or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › Patroller Attitudes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Patroller Attitudes

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Any patrollers run into other patrollers who can't keep their hands out of a situation which in turn makes the incident a bigger cluster F than it needs to be. For example your first on the scene you do primary assessment and call in what you need. A patroller who is off duty not even in uniform comes on scene but can't keep their hands out of the the scene. Instead of asking how can I help you they jump right into an assessment himself asking the patient questions that have already been asked and getting more in the way than anything. Anyone else out there have those patrollers around? if your not first on and your off duty in my opinion you need to Stay out of it unless your asked to help or you ask the patroller first on scene how to help. Jumping in is more annoying and slows things down more...IMO...any thoughts..

post #2 of 20

I guess they can't help themselves; their training kicks in.  In a perfect world this wouldn't happen, but since we don't live in a perfect world, I would rather have patrolers over-trained than under-trained.

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

Yes exactly he couldnt help himself.It wasnt a matter of being over trained or undertrained he took steps that had already been taken care of and slowed the process down. My question is why come to the mountain and ride not in uniform and then act like he had to be in all the action...I say if your gonna get involved and you cant stay out of it wear your colors. I guess this is really a issue that needs to be addressed with this patroller...
 

post #4 of 20

Practice this phrase:  "Chill, got this."  When you feel like you've got it down, use it.  

post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I guess they can't help themselves; their training kicks in.  In a perfect world this wouldn't happen, but since we don't live in a perfect world, I would rather have patrolers over-trained than under-trained.

 

I would say his training was incomplete.  That kind of behaviour seems unprofessional to me.  We are trained to ask if help is needed and take the role that is offered or leave if our help isn't needed or wanted. 

post #6 of 20

^^^^

Yes, and some of us are better at that than others. cool.gif

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

Tetonpwdrjunkie-Thank you I think so exactly..we are trained to ask before jumping in...and if your not in uniform and not carrying a radio that also tells all the other patrollers that person doesnt want to patrol today!
 

post #8 of 20

I'm not a Patroller, but I spent an entire career as a First Responder in a major city, so...

 

In my professional opinion, Bob Lee is "Bang - On Target."  When that happens, simply pause for a 1/2-second, look the guy (or gal) square in the eye and calmly but firmly say, "Hey, I got this."  I say pause to speak to them eye to eye so that you both know you have the person's attention.

 

It's not an insult to the eager-beaver in any way, and it works 95% of the time.  For the 5% it doesn't work the first time, stick your palm out toward the offender (in that "talk to the hand" gesture) and repeat, "Dude!  ...I GOT this, alright."  That should do it for the more stubborn cases.

 

I've had to physically move someone aside (as gently as circumstances allow) a time or two, but that's a true rarity and involves a chat with the person's supervisor.

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

nice thanks skierish and Bob Lee I like it...
 

post #10 of 20

I second that.  In regard to this situation and and most other emergency situation, a hallmark of being highly trained and professional is knowing when it is appropriate to "help out" and when it is better for everyone if you stay out of the way. 

 

Sounds like a control freak hero wanna be.  Just hearing about this gets me fired up.  I would absolutly say something to him directly or the patrol director.  Doing this out of uniform may even be against a patrol bylaw or management directive.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by reconguy View Post
 

Sounds like a control freak hero wanna be.  

 

Maybe.

Most of the time, it's a young and eager hard-charger who just wants to jump in and make use of his/her cool training.  There's action, and they want in on it.

 

That's why the ol' eye to eye "I got this" almost always works fine.  They suddenly "get it."  In fact, most times when I've had something similar occur, the offender usually will even mutter a "Sorry" of some sort, maybe ask what help is needed, maybe keep onlookers at bay, or apologize in some way once the incident has wrapped up.  Like I said, 95% of the time it's easily resolved with no muss, no fuss.

 

If it is the rare barge in on everything "control freak hero wanna be," I agree that a stern word afterward is in order.  

If he tells you what you can do with your word, then yeah, it's tattle-tale time.

post #12 of 20

Are you sure it wasn't that hoser that is trying to buy a patrol jacket?
 

can i buy a patrol jacket and where it out on a hill?

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by reconguy View Post
 

Sounds like a control freak hero wanna be.  

 

Maybe.

Most of the time, it's a young and eager hard-charger who just wants to jump in and make use of his/her cool training.  There's action, and they want in on it.

 

That's why the ol' eye to eye "I got this" almost always works fine.  They suddenly "get it."  In fact, most times when I've had something similar occur, the offender usually will even mutter a "Sorry" of some sort, maybe ask what help is needed, maybe keep onlookers at bay, or apologize in some way once the incident has wrapped up.  Like I said, 95% of the time it's easily resolved with no muss, no fuss.

 

This has been my experience too.

post #14 of 20

We drill the idea that "the scene leader is the leader until s/he stops leading" into every new patroller that we train. We make every effort to squash the takeover behavior in the A-type candidates, and spend time teaching them how to make suggestions without infringing on the leader's lead as well. Respecting someone's lead is a pretty important part of being a patroller. Every class has one or two like this and while it's great that they are gung-ho, keeping the attitude issues and backfighting and grumbling down in the corps is important.

post #15 of 20

put him in charge of traffic control

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Yeah that's where he should have gone this guy wasn't in uniform or carrying a radio which told us...I'm here to ride not get my hands on any incidents...not the case
post #17 of 20

OTOH, just say, hey the the injured person's name is Tim.  I leave him in your capable hands.  I am going to go back to skiing.

 

That being said, he should have been taught that if he is not in uniform, he should not take an active role in treatment, unless requested to do so.  Stopping and asking the lead if he wants help is the correct course of action.

post #18 of 20

I have never had unwelcome help from a Patroller.  Never.  In fact, when ever skiers offer to assist in a wreck and identify as a Patroller, they are usually very competent and truly helpful.  I have had times when I was genuinely grateful for the extra set of helpful hands.

 

The worst experience I had was with a guy who pulled the doctor card (I am married to a doctor and love her and she nevers does this)-only to find out later that he was a DENTIST (yep, like a Seinfeld Episode) and he made a mess of the whole affair to boot.  But a self identified Patroller??  I've had nothing but truly commendable experiences.

 

Sorry.

post #19 of 20

that's bs, their should be a primary and back up, first on scene is primary, on our hill. unless primary doesn't know what their doing he or she can defer.  just keep the doctors outa the way of the first aid.

post #20 of 20

When I was a surgery resident many years ago one of the ER attendings had a police scanner and in his off hours was fond of going to the scene of accidents. One time I saw him arrive in the ER on top of a stretcher with his hands inside of the chest of a very dead victim he had cut open to perform open heart massage. As far as I know his "help" never did any good. In my experience there's nothing you can do with people like that--they don't change except sometimes slowly over time.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Patrol Shack
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › Patroller Attitudes