shine, but certainly not in moguls or tight trees.

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickO661 View Post
 

I learned a couple of things from these two skis.  1. I don't prefer a ski that's too damp.  However, put me in different conditions and I might change my mind.  2. I prefer a lighter, longer radius ski.

 

With new ski line ups out and after much reading and spec crunching, the next task is to demo more this year.  None of these have metal but all tout a frontside bias with the ability to venture off piste.  All would be between 177 to 180 in length and an 18.2 to 19.2 radius.

 

Short list:

Salomon Q98

Nordica Hell n Back

Line Sick Day 95

Atomic Theory

Scott The Ski (Probably only if Phil let's me borrow his)

 

I looked at the Sin 7 but a sub-16 radius ruled it out.

 

I really appreciate all the feedback,  Not just in this thread but everything in the Ski Gear Discussion.  There is a TON of knowledge and experience in here and just enough attitude to keep it interesting.  :)

 


Ditto on the comments of Rug Wheelie and Bjohansson with respect to my demos of the E88's.  If you have determined through demos that you do NOT prefer a damp feeling ski, the E88 and E98 (pre 2014, at least) are probably not your best choice.

 

Love the short list of demo prospects here!  Since I am looking at many of the same, would love to hear what your impressions are when you demo.  I will be comparing them all to the Head RnR's, since I have that ski in my closet.

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by makakio View Post
 

If you're still looking: Rossi e98 is your ski.

 

Profile-wise I'm your doppelganger.  Here's why you need to try it (you'll buy it):

 

No other ski on that list handles 25+mph sweepers better than the e98.  It isn't hard to turn slow or break away into shorter turns AT ALL, but put it on edge and it rails.  Plus, it's damp - which is a HUGE positive when dealing with west coast cut up mank and day-old junk AND when you're railing down a groomer.  I have not skied a better spring/corn/crud/junk ski.  Confidence on a damp ski with great edge grip skyrockets all over the mountain.

 

So unless you're living on hard snow (where ironically it is rated highest for 98mm skis) or spending all your time in tight chutes there isn't a better all-mountain ski for a GS-turner who needs a one-ski quiver.  It works *everywhere*.

 

Let me repeat: it is not a terribly stiff thing that requires brute strength or perfect technique.  I'm a fast, lazy, 6'1"/185lb, 42yo with solid fundamental skills from years on mountain in my 20s, but who only skis 10-12 days a year now and it's a perfect ski for me.  The only addition to my quiver would be a dedicated pow ski (I'd add the Rossi Soul or Super 7 for that), but I've skied the e98 in everything from dust on crust to 30" of heavy sierra fresh and it just blasts right over and through.  It's a perfect CA/OR/WA ski.

Me too (me three?).  Fraction of an inch taller and ten more pounds dressed with boots than Rick, same yee-hah groom-zoom bias, coming off of 74mm Rossi RPM 17s, several seasons of not much skiing, and 65 years old to boot.  I second everything makakio says about the E98.  The only deeper snow I've been able to try mine (180cm) in was last April at Squaw Valley, when we lucked into January conditions after a fluke storm.  There was a flank on Granite Chief where the wind was blowing this really nice spring powder into boot-top depths behind a row of trees.  Only a few hundred feet and not very wide, but enough for face shots, then out the bottom through the chop to the groom.  The E98 just blasted off the windblown hardpack groomed, out into this little pocket of Sierra fluff, scattered snowflakes into the air with big soft smears, blew through the chop, and hooked up again back on the groom.  There is NOTHING this ski won't do well, and it's not at all an overly "technical" ski, in the sense of being tricky to get optimum performance from.  It's easy to ski, in fact, plush and stable.  It even stairsteps down big round bumps effortlessly.

 

It does want some speed before it really responds, but that's just a matter of generating enough force to bend the ski into turns, not numb-below-Super-G-speeds sluggish.  The only place it didn't shine was this gnarly little shoulder that Trekchick led us into before the bumps had softened last March, and there just wasn't room in that narrow slot to get enough momentum to liven up the ski.  So I cut over to the edge and ground up some chunky, lightly crusted old chop; end of issue.  They just needed a little more room to roam.  So that's it; they don't like to be squeezed into small spaces at slow speeds.

 

Everything else you describe about your skiing, they will sparkle and shine and amaze you.

 

BTW, it sounds like the three of us should get together this season; see if you can keep up with this old man...velocity is why we ski!

post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Makakio,

 

Did you mount your E98s on the recommended line, or behind?  I'm almost the same size as you (inch taller, 5lbs heavier) and have to get mine mounted. I've heard some people say on the line is fine, some say -1cm.  Any story to share on your situation?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

Gunner... if you're skiing the 180, which it sounds like you should be, the recommended mount is fine. It's not something to overthink.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Yep, 180.  Am totally used to pressuring tips anyways, so recommended is probably the best bet.  Thanks!

I went through this last spring.  Demoed the E98 (180cm; I'm 6'-180lb) twice at Squaw and had them move the bindings back 1cm the second time.  It was subjectively a bit better in the spring conditions, but I was also in 15-year-old Lange boots (Mondo 29.5, 332 BSL) with what is today excessive forward lean, so that may have had some impact on it.  When I bought the skis, my shop forgot that I had decided to mount them 1cm back, and they're mounted on the recommended line.

 

They're fine; great, in fact.

post #37 of 39

Not many people give hype to the some Kastle skis that deserve it, check out the BMX 98. Personal opinion, BUT, it blows the Bonafide out of the water, as well as most of the others you've mentioned.

post #38 of 39

^^^^^ I'm about the OP's size, touch lighter. Cannot speak to blowing stuff out of water, but my BMX98's are the truest all-mountain ski I've ever owned. Not A+ in anything, but B+ to A in everything. They're deceptively forgiving, but will handle anything I dish out with aplomb. I really value a ski that can relax when you want to, but still slice and dice on command. Wish they were a touch lighter, but hey...

 

Other 98 ski that's always interested me is the Kabookie. Can't get a bead on whether it's a lighter Bonafide or a wider Bushwacker. First possibility is uninteresting. Second would be worth a serious looksee. 

post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

^^^^^ I'm about the OP's size, touch lighter. Cannot speak to blowing stuff out of water, but my BMX98's are the truest all-mountain ski I've ever owned. Not A+ in anything, but B+ to A in everything. They're deceptively forgiving, but will handle anything I dish out with aplomb. I really value a ski that can relax when you want to, but still slice and dice on command. Wish they were a touch lighter, but hey...

 

Other 98 ski that's always interested me is the Kabookie. Can't get a bead on whether it's a lighter Bonafide or a wider Bushwacker. First possibility is uninteresting. Second would be worth a serious looksee. 

Obviously I might have slightly exaggerated, but they are a fantastic ski. And for myself and my style I much prefer them to the Bonafide. The Kabookie's were a nice ski, would have to say they really fall more in the lighter Bonafide category then a wider Bushwacker. They are stiffer and more aggressive then the Bushwacker even with the lack of metal, and surprisingly aren't much softer then the Bonafide.

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